UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-Q

 

 

 

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2017

Commission file number:

1-13820 (Life Storage, Inc.)

0-24071 (Life Storage LP)

 

 

LIFE STORAGE, INC.

LIFE STORAGE LP

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Maryland (Life Storage, Inc.)   16-1194043
Delaware (Life Storage LP)   16-1481551
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

6467 Main Street

Williamsville, NY 14221

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip code)

(716) 633-1850

(Registrant’s telephone number including area code)

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

 

Life Storage, Inc.    Yes  ☒    No  ☐
Life Storage LP    Yes  ☒    No  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).

 

Life Storage, Inc.    Yes  ☒    No  ☐
Life Storage LP    Yes  ☒    No  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

Life Storage, Inc.:

 

Large Accelerated Filer      Accelerated Filer  
Non-accelerated Filer      Smaller Reporting Company  
Emerging Growth Company       

Life Storage LP:

 

Large Accelerated Filer      Accelerated Filer  
Non-accelerated Filer      Smaller Reporting Company  
Emerging Growth Company       

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

Life Storage, Inc.    ☐

Life Storage LP       ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

 

Life Storage, Inc.    Yes  ☐    No  ☒
Life Storage LP    Yes  ☐    No  ☒

As of July 17, 2017, 46,565,213 shares of Common Stock, $.01 par value per share, were outstanding.

 

 

 


EXPLANATORY NOTE

This report combines the quarterly reports on Form 10-Q for the periods ended June 30, 2017 of Life Storage, Inc. (the “Parent Company”) and Life Storage LP (the “Operating Partnership”). The Parent Company is a real estate investment trust, or REIT, that owns its assets and conducts its operations through the Operating Partnership, a Delaware limited partnership, and subsidiaries of the Operating Partnership. The Parent Company, the Operating Partnership and their consolidated subsidiaries are collectively referred to in this report as the “Company.” In addition, terms such as “we,” “us,” or “our” used in this report may refer to the Company, the Parent Company and/or the Operating Partnership.

Life Storage Holdings, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Parent Company (“Holdings”), is the sole general partner of the Operating Partnership; the Parent Company is a limited partner of the Operating Partnership, and through its ownership of Holdings and its limited partnership interest, controls the operations of the Operating Partnership, holding a 99.5% ownership interest therein as of June 30, 2017. The remaining ownership interests in the Operating Partnership are held by certain former owners of assets acquired by the Operating Partnership. As the owner of the sole general partner of the Operating Partnership, the Parent Company has full and complete authority over the Operating Partnership’s day-to-day operations and management.

Management operates the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership as one enterprise. The management teams of the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership are identical.

There are few differences between the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership, which are reflected in the note disclosures in this report. The Company believes it is important to understand the differences between the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership in the context of how these entities operate as a consolidated enterprise. The Parent Company is a REIT, whose only material asset is its ownership of the partnership interests of the Operating Partnership. As a result, the Parent Company does not conduct business itself, other than acting as the owner of the sole general partner of the Operating Partnership, issuing public equity from time to time and guaranteeing the debt obligations of the Operating Partnership. The Operating Partnership holds substantially all the assets of the Company and, directly or indirectly, holds the ownership interests in the Company’s real estate ventures. The Operating Partnership conducts the operations of the Company’s business and is structured as a partnership with no publicly traded equity. Except for net proceeds from equity issuances by the Parent Company, which are contributed to the Operating Partnership in exchange for partnership units, the Operating Partnership generates the capital required by the Company’s business through the Operating Partnership’s operations, by the Operating Partnership’s direct or indirect incurrence of indebtedness or through the issuance of partnership units of the Operating Partnership.

The substantive difference between the Parent Company’s filings and the Operating Partnership’s filings is the fact that the Parent Company is a REIT with public equity, while the Operating Partnership is a partnership with no publicly traded equity. In the financial statements, this difference is primarily reflected in the equity (or capital for the Operating Partnership) section of the consolidated balance sheets and in the Shareholders’ Equity and Partners’ Capital notes to the financial statements. Apart from the different equity treatment, the consolidated financial statements of the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership are nearly identical.

 

2


The Company believes that combining the quarterly reports on Form 10-Q of the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership into a single report will:

 

    facilitate a better understanding by the investors of the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership by enabling them to view the business as a whole in the same manner as management views and operates the business;

 

    remove duplicative disclosures and provide a more straightforward presentation in light of the fact that a substantial portion of the disclosure applies to both the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership; and

 

    create time and cost efficiencies through the preparation of one combined report instead of two separate reports.

In order to highlight the differences between the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership, the separate sections in this report for the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership specifically refer to the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership. In the sections that combine disclosures of the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership, this report refers to such disclosures as those of the Company. Although the Operating Partnership is generally the entity that directly or indirectly enters into contracts and real estate ventures and holds assets and debt, reference to the Company is appropriate because the business is one enterprise and the Parent Company operates the business through the Operating Partnership.

As the owner of the general partner with control of the Operating Partnership, the Parent Company consolidates the Operating Partnership for financial reporting purposes, and the Parent Company does not have significant assets other than its investment in the Operating Partnership. Therefore, the assets and liabilities of the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership are the same on their respective financial statements. The separate discussions of the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership in this report should be read in conjunction with each other to understand the results of the Company’s operations on a consolidated basis and how management operates the Company.

This report also includes separate Item 4 - Controls and Procedures sections, signature pages and Exhibit 31 and 32 certifications for each of the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership in order to establish that the Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer of the Parent Company and the Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer of the Operating Partnership have made the requisite certifications and that the Parent Company and the Operating Partnership are compliant with Rule 13a-15 or Rule 15d-15 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended and 18 U.S.C. §1350.

 

3


Part I. Financial Information

Item 1. Financial Statements

LIFE STORAGE, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

(dollars in thousands, except share data)

   June 30,
2017
(unaudited)
    December 31,
2016
 

Assets

    

Investment in storage facilities:

  

Land

   $ 786,539     $ 786,764  

Building, equipment, and construction in progress

     3,503,193       3,456,544  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
     4,289,732       4,243,308  

Less: accumulated depreciation

     (578,388     (535,704
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Investment in storage facilities, net

     3,711,344       3,707,604  

Cash and cash equivalents

     7,998       23,685  

Accounts receivable

     6,189       5,469  

Receivable from unconsolidated joint ventures

     1,022       1,223  

Investment in unconsolidated joint ventures

     132,524       67,300  

Prepaid expenses

     8,694       6,649  

Trade name

     16,500       16,500  

Other assets

     6,400       29,554  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Assets

   $ 3,890,671     $ 3,857,984  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Liabilities

    

Line of credit

   $ 331,000     $ 253,000  

Term notes, net

     1,388,380       1,387,525  

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

     66,134       75,132  

Deferred revenue

     10,020       9,700  

Fair value of interest rate swap agreements

     11,526       13,015  

Mortgages payable

     12,852       13,027  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Liabilities

     1,819,912       1,751,399  

Noncontrolling redeemable Operating Partnership Units at redemption value

     16,459       18,091  

Shareholders’ Equity

    

Common stock $.01 par value, 100,000,000 shares authorized, 46,565,213 shares outstanding at June 30, 2017 (46,454,606 at December 31, 2016)

     466       464  

Additional paid-in capital

     2,361,579       2,348,567  

Dividends in excess of net income

     (288,129     (239,062

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

     (19,616     (21,475
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Shareholders’ Equity

     2,054,300       2,088,494  

Noncontrolling interest in consolidated subsidiary

     —         —    
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Equity

     2,054,300       2,088,494  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity

   $ 3,890,671     $ 3,857,984  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

See notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

4


LIFE STORAGE, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(unaudited)

 

     Three Months Ended
June 30,
    Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
(dollars in thousands, except per share data)    2017     2016     2017     2016  

Revenues

    

Rental income

   $ 120,646     $ 98,795     $ 239,240     $ 190,337  

Other operating income

     12,138       8,210       21,865       15,792  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating revenues

     132,784       107,005       261,105       206,129  

Expenses

    

Property operations and maintenance

     29,719       23,153       59,515       46,014  

Real estate taxes

     14,498       11,021       28,933       21,568  

General and administrative

     15,959       10,114       27,396       20,578  

Acquisition costs

     —         1,694       —         4,078  

Operating leases of storage facilities

     141       —         141       —    

Depreciation and amortization

     38,105       18,251       75,747       34,676  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating expenses

     98,422       64,233       191,732       126,914  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income from operations

     34,362       42,772       69,373       79,215  

Other income (expenses)

    

Interest expense

     (15,716     (8,244     (30,926     (17,377

Interest expense – bridge financing commitment fee

     —         (7,329     —         (7,329

Interest income

     1       37       4       43  

Gain on sale of storage facilities

     —         15,270       —         15,270  

Equity in income of joint ventures

     785       998       1,506       1,913  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

     19,432       43,504       39,957       71,735  

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interest in the Operating Partnership

     (77     (208     (172     (338

Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interest in consolidated subsidiary

     —         160       —         399  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income attributable to common shareholders

   $ 19,355     $ 43,456     $ 39,785     $ 71,796  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Earnings per common share attributable to common shareholders – basic

   $ 0.42     $ 1.04     $ 0.86     $ 1.79  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Earnings per common share attributable to common shareholders – diluted

   $ 0.42     $ 1.03     $ 0.86     $ 1.78  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Common shares used in basic earnings per share calculation

     46,364,890       41,980,389       46,334,729       40,195,603  

Common shares used in diluted earnings per share calculation

     46,477,680       42,227,388       46,448,286       40,445,263  

Dividends declared per common share

   $ 1.00     $ 0.95     $ 1.95     $ 1.80  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

See notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

5


LIFE STORAGE, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

(unaudited)

 

    

Three Months ended

June 30,

   

Six Months ended

June 30,

 
(dollars in thousands)    2017     2016     2017     2016  

Net income

   $ 19,432     $ 43,504     $ 39,957     $ 71,735  

Other comprehensive income:

        

Effective portion of gain (loss) on derivatives net of reclassification to interest expense

     237       (4,352     1,859       (16,448
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total comprehensive income

     19,669       39,152       41,816       55,287  

Comprehensive income attributable to noncontrolling interest in the Operating Partnership

     (78     (187     (180     (261

Comprehensive loss attributable to noncontrolling interest in consolidated subsidiary

     —         160       —         399  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive income attributable to common shareholders

   $ 19,591     $ 39,125     $ 41,636     $ 55,425  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

See notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

6


LIFE STORAGE, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(unaudited)

 

(dollars in thousands)

   Six Months
Ended
June 30, 2017
    Six Months
Ended
June 30, 2016
 

Operating Activities

    

Net income

   $ 39,957     $ 71,735  

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:

    

Depreciation and amortization

     75,747       34,676  

Amortization of debt issuance costs and bond discount

     1,663       8,035  

Gain on sale of storage facilities

     —         (15,270

Equity in income of joint ventures

     (1,506     (1,913

Distributions from unconsolidated joint ventures

     2,852       2,548  

Non-vested stock earned

     3,246       3,802  

Stock option expense

     8       81  

Deferred income taxes

     (2,832     —    

Changes in assets and liabilities (excluding the effects of acquisitions):

    

Accounts receivable

     (720     2,193  

Prepaid expenses

     (2,299     (841

Receipts from (advances to) joint ventures

     201       (116

Accounts payable and other liabilities

     (8,023     (11,086

Deferred revenue

     320       (915
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

     108,614       92,929  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Investing Activities

    

Acquisitions of storage facilities, net of cash acquired

     (9,576     (415,749

Improvements, equipment additions, and construction in progress

     (45,662     (27,626

Net proceeds from the sale of real estate

     976       34,074  

Investment in unconsolidated joint ventures

     (66,590     (5,335

Property deposit

     —         (829
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash used in investing activities

     (120,852     (415,465
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Financing Activities

    

Net proceeds from sale of common stock

     9,760       942,150  

Proceeds from line of credit

     179,000       577,000  

Repayments of line of credit

     (101,000     (656,000

Proceeds from term notes, net of discount

     —         596,682  

Repayment of term note

     —         (150,000

Debt issuance costs

     —         (14,183

Settlement of forward starting interest rate swaps

     —         (9,167

Dividends paid - common stock

     (90,610     (68,637

Distributions to noncontrolling interest holders

     (424     (370

Mortgage principal payments

     (175     (74
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities

     (3,449     1,217,401  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net (decrease) increase in cash

     (15,687     894,865  

Cash at beginning of period

     23,685       7,032  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash at end of period

   $ 7,998     $ 901,897  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Supplemental cash flow information

    

Cash paid for interest, net of interest capitalized

   $ 30,624     $ 25,170  

Cash paid for income taxes, net of refunds

   $ 1,161     $ 970  

See notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

7


LIFE STORAGE LP

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

(dollars in thousands)

   June 30,
2017
(unaudited)
   
December 31,
2016
 

Assets

    

Investment in storage facilities:

  

Land

   $ 786,539     $ 786,764  

Building, equipment, and construction in progress

     3,503,193       3,456,544  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
     4,289,732       4,243,308  

Less: accumulated depreciation

     (578,388     (535,704
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Investment in storage facilities, net

     3,711,344       3,707,604  

Cash and cash equivalents

     7,998       23,685  

Accounts receivable

     6,189       5,469  

Receivable from unconsolidated joint ventures

     1,022       1,223  

Investment in unconsolidated joint ventures

     132,524       67,300  

Prepaid expenses

     8,694       6,649  

Trade name

     16,500       16,500  

Other assets

     6,400       29,554  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Assets

   $ 3,890,671     $ 3,857,984  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Liabilities

    

Line of credit

   $ 331,000     $ 253,000  

Term notes, net

     1,388,380       1,387,525  

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

     66,134       75,132  

Deferred revenue

     10,020       9,700  

Fair value of interest rate swap agreements

     11,526       13,015  

Mortgages payable

     12,852       13,027  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Liabilities

     1,819,912       1,751,399  

Limited partners’ redeemable capital interest at redemption value (217,481 units outstanding at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016)

     16,459       18,091  

Partners’ Capital

    

General partner (467,827 and 466,721 units outstanding at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively)

     20,708       21,065  

Limited partners (46,097,387 and 45,987,885 units outstanding at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively)

     2,053,208       2,088,904  

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

     (19,616     (21,475
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Controlling Partners’ Capital

     2,054,300       2,088,494  

Noncontrolling interest in consolidated subsidiary

     —         —    
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Partners’ Capital

     2,054,300       2,088,494  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Liabilities and Partners’ Capital

   $ 3,890,671     $ 3,857,984  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

See notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

8


LIFE STORAGE LP

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(unaudited)

 

(dollars in thousands, except per unit data)

   Three Months Ended
June 30,
    Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
   2017     2016     2017     2016  

Revenues

      

Rental income

   $ 120,646     $ 98,795     $ 239,240     $ 190,337  

Other operating income

     12,138       8,210       21,865       15,792  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating revenues

     132,784       107,005       261,105       206,129  

Expenses

    

Property operations and maintenance

     29,719       23,153       59,515       46,014  

Real estate taxes

     14,498       11,021       28,933       21,568  

General and administrative

     15,959       10,114       27,396       20,578  

Acquisition costs

     —         1,694       —         4,078  

Operating leases of storage facilities

     141       —         141       —    

Depreciation and amortization

     38,105       18,251       75,747       34,676  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating expenses

     98,422       64,233       191,732       126,914  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income from operations

     34,362       42,772       69,373       79,215  

Other income (expenses)

    

Interest expense

     (15,716     (8,244     (30,926     (17,377

Interest expense – bridge financing commitment fee

     —         (7,329     —         (7,329

Interest income

     1       37       4       43  

Gain on sale of storage facilities

     —         15,270       —         15,270  

Equity in income of joint ventures

     785       998       1,506       1,913  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

     19,432       43,504       39,957       71,735  

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interest in the Operating Partnership

     (77     (208     (172     (338

Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interest in consolidated subsidiary

     —         160       —         399  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income attributable to common unitholders

   $ 19,355     $ 43,456     $ 39,785     $ 71,796  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Earnings per common unit attributable to common unitholders – basic

   $ 0.42     $ 1.04     $ 0.86     $ 1.79  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Earnings per common unit attributable to common unitholders – diluted

   $ 0.42     $ 1.03     $ 0.86     $ 1.78  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Common units used in basic earnings per unit calculation

     46,364,890       41,980,389       46,334,729       40,195,603  

Common units used in diluted earnings per unit calculation

     46,477,680       42,227,388       46,448,286       40,445,263  

Distributions declared per common unit

   $ 1.00     $ 0.95     $ 1.95     $ 1.80  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income attributable to general partner

   $ 194     $ 437     $ 400     $ 721  

Net income attributable to limited partners

     19,161       43,019       39,385       71,075  

See notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

9


LIFE STORAGE LP

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

(unaudited)

 

    

Three Months ended

June 30,

   

Six Months ended

June 30,

 
(dollars in thousands)    2017     2016     2017     2016  

Net income

   $ 19,432     $ 43,504     $ 39,957     $ 71,735  

Other comprehensive income:

        

Effective portion of gain (loss) on derivatives net of reclassification to interest expense

     237       (4,352     1,859       (16,448
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total comprehensive income

     19,669       39,152       41,816       55,287  

Comprehensive income attributable to noncontrolling interest in the Operating Partnership

     (78     (187     (180     (261

Comprehensive loss attributable to noncontrolling interest in consolidated subsidiary

     —         160       —         399  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive income attributable to common unitholders

   $ 19,591     $ 39,125     $ 41,636     $ 55,425  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

See notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

10


LIFE STORAGE LP

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(unaudited)

 

(dollars in thousands)

   Six Months
Ended
June 30, 2017
    Six Months
Ended
June 30, 2016
 

Operating Activities

    

Net income

   $ 39,957     $ 71,735  

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:

    

Depreciation and amortization

     75,747       34,676  

Amortization of debt issuance costs and bond discount

     1,663       8,035  

Gain on sale of storage facilities

     —         (15,270

Equity in income of joint ventures

     (1,506     (1,913

Distributions from unconsolidated joint ventures

     2,852       2,548  

Non-vested stock earned

     3,246       3,802  

Stock option expense

     8       81  

Deferred income taxes

     (2,832     —    

Changes in assets and liabilities (excluding the effects of acquisitions):

    

Accounts receivable

     (720     2,193  

Prepaid expenses

     (2,299     (841

Receipts from (advances to) joint ventures

     201       (116

Accounts payable and other liabilities

     (8,023     (11,086

Deferred revenue

     320       (915
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

     108,614       92,929  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Investing Activities

    

Acquisitions of storage facilities, net of cash acquired

     (9,576     (415,749

Improvements, equipment additions, and construction in progress

     (45,662     (27,626

Net proceeds from the sale of real estate

     976       34,074  

Investment in unconsolidated joint ventures

     (66,590     (5,335

Property deposit

     —         (829
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash used in investing activities

     (120,852     (415,465
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Financing Activities

    

Net proceeds from sale of partnership units

     9,760       942,150  

Proceeds from line of credit

     179,000       577,000  

Repayments of line of credit

     (101,000     (656,000

Proceeds from term notes, net of discount

     —         596,682  

Repayment of term note

     —         (150,000

Debt issuance costs

     —         (14,183

Settlement of forward starting interest rate swaps

     —         (9,167

Distributions to unitholders

     (90,610     (68,637

Distributions to noncontrolling interest holders

     (424     (370

Mortgage principal payments

     (175     (74
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities

     (3,449     1,217,401  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net (decrease) increase in cash

     (15,687     894,865  

Cash at beginning of period

     23,685       7,032  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash at end of period

   $ 7,998     $ 901,897  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Supplemental cash flow information

    

Cash paid for interest, net of interest capitalized

   $ 30,624     $ 25,170  

Cash paid for income taxes, net of refunds

   $ 1,161     $ 970  

See notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

11


NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(Unaudited)

1. BASIS OF PRESENTATION

The accompanying unaudited financial statements of Life Storage, Inc. (the “Parent Company”) and Life Storage LP (the “Operating Partnership”) have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles for interim financial information and with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, they do not include all information and footnotes required by generally accepted accounting principles for complete financial statements. In the opinion of management, all adjustments (consisting of normal recurring accruals) considered necessary for a fair presentation have been included. Operating results for the six month period ended June 30, 2017 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ending December 31, 2017.

2. ORGANIZATION

The Parent Company operates as a self-administered and self-managed real estate investment trust (a “REIT”) that owns and operates self-storage facilities throughout the United States. All of the Parent Company’s assets are owned by, and all its operations are conducted through, the Operating Partnership. Life Storage Holdings, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Parent Company (“Holdings”), is the sole general partner of the Operating Partnership; the Parent Company is a limited partner of the Operating Partnership, and, through its ownership of Holdings and its limited partnership interest, controls the operations of the Operating Partnership, holding a 99.5% ownership interest therein as of June 30, 2017. The remaining ownership interests in the Operating Partnership (the “Units”) are held by certain former owners of assets acquired by the Operating Partnership. The Parent Company, the Operating Partnership and their consolidated subsidiaries are collectively referred to in this report as the “Company.” In addition, terms such as “we,” “us,” or “our” used in this report may refer to the Company, the Parent Company and/or the Operating Partnership.

At June 30, 2017, we had an ownership interest in, and/or managed 697 self-storage properties in 29 states under the name Life Storage®. Among our 697 self-storage properties are 57 properties that we manage for an unconsolidated joint venture (Sovran HHF Storage Holdings LLC) of which we are a 20% owner, 30 properties that we manage for an unconsolidated joint venture (Sovran HHF Storage Holdings II LLC) of which we are a 15% owner, six properties that we manage for an unconsolidated joint venture (191 III Life Storage Holdings LLC) of which we are a 20% owner, one property that we manage for an unconsolidated joint venture (Review Avenue Partners LLC) of which we are a 40% owner, and 37 properties that we manage and have no ownership interest.

We consolidate all wholly-owned subsidiaries. Partially owned subsidiaries and joint ventures are consolidated when we control the entity. Our consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Parent Company, the Operating Partnership, Life Storage Solutions, LLC (the Parent Company’s taxable REIT subsidiary), Warehouse Anywhere LLC (an entity owned 60% by Life Storage Solutions, LLC), and all other wholly-owned subsidiaries. All intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated. Investments in joint ventures that we do not control but for which we have significant influence over are accounted for using the equity method.

 

12


Included in the Parent Company’s consolidated balance sheets are noncontrolling redeemable Operating Partnership Units and included in the Operating Partnership’s consolidated balance sheets are limited partners’ redeemable capital interest at redemption value. These interests are presented in the “mezzanine” section of the consolidated balance sheet because they do not meet the functional definition of a liability or equity under current accounting literature. These represent the outside ownership interests of the limited partners in the Operating Partnership. At June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, there were 217,481 noncontrolling redeemable Operating Partnership Units outstanding. These unitholders are entitled to receive distributions per unit equivalent to the dividends declared per share on the Parent Company’s common stock. The Operating Partnership is obligated to redeem each of these limited partnership units in the Operating Partnership at the request of the holder thereof for cash equal to the fair market value of a share of the Parent Company’s common stock based on quoted market prices, at the time of such redemption, provided that the Company at its option may elect to acquire any such Unit presented for redemption for one common share or cash. The Company accounts for these noncontrolling redeemable Operating Partnership Units under the provisions of Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Topic 480-10-S99. The application of the ASC Topic 480-10-S99 accounting model requires the noncontrolling interest to follow normal noncontrolling interest accounting and then be marked to redemption value at the end of each reporting period if higher (but never adjusted below that normal noncontrolling interest accounting amount). The offset to the adjustment to the carrying amount of the noncontrolling interests is reflected in the Company’s dividends in excess of net income and in the Operating Partnership’s general partner and limited partners capital balances. Accordingly, in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets, noncontrolling interests are reflected at redemption value at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, equal to the number of noncontrolling interest units outstanding multiplied by the fair market value of the Parent Company’s common stock at that date. Redemption value exceeded the value determined under the Company’s historical basis of accounting at those dates.

The following is a reconciliation of the Parent Company’s noncontrolling redeemable Operating Partnership Units and the Operating Partnership’s limited partners’ redeemable capital interest for the period:

 

(dollars in thousands)

   Six Months
Ended
June 30, 2017
 

Beginning balance

   $ 18,091  

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interest in the Operating Partnership

     172  

Distributions

     (424

Adjustment to redemption value

     (1,380
  

 

 

 

Ending balance

   $ 16,459  
  

 

 

 

Approximately 23% and 14% of the Company’s revenue is derived from stores in the states of Texas and Florida, respectively.

3. STOCK BASED COMPENSATION

The Company accounts for stock-based compensation under the provisions of ASC Topic 718, “Compensation - Stock Compensation”. The Company recognizes compensation cost in its financial statements for all share based payments granted, modified, or settled during the period.

 

13


For awards with graded vesting, compensation cost is recognized on a straight-line basis over the related vesting period.

For the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company recorded compensation expense (included in general and administrative expense) of $4,000 and $35,000, respectively, related to stock options and $1,657,000 and $1,891,000, respectively, related to amortization of non-vested stock grants and performance-based awards. For the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company recorded compensation expense of $8,000 and $81,000, respectively, related to stock options and $3,246,000 and $3,757,000, respectively, related to amortization of non-vested stock grants and performance-based awards.    

No stock options were exercised by employees and directors during the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016. During the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, 2,239 and 3,696 shares of non-vested stock, respectively, vested. During the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, 47,028 and 10,881 shares of non-vested stock, respectively, vested.

During the six months ended June 30, 2017, the Company issued 8,944 shares of non-vested stock to employees which vest over five years. The fair market value on the date of grant of the non-vested stock issued during the six months ended June 30, 2017 was $86.78, resulting in an aggregate fair value of $0.8 million.

During the six months ended June 30, 2017, the Company granted performance-based awards that entitle the recipients to earn up to 17,888 shares if certain performance criteria are achieved over a three year period. The Company estimated the aggregate fair value of the awards on the grant date to be $0.8 million.

4. INVESTMENT IN STORAGE FACILITIES AND INTANGIBLE ASSETS

The following summarizes our activity in storage facilities during the six months ended June 30, 2017:

 

(dollars in thousands)

      

Cost:

  

Beginning balance

   $ 4,243,308  

Acquisition of storage facilities

     10,089  

Improvements and equipment additions

     35,284  

Additions to consolidated subsidiary

     82  

Net increase in construction in progress

     10,383  

Dispositions

     (9,414
  

 

 

 

Ending balance

   $ 4,289,732  
  

 

 

 

Accumulated Depreciation:

  

Beginning balance

   $ 535,704  

Additions during the period

     51,059  

Dispositions

     (8,375
  

 

 

 

Ending balance

   $ 578,388  
  

 

 

 

The Company acquired one self-storage facility during the six months ended June 30, 2017. The acquisition of this facility was accounted for as an asset acquisition (see Note 14 for further discussion of the Company’s adoption of the accounting guidance under ASU 2017-01 as of January 1, 2017). The cost of this facility, including closing costs, was assigned to land, building, equipment and improvements based upon their relative fair values.

 

14


The purchase price of the facility acquired in 2017 has been preliminarily assigned as follows:

 

(dollars in thousands)

            Consideration paid                              

States

   Number
of
Properties
     Date of
Acquisition
     Purchase
Price
     Cash Paid      Value of
Operating
Partnership
Units
Issued
     Mortgage
Assumed
     Net Other
Liabilities
(Assets)
Assumed
     Land      Building,
Equipment,
and
Improvements
     In-Place
Customers
Leases
     Closing
Costs
Expensed
 

IL

     1        2/23/17      $ 10,089      $ 10,076      $ —        $ —        $ 13      $ 771      $ 9,318      $ —        $ —    

The facility acquired was purchased from an unrelated third party. The operating results of the facility acquired have been included in the Company’s operations since the acquisition date. The $10.1 million of cash paid for the facility includes $0.5 million of deposits that were paid in 2015 when this facility originally went under contract. This amount is excluded from total cash payments for the acquisition of storage facilities in the consolidated statement of cash flows.

Non-cash investing activities during the six months ended June 30, 2017 include the assumption of net other liabilities of $13,000. Non-cash investing activities during the six months ended June 30, 2016 include the issuance of $7.8 million in Operating Partnership Units, the assumption of two mortgages with fair values totaling $8.3 million, and the assumption of net other liabilities of $1.7 million.

The Company measures the fair value of in-place customer lease intangible assets based on the Company’s experience with customer turnover and the cost to replace the in-place leases. The Company amortizes in-place customer leases on a straight-line basis over 12 months (the estimated future benefit period). The Company measures the value of trade names, which have an indefinite life and are not amortized, by calculating discounted cash flows utilizing the relief from royalty method.

In-place customer leases are included in other assets on the Company’s consolidated balance sheets as follows:

 

(Dollars in thousands)    Jun. 30,
2017
     Dec. 31,
2016
 

In-place customer leases

   $ 75,611      $ 75,611  

Accumulated amortization

     (75,478      (50,782
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net carrying value at the end of period

   $ 133      $ 24,829  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Amortization expense related to in-place customer leases was $11.9 million and $1.8 million for the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively, and was $24.7 million and $3.0 million for the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively. The Company expects to record $24.8 million and $0 of amortization expense for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2018, respectively.

Change in Useful Life Estimates

The change in name of the Company’s storage facilities from Uncle Bob’s Self Storage® to Life Storage® required replacement of signage at all existing storage facilities which are currently included in investment in storage facilities, net on the consolidated balance sheets. The replacement of this signage has been substantially completed as of June 30, 2017. As a result of this replacement of

 

15


signage, the Company reassessed the estimated useful lives of the then existing signage in 2016. This useful life reassessment resulted in an increase in depreciation expense of approximately $0.5 million in the first quarter of 2017 as depreciation was accelerated over the new useful lives. The Company does not estimate any further impact on depreciation expense as a result of the replacement of the Uncle Bob’s Self Storage® signage which is now fully depreciated.

As part of the Company’s capital improvement efforts during 2017, buildings at certain self-storage facilities were identified for replacement. As a result of the decision to replace these buildings, the Company reassessed the estimated useful lives of the then existing buildings. This useful life reassessment resulted in an increase in depreciation expense of approximately $1.4 million and $1.5 million, respectively, during the three and six month periods ending June 30, 2017. The Company estimates that the change in estimated useful lives of buildings identified for replacement as of June 30, 2017 will result in an additional increase in depreciation expense of approximately $0.5 million during the remainder of 2017.

The accelerated depreciation resulting from the events discussed above reduced both basic and diluted earnings per share/unit by approximately $0.03 and $0.04, respectively, for the three and six month periods ending June 30, 2017.

5. UNSECURED LINE OF CREDIT AND TERM NOTES

Borrowings outstanding on our unsecured line of credit and term notes are as follows:

 

(Dollars in thousands)

   Jun. 30,
2017
     Dec. 31,
2016
 

Revolving line of credit borrowings

   $ 331,000      $ 253,000  

Term note due June 4, 2020

     325,000        325,000  

Term note due August 5, 2021

     100,000        100,000  

Term note due April 8, 2024

     175,000        175,000  

Senior term note due July 1, 2026

     600,000        600,000  

Term note due July 21, 2028

     200,000        200,000  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total term note principal balance outstanding

   $ 1,400,000      $ 1,400,000  

Less: unamortized debt issuance costs

     (8,634      (9,323

Less: unamortized senior term note discount

     (2,986      (3,152
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Term notes payable

   $ 1,388,380      $ 1,387,525  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

In January 2016, the Company exercised the expansion feature on its existing amended unsecured credit agreement and increased the revolving credit limit from $300 million to $500 million. The interest rate on the revolving credit facility bears interest at a variable annual rate equal to LIBOR plus a margin based on the Company’s credit rating (at June 30, 2017 the margin is 1.10%), and requires an annual 0.15% facility fee. The Company’s unsecured credit agreement also includes a $325 million unsecured term note maturing June 4, 2020, with the term note bearing interest at LIBOR plus a margin based on the Company’s credit rating (at June 30, 2017 the margin is 1.15%). The interest rate at June 30, 2017 on the Company’s line of credit was approximately 2.32% (1.79% at December 31, 2016). At June 30, 2017, there was $169 million available on the unsecured revolving line of credit. The revolving line of credit has a maturity date of December 10, 2019.

 

16


On June 20, 2016, the Operating Partnership issued $600 million in aggregate principal amount of 3.50% unsecured senior notes due July 1, 2026 (the “2026 Senior Notes”). The 2026 Senior Notes were issued at a 0.553% discount to par value. Interest on the 2026 Senior Notes is payable semi-annually in arrears on January 1 and July 1, beginning on January 1, 2017. The 2026 Senior Notes are fully and unconditionally guaranteed by the Parent Company. Proceeds received upon issuance, net of discount to par of $3.3 million and underwriting discount and other offering expenses of $5.5 million, totaled $591.2 million. The indenture under which the 2026 Senior Notes were issued restricts the ability of the Company and its subsidiaries to incur debt unless the Company and its consolidated subsidiaries comply with a leverage ratio not to exceed 60% and an interest coverage ratio of more than 1.5:1 on all outstanding debt, after giving effect to the incurrence of the debt. The indenture also restricts the ability of the Company and its subsidiaries to incur secured debt unless the Company and its consolidated subsidiaries comply with a secured debt leverage ratio not to exceed 40% after giving effect to the incurrence of the debt. The indenture also contains other financial and customary covenants, including a covenant not to own unencumbered assets with a value less than 150% of the unsecured indebtedness of the Company and its consolidated subsidiaries. The Company was in compliance with all of the financial covenants under the 2026 Senior Notes as of June 30, 2017.

On July 21, 2016, the Company entered into a $200 million term note maturing July 21, 2028 bearing interest at a fixed rate of 3.67%.

On April 8, 2014, the Company entered into a $175 million term note maturing April 8, 2024 bearing interest at a fixed rate of 4.533%. The interest rate on the term note increases to 6.283% if the Company is not rated by at least one rating agency or if the Company’s credit rating is downgraded.

In 2011, the Company entered into a $100 million term note maturing August 5, 2021 bearing interest at a fixed rate of 5.54%. The interest rate on the term note increases to 7.29% if the notes are not rated by at least one rating agency, the credit rating on the notes is downgraded or if the Company’s credit rating is downgraded.

The line of credit and term notes require the Company to meet certain financial covenants, measured on a quarterly basis, including prescribed leverage, fixed charge coverage, minimum net worth, limitations on additional indebtedness and limitations on dividend payouts. The Company was in compliance with its debt covenants at June 30, 2017.

We believe that if operating results remain consistent with historical levels and levels of other debt and liabilities remain consistent with amounts outstanding at June 30, 2017, the entire availability on the line of credit could be drawn without violating our debt covenants.

 

17


The Company’s fixed rate term notes contain a provision that allows for the noteholders to call the debt upon a change of control of the Company at an amount that includes a make whole premium based on rates in effect on the date of the change of control. At this time no change in control is planned or anticipated.

Deferred debt issuance costs and the discount on the 2026 Senior Notes are both presented as reductions of term notes in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016. Amortization expense related to these deferred debt issuance costs was $0.5 million and $0.4 million for the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively, and $1.0 million and $0.7 million for the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively, and is included in interest expense in the consolidated statements of income.

6. MORTGAGES PAYABLE AND DEBT MATURITIES

Mortgages payable at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016 consist of the following:

 

(dollars in thousands)

   Jun. 30,
2017
     Dec. 31,
2016
 

4.98% mortgage note due January 1, 2021, secured by one self-storage facility with an aggregate net book value of $9.7 million, principal and interest paid monthly (effective interest rate 5.21%)

   $ 2,941      $ 2,966  

4.065% mortgage note due April 1, 2023, secured by one self-storage facility with an aggregate net book value of $7.7 million, principal and interest paid monthly (effective interest rate 4.29%)

     4,162        4,207  

5.26% mortgage note due November 1, 2023, secured by one self-storage facility with an aggregate net book value of $8.0 million, principal and interest paid monthly (effective interest rate 5.55%)

     3,971        4,002  

5.99% mortgage note due May 1, 2026, secured by one self-storage facility with an aggregate net book value of $6.6 million, principal and interest paid monthly (effective interest rate 6.26%)

     1,778        1,852  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total mortgages payable

   $ 12,852      $ 13,027  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

18


The table below summarizes the Company’s debt obligations and interest rate derivatives at June 30, 2017. The estimated fair value of financial instruments is subjective in nature and is dependent on a number of important assumptions, including discount rates and relevant comparable market information associated with each financial instrument. The fair value of the fixed rate term notes and mortgage notes were estimated by discounting the future cash flows using the current rates at which similar loans would be made to borrowers with similar credit ratings and for the same remaining maturities. These assumptions are considered Level 2 inputs within the fair value hierarchy as described in Note 8. The carrying values of our variable rate debt instruments approximate their fair values as these debt instruments bear interest at current market rates that approximate market participant rates. This is considered a Level 2 input within the fair value hierarchy. The use of different market assumptions and estimation methodologies may have a material effect on the reported estimated fair value amounts. Accordingly, the estimates presented below are not necessarily indicative of the amounts the Company would realize in a current market exchange.

 

       Expected Maturity Date Including Discount         

(dollars in thousands)

   2017      2018      2019      2020      2021      Thereafter      Total      Fair
Value
 

Line of credit - variable rate LIBOR + 1.10% (2.32% at June 30, 2017)

     —          —        $ 331,000        —          —          —        $ 331,000      $ 331,000  

Notes Payable:

                 

Term note - variable rate LIBOR+1.15% (2.33% at June 30, 2017)

     —          —          —        $ 325,000        —          —        $ 325,000      $ 325,000  

Term note - fixed rate 5.54%

     —          —          —          —        $ 100,000        —        $ 100,000      $ 108,686  

Term note - fixed rate 4.533%

     —          —          —          —          —        $ 175,000      $ 175,000      $ 182,382  

Term note - fixed rate 3.50%

     —          —          —          —          —        $ 600,000      $ 600,000      $ 581,622  

Term note - fixed rate 3.67%

     —          —          —          —          —        $ 200,000      $ 200,000      $ 191,115  

Mortgage note - fixed rate 4.98%

   $ 25      $ 53      $ 56      $ 59      $ 2,748        —        $ 2,941      $ 3,090  

Mortgage note - fixed rate 4.065%

   $ 44      $ 92      $ 95      $ 99      $ 104      $ 3,728      $ 4,162      $ 4,220  

Mortgage note - fixed rate 5.26%

   $ 32      $ 67      $ 71      $ 74      $ 78      $ 3,649      $ 3,971      $ 4,233  

Mortgage note - fixed rate 5.99%

   $ 77      $ 160      $ 170      $ 181      $ 192      $ 998      $ 1,778      $ 1,913  

Interest rate derivatives - liability

     —          —          —          —          —          —          —        $ 11,526  

7. DERIVATIVE FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

Interest rate swaps are used to adjust the proportion of total debt that is subject to variable interest rates. The interest rate swaps require the Company to pay an amount equal to a specific fixed rate of interest times a notional principal amount and to receive in return an amount equal to a variable rate of interest times the same notional amount. The notional amounts are not exchanged. Forward starting interest rate swaps are also used by the Company to hedge the risk of changes in the interest-related cash outflows associated with the potential issuance of long-term debt. No other cash payments are made unless the contract is terminated prior to its maturity, in which case the contract would likely be settled for an amount equal to its fair value. The Company enters into interest rate swaps with a number of major financial institutions to minimize counterparty credit risk.

The interest rate swaps qualify and are designated as hedges of the amount of future cash flows related to interest payments on variable rate debt. Therefore, the interest rate swaps are recorded in the consolidated balance sheet at fair value and the related gains or losses are deferred in shareholders’ equity or partners’ capital as Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss (“AOCL”). These deferred gains and losses are recognized in interest expense during the period or periods in which the related interest payments affect earnings. However, to the extent that the interest rate swaps are not perfectly effective in offsetting the change in value of the interest payments being hedged, the ineffective portion of these contracts is recognized in earnings immediately.

 

19


Ineffectiveness was de minimis for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016.

The Company has interest rate swap agreements in effect at June 30, 2017 as detailed below to effectively convert a total of $325 million of variable-rate debt to fixed-rate debt.

 

Notional Amount

   Effective Date      Expiration Date      Fixed
Rate Paid
    Floating Rate
Received
 

$125 Million

     9/1/2011        8/1/18        2.3700     1 month LIBOR  

$100 Million

     12/30/11        12/29/17        1.6125     1 month LIBOR  

$100 Million

     9/4/13        9/4/18        1.3710     1 month LIBOR  

$100 Million

     12/29/17        11/29/19        3.9680     1 month LIBOR  

$125 Million

     8/1/18        6/1/20        4.1930     1 month LIBOR  

In the fourth quarter of 2015, the Company entered into forward starting interest rate swap agreements with a total notional value of $50 million. In the first quarter of 2016, the Company entered into additional forward starting interest rate swap agreements with a total notional value of $100 million. These forward starting interest rate swap agreements were entered into to hedge the risk of changes in the interest-related cash flows associated with the potential issuance of fixed rate long-term debt. In conjunction with the issuance of the $600 million 2026 Senior Notes (see Note 5) in the second quarter of 2016, the Company settled the forward starting swap agreements for a loss of approximately $9.2 million. The loss was recorded as accumulated other comprehensive loss and is being amortized as additional interest expense over the ten-year term of the $600 million 2026 Senior Notes. Consistent with the Company’s accounting policy, the cash outflow related to the settlement of the forward starting swap agreements is reflected as a financing activity in the consolidated statements of cash flows.

The interest rate swap agreements are the only derivative instruments, as defined by FASB ASC Topic 815 “Derivatives and Hedging”, held by the Company. During the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, the net reclassification from AOCL to interest expense was $0.7 million and $1.2 million, respectively, based on payments made under the swap agreements. During the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, the net reclassification from AOCL to interest expense was $1.6 million and $2.4 million, respectively, based on payments made under the swap agreements. Based on current interest rates, the Company estimates that payments under the interest rate swaps will be approximately $2.5 million for the 12 months ended June 30, 2018. Payments made under the interest rate swap agreements will be reclassified to interest expense as swap settlements occur or as payments under the 2026 Senior Notes are made. The fair value of the swap agreements, including accrued interest, was a liability of $11.5 million and $13.0 million at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively.

The Company’s agreements with its interest rate swap counterparties contain provisions pursuant to which the Company could be declared in default of its derivative obligations if the Company defaults on any of its indebtedness, including default where repayment of the indebtedness has not been accelerated by the lender. The interest rate swap agreements also incorporate other loan covenants of the Company. Failure to comply with the loan covenant provisions would result in the Company being in default on the interest rate swap agreements. As of June 30, 2017, the Company had not posted any collateral related to the interest rate swap agreements. If the Company had breached any of these provisions as of June 30, 2017, it could have been required to settle its obligations under the agreements at their net termination cost of $11.5 million.

 

20


The changes in AOCL for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 and June 30, 2016 are summarized as follows:

 

(dollars in thousands)

   Three Months
Ended
June 30, 2017
     Three Months
Ended
June 30, 2016
     Six Months
Ended
June 30, 2017
     Six Months
Ended
June 30, 2016
 

Accumulated other comprehensive loss beginning of period

   $ (19,853    $ (26,511    $ (21,475    $ (14,415

Realized loss reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive loss to interest expense

     956        1,160        2,076        2,357  

Unrealized loss from changes in the fair value of the effective portion of the interest rate swaps

     (719      (5,512      (217      (18,805
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Income (loss) included in other comprehensive loss

     237        (4,352      1,859        (16,448
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Accumulated other comprehensive loss end of period

   $ (19,616    $ (30,863    $ (19,616    $ (30,863
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

8. FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS

The Company applies the provisions of ASC Topic 820 “Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures” in determining the fair value of its financial and nonfinancial assets and liabilities. ASC Topic 820 establishes a valuation hierarchy for disclosure of the inputs to valuation used to measure fair value. This hierarchy prioritizes the inputs into three broad levels as follows. Level 1 inputs are quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. Level 2 inputs are quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets or inputs that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly through market corroboration. Level 3 inputs are unobservable inputs based on our own assumptions used to measure assets and liabilities at fair value. A financial asset or liability’s classification within the hierarchy is determined based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement.

Refer to Note 6 for presentation of the fair values of debt obligations which are disclosed at fair value on a recurring basis.

The following table provides the liabilities carried at fair value measured on a recurring basis as of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016 (in thousands):

 

     Asset
(Liability)
     Level 1      Level 2      Level 3  

June 30, 2017

           

Interest rate swaps

   $ (11,526      —        $ (11,526      —    

December 31, 2016

           

Interest rate swaps

   $ (13,015      —        $ (13,015      —    

Interest rate swaps are over the counter securities with no quoted readily available Level 1 inputs, and therefore are measured at fair value using inputs that are directly observable in active markets and are classified within Level 2 of the valuation hierarchy, using the income approach.

 

21


9. INVESTMENT IN JOINT VENTURES

A summary of the Company’s unconsolidated joint ventures is as follows:

 

Venture

   Number of
Properties
     Company
common
ownership
interest
    Carrying value of
investment at
Jun. 30, 2017
     Carrying value of
investment at
Dec. 31, 2016
 

Sovran HHF Storage Holdings LLC (“Sovran HHF”)1

     57        20   $ 86.5 million      $ 43.8 million  

Sovran HHF Storage Holdings II LLC (“Sovran HHF II”)2

     30        15   $ 13.4 million      $ 13.5 million  

191 III Holdings LLC (“191 III”)3

     6        20   $ 10.0 million      $ 0.7 million  

Life Storage-SERS Storage LLC (“SERS”)4

     0        20   $ 0.2 million        N/A  

Iskalo Office Holdings, LLC (“Iskalo”)5

     N/A        49   ($ 0.4 million    ($ 0.4 million

Urban Box Coralway Storage, LLC (“Urban Box”)6

     1        85   $ 4.1 million      $ 4.1 million  

SNL/Orix 1200 McDonald Ave., LLC (“McDonald”)7

     1        5   $ 2.7 million      $ 2.7 million  

SNL Orix Merrick, LLC (“Merrick”)8

     1        5   $ 2.5 million      $ 2.5 million  

Review Avenue Partners, LLC (“RAP”)9

     1        40   $ 12.0 million        N/A  

N 32nd Street Self Storage, LLC (“N32”)10

     1        46   $ 1.3 million        N/A  

 

1 Sovran HHF owns self-storage facilities in Arizona (11), Colorado (4), Florida (3), Georgia (1), Kentucky (2), Nevada (5), New Jersey (2), Ohio (6), Pennsylvania (1), Tennessee (2) and Texas (20). In June 2017, Sovran HHF acquired 18 self-storage facilities for $330 million in Arizona, Nevada and Tennessee. In connection with this acquisition, Sovran HHF entered into $135 million of mortgage debt which is secured by 16 of the self-storage facilities acquired. During the six months ended June 30, 2017, the Company contributed $40.0 million as its share of capital to fund the acquisition and an additional $3.2 million to fund the repayment of certain mortgages held by the joint venture. During the six months ended June 30, 2017, the Company received $1.7 million of distributions from Sovran HHF. As of June 30, 2017, the carrying value of the Company’s investment in Sovran HHF exceeds its share of the underlying equity in net assets of Sovran HHF by approximately $1.7 million as a result of the capitalization of certain acquisition related costs in 2008. This difference is included in the carrying value of the investment.

 

2 Sovran HHF II owns self-storage facilities in New Jersey (17), Pennsylvania (3), and Texas (10). During the six months ended June 30, 2017, the Company received $0.9 million of distributions from Sovran HHF II.

 

3 191 III owns six self-storage facilities in California. During the six months ended June 30, 2017, 191 III acquired these six self-storage facilities for a total of $104.1 million. In connection with the acquisition of these self-storage facilities, 191 III entered into $57.2 million of mortgage debt which is secured by the self-storage facilities acquired. During 2017 and 2016, the Company contributed $9.5 million and $0.7 million, respectively, as its share of capital to fund these acquisitions. During the six months ended June 30, 2017, the Company received $0.2 million of distributions from 191 III.

 

4 In May 2017, the Company executed a joint venture agreement, Life Storage-SERS Storage LLC (“SERS”), with an unrelated third party with the purpose of acquiring and operating self-storage facilities. During the six months ended June 30, 2017, the Company contributed $0.2 million as its share of capital to SERS. At June 30, 2017, SERS is under contract to acquire three self-storage facilities for a total of $39.0 million, of which the Company is committed to contribute up to $7.8 million. The Company expects SERS to enter into mortgage debt to fund a portion of the acquisition of these three self-storage facilities. The purchase of these facilities by SERS is subject to customary conditions to closing, and there is no assurance that the facilities will be acquired.

 

5 Iskalo owns the buildings that houses the Company’s headquarters and other tenants. The Company paid rent to Iskalo of $0.6 million and $0.5 million during the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively. During the six months ended June 30, 2017, the Company received $0.1 million of distributions from Iskalo.

 

6 Urban Box is currently developing a self-storage facility in Florida.

 

7 McDonald is currently developing a self-storage facility in New York. During 2016, the Company contributed $0.4 million of common capital and $2.3 million of preferred capital to McDonald as its share of capital to develop the property. McDonald entered into a non-recourse mortgage loan in order to finance the future development costs.

 

22


8 Merrick is currently developing a self-storage facility in New York. During 2016, the Company contributed $0.4 million of common capital and $2.1 million of preferred capital to Merrick as its share of capital to develop the property. Merrick has entered into a non-recourse mortgage loan in order to finance the future development costs.

 

9 In January 2017, the Company executed a joint venture agreement, Review Avenue Partners, LLC (“RAP”), with an unrelated third party. The Company contributed $12.5 million of common capital to RAP during the six months ended June 30, 2017. RAP is currently operating a self-storage property in New York.

 

10 In April 2017, the Company executed a joint venture agreement, N 32nd Street Self Storage, LLC (“N32”), with an unrelated third party. The Company contributed $1.3 million of common capital to N32 during the six months ended June 30, 2017. N32 is currently developing a self-storage property in Arizona.

Based on the facts and circumstances of each of the Company’s joint ventures, the Company has determined that none of the joint ventures are a variable interest entity (VIE) in accordance with ASC 810, Consolidation. As a result, the Company used the voting model under ASC 810 to determine whether or not to consolidate the joint ventures. Based upon each member’s substantive participation rights over the activities as stipulated in the joint venture agreements, none of the joint ventures are consolidated by the Company. Due to the Company’s significant influence over the operations of each of the joint ventures, all joint ventures are accounted for under the equity method of accounting.

The carrying values of the Company’s investments in joint ventures are assessed for other-than-temporary impairment on a periodic basis and no such impairments have been recorded on any of the Company’s investments in joint ventures.

The Company earns management and/or call center fees ranging from 6% to 7% of joint venture gross revenues as manager of HHF, HHF II, 191 III, and RAP. These fees, which are included in other operating income in the consolidated statements of operations, totaled $1.5 million and $1.3 million for the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively, and $2.9 million and $2.5 million for the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively. The Company will also earn management fees upon commencement of the operation of storage facilities owned by SERS, Urban Box, McDonald, Merrick and N32.

The Company’s share of the unconsolidated joint ventures’ income (loss) is as follows:

 

(dollars in thousands)

Venture

   Three Months
Ended
June 30, 2017
     Three Months
Ended
June 30, 2016
     Six Months
Ended
June 30, 2017
     Six Months
Ended
June 30, 2016
 

Sovran HHF

   $ 624      $ 570      $ 1,162      $ 1,078  

Sovran HHF II

     362        370        702        708  

191 III

     (10      —          25        —    

Urban Box

     —          4        —          14  

RAP

     (255      —          (501      —    

Iskalo

     64        54        118        113  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 785      $ 998      $ 1,506      $ 1,913  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

23


A summary of the unconsolidated joint ventures’ financial statements as of and for the six months ended June 30, 2017 is as follows:

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Balance Sheet Data:

 

Investment in storage facilities, net

   $ 1,034,265  

Investment in office building, net

     4,919  

Other assets

     24,401  
  

 

 

 

Total Assets

   $ 1,063,585  
  

 

 

 

Due to the Company

   $ 1,056  

Mortgages payable

     430,733  

Other liabilities

     12,059  
  

 

 

 

Total Liabilities

   $ 443,848  

Unaffiliated partners’ equity

     489,344  

Company equity

     130,393  
  

 

 

 

Total Partners’ Equity

     619,737  
  

 

 

 

Total Liabilities and Partners’ Equity

   $ 1,063,585  
  

 

 

 

Income Statement Data:

  

Total revenues

   $ 41,402  

Property operating expenses

     (13,793

Administrative, management and call center fees

     (3,494

Depreciation and amortization of customer list

     (8,437

Amortization of financing fees

     (325

Income tax expense

     (123

Interest expense

     (5,626
  

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 9,604  
  

 

 

 

The Company does not guarantee the debt of any of its equity method investees.

We do not expect to have material future cash outlays relating to these joint ventures outside our share of capital for future acquisitions of properties.

10. INCOME TAXES

The Company qualifies as a REIT under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, and will generally not be subject to corporate income taxes to the extent it distributes its taxable income to its shareholders and complies with certain other requirements.

The Company has elected to treat one of its subsidiaries as a taxable REIT subsidiary. In general, the Company’s taxable REIT subsidiary may perform additional services for tenants and generally may engage in certain real estate or non-real estate related business. A taxable REIT subsidiary is subject to corporate federal and state income taxes. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on differences between financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities.

 

24


The Company recorded federal and state income tax benefit of $2.5 million for the three months ended June 30, 2017 and the Company recorded federal and state income tax expense of $0.1 million for the three months ended June 30, 2016. The Company recorded federal and state income tax benefit of $2.2 million for the six months ended June 30, 2017 and the Company recorded federal and state income tax expense of $0.6 million for the six months ended June 30, 2016. At June 30, 2017 and 2016, there were no material unrecognized tax benefits. Interest and penalties relating to uncertain tax positions will be recognized in income tax expense when incurred. As of June 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company had no interest or penalties related to uncertain tax positions. Net income taxes payable at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016 and the net deferred tax liability of our taxable REIT subsidiary at December 31, 2016 are classified within accounts payable and accrued liabilities in the consolidated balance sheets. As of June 30, 2017, the Company’s taxable REIT subsidiary has a deferred tax liability of $3.0 million and deferred tax assets totaling $5.1 million. The net deferred tax asset of our taxable REIT subsidiary at June 30, 2017 is included in other assets in the consolidated balance sheets. The tax years 2013-2016 remain open to examination by the major taxing jurisdictions to which the Company is subject.

11. EARNINGS PER SHARE AND EARNINGS PER UNIT

The Company reports earnings per share and earnings per unit data in accordance ASC Topic 260, “Earnings Per Share.” Under ASC Topic 260-10, unvested share-based payment awards that contain nonforfeitable rights to dividends or dividend equivalents, whether paid or unpaid, are participating securities and shall be included in the computation of earnings-per-share pursuant to the two-class method. The Parent Company and the Operating Partnership have calculated their basic and diluted earnings per share/unit using the two-class method.

The following table sets forth the computation of basic and diluted earnings per common share utilizing the two-class method.

Earnings Per Share

 

(in thousands except per share data)

   Three Months
Ended 
Jun. 30, 2017
     Three Months
Ended 
Jun. 30, 2016
     Six Months
Ended 
Jun. 30, 2017
     Six Months
Ended 
Jun. 30, 2016
 

Numerator:

           

Net income attributable to common shareholders

   $ 19,355      $ 43,456      $ 39,785      $ 71,796  

Denominator:

           

Denominator for basic earnings per share – weighted average shares

     46,365        41,980        46,335        40,196  

Effect of Dilutive Securities:

           

Stock options and non-vested stock

     113        247        113        249  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Denominator for diluted earnings per share – adjusted weighted average shares and assumed conversion

     46,478        42,227        46,448        40,445  

Basic earnings per common share attributable to common shareholders

   $ 0.42      $ 1.04      $ 0.86      $ 1.79  

Diluted earnings per common share attributable to common shareholders

   $ 0.42      $ 1.03      $ 0.86      $ 1.78  

 

25


Earnings Per Unit

The following table sets forth the computation of basic and diluted earnings per common unit utilizing the two-class method.

 

(in thousands except per unit data)

   Three Months
Ended 
Jun. 30, 2017
     Three Months
Ended 
Jun. 30, 2016
     Six Months
Ended 
Jun. 30, 2017
     Six Months
Ended 
Jun. 30, 2016
 

Numerator:

           

Net income attributable to common unitholders

   $ 19,355      $ 43,456      $ 39,785      $ 71,796  

Denominator:

           

Denominator for basic earnings per unit – weighted average units

     46,365        41,980        46,335        40,196  

Effect of Dilutive Securities:

           

Stock options and non-vested stock

     113        247        113        249  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Denominator for diluted earnings per unit – adjusted weighted average units and assumed conversion

     46,478        42,227        46,448        40,445  

Basic earnings per common unit attributable to common unitholders

   $ 0.42      $ 1.04      $ 0.86      $ 1.79  

Diluted earnings per common unit attributable to common unitholders

   $ 0.42      $ 1.03      $ 0.86      $ 1.78  

Not included in the effect of dilutive securities above for both earnings per share and earnings per unit are 15,500 stock options and 133,094 unvested restricted shares for the three months ended June 30, 2017, and 102,173 unvested restricted shares for the three months ended June 30, 2016, because their effect would be antidilutive. Not included in the effect of dilutive securities above are 13,250 stock options and 142,074 unvested restricted shares for the six months ended June 30, 2017, and 116,373 unvested restricted shares for the six months ended June 30, 2016, because their effect would be antidilutive.

12. SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

The following is a reconciliation of the changes in the Parent Company’s total shareholders’ equity for the period:

 

(dollars in thousands)

   Six Months
Ended
June 30, 2017
 

Beginning balance of total shareholders’ equity

   $ 2,088,494  

Net proceeds from the issuance of common stock through Dividend Reinvestment Plan

     9,760  

Earned portion of non-vested stock

     3,246  

Stock option expense

     8  

Deferred compensation - directors

     —    

Adjustment to redemption value on noncontrolling redeemable Operating Partnership units

     1,380  

Net income attributable to common shareholders

     39,785  

Amortization of terminated hedge included in AOCL

     458  

Change in fair value of derivatives

     1,400  

Dividends

     (90,231
  

 

 

 

Ending balance of total shareholders’ equity

   $ 2,054,300  
  

 

 

 

On January 20, 2016, the Company completed the public offering of 2,645,000 shares of its common stock at $105.75 per share. Net proceeds to the Company after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and offering expenses were approximately $269.7 million.

 

26


On May 25, 2016, the Company completed the public offering of 6,900,000 shares of its common stock at $100.00 per share. Net proceeds to the Company after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and offering expenses were approximately $665.4 million.

Until May 2017, the Company had maintained a continuous equity offering program (“Equity Program”) with Wells Fargo Securities, LLC (“Wells Fargo”), Jefferies LLC (“Jefferies”), SunTrust Robinson Humphrey, Inc. (“SunTrust”), Piper Jaffray & Co. (“Piper”), HSBC Securities (USA) Inc. (“HSBC”), and BB&T Capital Markets, a division of BB&T Securities, LLC (“BB&T”), pursuant to which the Company could sell up to $225 million in aggregate offering price of shares of the Company’s common stock. The Equity Program expired in May 2017.

During the six months ended June 30, 2017 and June 30, 2016, the Company did not issue any shares of common stock under the Equity Program.

In 2013, the Company implemented a Dividend Reinvestment Plan. The Company issued 118,656 and 66,992 shares under the plan during the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively. On August 2, 2017, the Company’s Board of Directors suspended the Dividend Reinvestment Plan.

13. PARTNERS’ CAPITAL

The following is a reconciliation of the changes in total partners’ capital for the period:

 

(dollars in thousands)

   Six Months
Ended
June 30, 2017
 

Beginning balance of total controlling partners’ capital

   $ 2,088,494  

Net proceeds from the issuance of partnership units through Dividend Reinvestment Plan

     9,760  

Earned portion of non-vested stock

     3,246  

Stock option expense

     8  

Deferred compensation - directors

     —    

Adjustment to redemption value on limited partners’ redeemable capital interests

     1,380  

Net income attributable to common unitholders

     39,785  

Amortization of terminated hedge included in AOCL

     458  

Change in fair value of derivatives

     1,400  

Distributions

     (90,231
  

 

 

 

Ending balance of total controlling partners’ capital

   $ 2,054,300  
  

 

 

 

14. RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-09, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers,” which supersedes the revenue recognition requirements in “Revenue Recognition (Topic 605),” and requires an entity to recognize revenue in a way that depicts the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled to in

 

27


exchange for those goods or services. ASU 2014-09 is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2017. The Company has the option to apply the provisions of ASU 2014-09 either retrospectively to each prior reporting period presented or retrospectively with the cumulative effect of initially applying the new guidance recognized at the date of initial application (the modified retrospective transition method). We are currently evaluating the alternative methods of adoption and the effect of adopting ASU 2014-09 on our financial statements and related disclosures. We anticipate electing to adopt the standard using the modified retrospective transition method as of January 1, 2018. However, this election may change as we finalize our analysis of the impact of the provisions of ASU 2014-09 on the Company. We are also in the process of assessing which of our operating revenue streams will be impacted by the adoption of the new standard. Leases are specifically excluded from the scope of ASU 2014-09, therefore the Company does not anticipate that adoption of the new standard will have any impact on the timing or amounts of the Company’s rental revenue from customers which is a substantial portion of the Company’s total operating revenues.

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, “Leases (Topic 842)”. This guidance revises existing practice related to accounting for leases under Accounting Standards Codification Topic 840 Leases (ASC 840) for both lessees and lessors. The new guidance in ASU 2016-02 requires lessees to recognize a right-of-use asset and a lease liability for virtually all of their leases (other than leases that meet the definition of a short-term lease). The lease liability will be equal to the present value of lease payments and the right-of-use asset will be based on the lease liability, subject to adjustment such as for initial direct costs. For income statement purposes, the new standard retains a dual model similar to ASC 840, requiring leases to be classified as either operating or finance. For lessees, operating leases will result in straight-line expense (similar to current accounting by lessees for operating leases under ASC 840) while finance leases will result in a front-loaded expense pattern (similar to current accounting by lessees for capital leases under ASC 840). While the new standard maintains similar accounting for lessors as under ASC 840, the new standard reflects updates to, among other things, align with certain changes to the lessee model. ASU 2016-02 is effective for fiscal years and interim periods, within those years, beginning after December 15, 2018. Early adoption is permitted for all entities. The Company is in the process of completing its assessment of the impact that the adoption of ASU 2016-02 will have on its consolidated financial statements.

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-06, “Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815): Contingent Put and Call Options in Debt Instruments”. ASU 2016-06 simplifies the embedded derivative analysis for debt instruments containing contingent call or put options by removing the requirement to assess whether a contingent event is related to interest rates or credit risks. ASU 2016-06 is effective for fiscal years, and interim reporting periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2016. The implementation of this update did not result in any changes to our consolidated financial statements.

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-07, “Investments - Equity Method and Joint Ventures (Topic 323): Simplifying the Transition to the Equity Method of Accounting”. ASU 2016-07 eliminates the requirement that when an investment qualifies for use of the equity method as a result of an increase in the level of ownership interest or degree of influence, an adjustment must be made to the investment, results of operations, and retained earnings retroactively on a step-by-step basis as if the equity method had been in effect during all previous periods that the investment had been held. ASU 2016-07 is effective for fiscal years, and interim reporting periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2016. The implementation of this update did not result in any changes to our consolidated financial statements.

 

28


In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-09, “Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting” as part of its simplification initiative, which involves several aspects of accounting for share-based payment transactions, including the income tax consequences, classification of awards as either equity or liabilities, and classification on the statement of cash flows. ASU 2016-09 is effective for fiscal years, and interim reporting periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2016. The implementation of this update did not result in any changes to our consolidated financial statements.

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-15, “Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments (a Consensus of the Emerging Issues Task Force)” in an effort to reduce existing diversity in practice related to the classification of certain cash receipts and cash payments on the statements of cash flows. The guidance addresses the classification of cash flows related to, among other things, distributions received from equity method investees. The amendments in this update are effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those annual periods. ASU 2016-15 is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

In November 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-18, “Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Restricted Cash (a Consensus of the Emerging Issues Task Force)” which requires restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents to be included with cash and cash equivalents when reconciling the beginning-of-period and end-of-period total amounts shown on the statement of cash flows. The amendments in this update are effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017 and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption of this update is permitted. Other than modifications to the statement of cash flows, the adoption of ASU 2016-18 is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-01, “Business Combinations (Topic 805): Clarifying the Definition of a Business” which is intended to assist entities with evaluating whether a set of transferred assets and activities is a business. The amendments in this update are effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017 and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption of this update is permitted and the Company adopted this update effective January 1, 2017. The adoption of ASU 2017-01 is expected to have potential impact on the accounting treatment of properties acquired subsequent to the adoption date. Property acquisitions treated as business combinations under current guidance may no longer be treated as business combinations subsequent to the adoption of ASU 2017-01. To the extent that properties that we acquire do not meet the definition of a “business” under ASU 2017-01, future acquisitions of properties may be accounted for as asset acquisitions resulting in the capitalization of acquisition costs incurred in connection with these transactions and the allocation of the purchase price and related acquisition costs to the assets acquired based on their relative fair values. There were no properties acquired in the first six months of 2017 that would have been accounted for as business combinations prior to the adoption of ASU 2017-01.

 

29


In February 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-05, “Other Income – Gains and Losses from the Derecognition of Nonfinancial Assets (Subtopic 610-20): Clarifying the Scope of Asset Derecognition Guidance and Accounting for Partial Sales of Nonfinancial Assets” which clarifies the scope and application of ASC 610-20 on the sale or transfer of nonfinancial assets, including real estate, and in substance nonfinancial assets to noncustomers, including partial sales. The amendments in this update are effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those annual periods. The Company has not yet completed its assessment of the impact that the adoption of ASU 2017-05 will have on its consolidated financial statements.

15. COMMITMENT AND CONTINGENCIES

At June 30, 2017, the Company was under contract to acquire one self-storage facility for a purchase price of $12.4 million. The purchase of this facility is subject to customary conditions to closing, and there is no assurance that this facility will be acquired.

At June 30, 2017, SERS is under contract to acquire three self-storage facilities for a total of $39.0 million, of which the Company is committed to contribute up to $7.8 million. The Company expects SERS to enter into mortgage debt to fund a portion of the acquisition of these three self-storage facilities. The purchase of these facilities by SERS is subject to customary conditions to closing, and there is no assurance that the facilities will be acquired.

On or about August 25, 2014, a putative class action was filed against the Company in the Superior Court of New Jersey Law Division Burlington County. The action seeks to obtain declaratory, injunctive and monetary relief for a class of consumers based upon alleged violations by the Company of various statutory laws. On October 17, 2014, the action was removed from the Superior Court of New Jersey Law Division Burlington County to the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey. The Company brought a motion to partially dismiss the complaint for failure to state a claim, and on July 16, 2015, the Company’s motion was granted in part and denied in part. On October 20, 2016, the complaint was amended to add additional claims. The parties have entered into a memorandum of understanding to settle all claims for an aggregate amount of $8.0 million and will be jointly moving for preliminary judicial approval of the settlement in August 2017. The aggregate settlement amount of $8.0 million ($5.0 million after considering income tax impact) has been recorded as a liability of the Company in the accompanying consolidated balance sheet as of June 30, 2017. A portion of the settlement expense relates to self-storage facilities that are managed by the Company through its taxable REIT subsidiary. There is an income tax impact to the Company on that portion of the settlement expense as a result. The settlement is subject to approval by the court, a decision on which is expected later in 2017.

16. SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

On July 5, 2017, the Company declared a quarterly dividend of $1.00 per common share. The dividend was paid on July 26, 2017 to shareholders of record on July 17, 2017. The total dividend paid amounted to $46.5 million.

On August 2, 2017, the Company’s Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $200 million of the Company’s outstanding common shares (the Buyback Program). The Buyback Program allows the Company to purchase shares of its common stock in accordance with applicable securities laws on the open market, through privately negotiated transactions, or through other methods of acquiring shares. The Buyback Program may be suspended or discontinued at any time.

 

30


Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

The following discussion and analysis of the Company’s consolidated financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with the unaudited financial statements and notes thereto included elsewhere in this report.

DISCLOSURE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

When used in this discussion and elsewhere in this document, the words “intends,” “believes,” “expects,” “anticipates,” and similar expressions are intended to identify “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of that term in Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and in Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, which may cause the actual results, performance or achievements of the Company to be materially different from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such factors include, but are not limited to, the effect of competition from new self-storage facilities, which would cause rents and occupancy rates to decline; the Company’s ability to evaluate, finance and integrate acquired businesses into the Company’s existing business and operations; the Company’s ability to effectively compete in the industry in which it does business; the Company’s existing indebtedness may mature in an unfavorable credit environment, preventing refinancing or forcing refinancing of the indebtedness on terms that are not as favorable as the existing terms; interest rates may fluctuate, impacting costs associated with the Company’s outstanding floating rate debt; the Company’s ability to comply with debt covenants; any future ratings on the Company’s debt instruments; regional concentration of the Company’s business may subject it to economic downturns in the states of Florida and Texas; the Company’s reliance on its call center; the Company’s cash flow may be insufficient to meet required payments of operating expenses, principal, interest and dividends; and tax law changes that may change the taxability of future income.

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

FOR THE PERIOD APRIL 1, 2017 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2017, COMPARED TO THE PERIOD APRIL 1, 2016 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2016

We recorded rental revenues of $120.6 million for the three months ended June 30, 2017, an increase of $21.8 million or 22.1% when compared to rental revenues of $98.8 million for the same period in 2016. Of the increase in rental revenue, $1.0 million resulted from a 1.1% increase in rental revenues at the 435 core properties considered in same store sales (those properties included in the consolidated results of operations since January 1, 2016, excluding the properties we sold in 2016, and excluding stores not yet stabilized and three stores significantly impacted by flooding in 2016). The increase in same store rental revenues was a result of a 0.8% increase in rental income per square foot, partially offset by a 20 basis point decrease in average occupancy. The remaining increase in rental revenue of $20.8 million resulted from the revenues from the acquisition of properties completed since January 1, 2016, stores not yet stabilized and the three stores significantly impacted by flooding in 2016. Other operating income, which includes merchandise sales, insurance administrative fees, truck rentals, management fees and acquisition fees, increased by $3.9 million for the three months ended June 30, 2017 compared to the same period in 2016 primarily as a result of increased administrative fees earned on customer insurance, increased management fees earned as a result of an increase in managed properties, increased acquisition fee income resulting from joint venture acquisitions, and as a result of the properties acquired in 2016 and 2017.

 

31


Property operations and maintenance expenses increased $6.6 million or 28.4% in the three months ended June 30, 2017 compared to the same period in 2016. The 435 core properties considered in the same store pool experienced a $1.1 million or 5.6% increase in operating expenses primarily as a result of higher payroll and benefit costs along with internet marketing costs that have increased in an effort to drive more traffic to the Company’s website as a result of our name change to Life Storage. In addition to the same store operating expense increase, operating expenses increased $5.5 million as a result of the net activity from the acquisition of properties completed since January 1, 2016, stores not yet stabilized and the three stores significantly impacted by flooding in 2016. Real estate tax expense increased $3.5 million as a result of a 5.5% increase in property taxes on the 435 same store pool and the inclusion of taxes on the properties acquired in 2017 and 2016.

Net operating income increased $15.7 million or 21.6% as a result of the acquisitions completed since January 1, 2016, partially offset by a 0.6% decrease in our same store net operating income.

Net operating income or “NOI” is a non-GAAP (generally accepted accounting principles) financial measure that we define as total continuing revenues less continuing property operating expenses. NOI also can be calculated by adding back to net income: interest expense, impairment and casualty losses, operating lease expense, depreciation and amortization expense, acquisition related costs, general and administrative expense, and deducting from net income: income from discontinued operations, interest income, gain on sale of real estate, and equity in income of joint ventures. We believe that NOI is a meaningful measure to investors in evaluating our operating performance because we utilize NOI in making decisions with respect to capital allocations, in determining current property values, and in comparing period-to-period and market-to-market property operating results. Additionally, NOI is widely used in the real estate industry and the self-storage industry to measure the performance and value of real estate assets without regard to various items included in net income that do not relate to or are not indicative of operating performance, such as depreciation and amortization, which can vary depending on accounting methods and the book value of assets. NOI should be considered in addition to, but not as a substitute for, other measures of financial performance reported in accordance with GAAP, such as total revenues, operating income and net income. There are material limitations to using a measure such as NOI, including the difficulty associated with comparing results among more than one company and the inability to analyze certain significant items, including depreciation and interest expense, that directly affect our net income. We compensate for these limitations by considering the economic effect of the excluded expense items independently as well as in connection with our analysis of net income.

 

32


The following table reconciles our net income presented in the consolidated financial statements to NOI generated by our self-storage facilities for the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016.

 

     Three Months ended June 30,  
(dollars in thousands)    2017      2016  

Net income

   $ 19,432      $ 43,504  

General and administrative

     15,959        10,114  

Acquisition related costs

     —          1,694  

Operating leases of storage facilities

     141        —    

Depreciation and amortization

     38,105        18,251  

Interest expense

     15,716        15,573  

Interest income

     (1      (37

Gain on sale of storage facilities

     —          (15,270

Equity in income of joint ventures

     (785      (998
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net operating income

   $ 88,567      $ 72,831  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net operating income

     

Same store

   $ 63,840      $ 64,204  

Other stores and management fee income

     24,727        8,627  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total net operating income

   $ 88,567      $ 72,831  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Our 2017 same store results consist of only those properties that have been owned by the Company and included in our consolidated results since January 1, 2016, excluding stores purchased prior to January 1, 2016 that have not yet stabilized and three stores significantly impacted by flooding in 2016. The following table sets forth operating data for our 435 same store properties. These results provide information relating to property operating changes without the effects of acquisitions.

Same Store Summary

 

     Three Months ended June 30,      Percentage  

(dollars in thousands)

   2017      2016      Change  

Same store rental income

   $ 89,660      $ 88,686        1.1

Same store other operating income

     5,330        5,028        6.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total same store operating income

     94,990        93,714        1.4

Payroll and benefits

     7,978        7,761        2.8

Real estate taxes

     10,271        9,739        5.5

Utilities

     2,753        2,724        1.1

Repairs and maintenance

     3,212        3,178        1.1

Office and other operating expenses

     3,090        3,031        1.9

Insurance

     1,126        1,065        5.7

Advertising and yellow pages

     269        293        -8.2 %

Internet marketing,

     2,451        1,719        42.6
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total same store operating expenses

     31,150        29,510        5.6
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Same store net operating income

   $ 63,840      $ 64,204        -0.6 %
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
                   Change  

Quarterly same store move ins

     45,054        45,656        (602

Quarterly same store move outs

     39,570        40,280        (710

 

33


We believe the decrease in same store move ins was due to increased competition and customer rate sensitivity in certain markets. In addition, we believe our brand change to Life Storage has temporarily reduced our visibility on the internet. We believe the decrease in same store move outs was a result of customers increasing their length of stay.

General and administrative expenses for the three months ended June 30, 2017 increased $5.8 million or 57.8% compared with the three months ended June 30, 2016. The increase is primarily the result of the New Jersey lawsuit settlement discussed in Note 15.

There were no acquisition related costs recorded during the three months ended June 30, 2017. Acquisition related costs were $1.7 million for the three months ended June 30, 2016 as a result of the acquisition of nine stores during that period and $0.6 million incurred during that quarter related to the July 2016 LifeStorage, LP acquisition.

Depreciation and amortization expense increased to $38.1 million in the three months ended June 30, 2017 from $18.3 million in the same period of 2016, primarily as a result of amortization of customer lists and depreciation on the properties acquired in 2016 and 2017.

Total interest expense increased $0.1 million in the three months ended June 30, 2017 as compared to the same period in 2016 primarily as a result of interest on the $600 million 3.5% senior notes issued in June 2016 and the $200 million 3.67% term loan entered into in July 2016, partially offset by reduced interest costs as a result of a one-time $7.3 million bridge loan commitment fee in June 2016, coupled with the payoff of the $150 million 6.38% term loan in April 2016 with a draw on our line of credit which carries a lower interest rate.

We did not sell any storage facilities during the three months ended June 30, 2017. During the three months ended June 30, 2016 we sold eight storage facilities in Alabama (1), Georgia (1), Mississippi (1), Texas (1), and Virginia (4) for net proceeds of approximately $34.1 million, resulting in a $15.3 million gain on sale.

FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 1, 2017 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2017, COMPARED TO THE PERIOD JANUARY 1, 2016 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2016

We recorded rental revenues of $239.2 million for the six months ended June 30, 2017, an increase of $48.9 million or 25.7% when compared to rental revenues of $190.3 million for the same period in 2016. Of the increase in rental revenue, $3.7 million resulted from a 2.1% increase in rental revenues at the 435 core properties considered in same store sales (those properties included in the consolidated results of operations since January 1, 2016, excluding the properties we sold in 2016, and excluding stores not yet stabilized and three stores significantly impacted by flooding in 2016). The increase in same store rental revenues was a result of a 1.8% increase in rental income per square foot while average occupancy remained unchanged. The remaining increase in rental revenue of $45.2 million resulted from the revenues from the acquisition of properties completed since January 1, 2016, stores not yet stabilized and the three stores significantly impacted by flooding in 2016. Other operating income, which includes merchandise sales, insurance administrative fees, truck rentals, management fees and acquisition fees, increased by $6.1 million for the six months ended June 30, 2017 compared to the same period in 2016 primarily as a result of increased administrative fees earned on customer insurance, increased management fees earned as a result of an increase in managed properties, increased acquisition fee income resulting from joint venture acquisitions, and as a result of the properties acquired in 2016 and 2017.

 

34


Property operations and maintenance expenses increased $13.5 million or 29.3% in the six months ended June 30, 2017 compared to the same period in 2016. The 435 core properties considered in the same store pool experienced a $1.5 million or 3.8% increase in operating expenses as a result of higher payroll and benefit costs along with internet marketing costs that have increased in an effort to drive more traffic to the Company’s website as a result of our name change to Life Storage. In addition to the same store operating expense increase, operating expenses increased $12.0 million as a result of the net activity from the acquisition of properties completed since January 1, 2016, stores not yet stabilized and the three stores significantly impacted by flooding in 2016. Real estate tax expense increased $7.4 million as a result of a 5.5% increase in property taxes on the 435 same store pool and the inclusion of taxes on the properties acquired in 2017 and 2016.

Net operating income increased $34.1 million or 24.6% as a result of a 1.2% increase in our same store net operating income and the acquisitions completed since January 1, 2016.

The following table reconciles NOI generated by our self-storage facilities to our net income presented in the consolidated financial statements for the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016.

 

     Six Months ended June 30,  
(dollars in thousands)    2017      2016  

Net income

   $ 39,957      $ 71,735  

General and administrative

     27,396        20,578  

Acquisition related costs

     —          4,078  

Operating leases of storage facilities

     141        —    

Depreciation and amortization

     75,747        34,676  

Interest expense

     30,926        24,706  

Interest income

     (4      (43

Gain on sale of storage facilities

     —          (15,270

Equity in income of joint ventures

     (1,506      (1,913
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net operating income

   $ 172,657      $ 138,547  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net operating income

     

Same store

   $ 125,945      $ 124,404  

Other stores and management fee income

     46,712        14,143  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total net operating income

   $ 172,657      $ 138,547  
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Our 2017 same store results consist of only those properties that have been owned by the Company and included in our consolidated results since January 1, 2016, excluding stores purchased prior to January 1, 2016 that have not yet stabilized and three stores significantly impacted by flooding in 2016. The following table sets forth operating data for our 435 same store properties. These results provide information relating to property operating changes without the effects of acquisitions.

 

35


Same Store Summary

 

     Six Months ended June 30,      Percentage  

(dollars in thousands)

   2017      2016      Change  

Same store rental income

   $ 178,088      $ 174,413        2.1

Same store other operating income

     10,145        9,683        4.8
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total same store operating income

     188,233        184,096        2.2

Payroll and benefits

     15,995        15,440        3.6

Real estate taxes

     20,543        19,477        5.5

Utilities

     5,606        5,575        0.6

Repairs and maintenance

     6,921        6,831        1.3

Office and other operating expenses

     6,109        6,061        0.8

Insurance

     2,212        2,206        0.3

Advertising and yellow pages

     539        602        -10.5 %

Internet marketing,

     4,363        3,500        24.7
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total same store operating expenses

     62,288        59,692        4.3
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Same store net operating income

   $ 125,945      $ 124,404        1.2
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
                   Change  

Year-to-date same store move ins

     84,375        87,036        (2,661

Year-to-date same store move outs

     76,629        78,566        (1,937

We believe the decrease in same store move ins was due to increased competition and customer rate sensitivity in certain markets. In addition, we believe our brand change to Life Storage has temporarily reduced our visibility on the internet. We believe the decrease in same store move outs was a result of customers increasing their length of stay.

General and administrative expenses for the six months ended June 30, 2017 increased $6.8 million or 33.1% compared with the six months ended June 30, 2016. The key drivers of the increase were the New Jersey lawsuit settlement discussed in Note 15, net of the related income tax impact, $0.8 million related to costs incurred as a result of the name change to Life Storage, and $0.6 million related to increased salaries and benefits.

There were no acquisition related costs recorded during the six months ended June 30, 2017. Acquisition related costs were $4.1 million for the six months ended June 30, 2016 as a result of the acquisition of 34 stores during that period and $0.6 million incurred during the quarter related to the July 2016 LifeStorage, LP acquisition.

Depreciation and amortization expense increased to $75.7 million in the six months ended June 30, 2017 from $34.7 million in the same period of 2016, primarily as a result of amortization of customer lists and depreciation on the properties acquired in 2016 and 2017.

Total interest expense increased $6.2 million in the six months ended June 30, 2017 as compared to the same period in 2016 primarily as a result of interest on the $600 million 3.5% senior notes issued in June 2016 and the $200 million 3.67% term loan entered into in July 2016, partially offset by reduced interest costs as a result of a one-time $7.3 million bridge loan commitment fee in June 2016, coupled with the payoff of the $150 million 6.38% term loan in April 2016 with a draw on our line of credit which carries a lower interest rate.

We did not sell any storage facilities during the six months ended June 30, 2017. During the six months ended June 30, 2016 we sold eight storage facilities in Alabama (1), Georgia (1), Mississippi (1), Texas (1), and Virginia (4) for net proceeds of approximately $34.1 million, resulting in a $15.3 million gain on sale.

 

36


FUNDS FROM OPERATIONS

We believe that Funds from Operations (“FFO”) provides relevant and meaningful information about our operating performance that is necessary, along with net earnings and cash flows, for an understanding of our operating results. FFO adds back historical cost depreciation, which assumes the value of real estate assets diminishes predictably in the future. In fact, real estate asset values increase or decrease with market conditions. Consequently, we believe FFO is a useful supplemental measure in evaluating our operating performance by disregarding (or adding back) historical cost depreciation.

FFO is defined by the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts, Inc. (“NAREIT”) as net income available to common shareholders computed in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”), excluding gains or losses on sales of properties, plus impairment of real estate assets, plus depreciation and amortization and after adjustments to record unconsolidated partnerships and joint ventures on the same basis. We believe that to further understand our performance FFO should be compared with our reported net income and cash flows in accordance with GAAP, as presented in our consolidated financial statements.

In October and November of 2011, NAREIT issued guidance for reporting FFO that reaffirmed NAREIT’s view that impairment write-downs of depreciable real estate should be excluded from the computation of FFO. This view is based on the fact that impairment write-downs are akin to and effectively reflect the early recognition of losses on prospective sales of depreciable property or represent adjustments of previously charged depreciation. Since depreciation of real estate and gains/losses from sales are excluded from FFO, it is NAREIT’s view that it is consistent and appropriate for write-downs of depreciable real estate to also be excluded. Our calculation of FFO excludes impairment write-downs of investments in storage facilities.

Our computation of FFO may not be comparable to FFO reported by other REITs or real estate companies that do not define the term in accordance with the current NAREIT definition or that interpret the current NAREIT definition differently. FFO does not represent cash generated from operating activities determined in accordance with GAAP, and should not be considered as an alternative to net income (determined in accordance with GAAP) as an indication of our performance, as an alternative to net cash flows from operating activities (determined in accordance with GAAP) as a measure of our liquidity, or as an indicator of our ability to make cash distributions.

Reconciliation of Net (Loss) Income to Funds From Operations (unaudited)

 

(in thousands)

   Three Months
Ended
Jun. 30, 2017
     Three Months
Ended
Jun. 30, 2016
     Six Months
Ended
Jun. 30, 2017
     Six Months
Ended
Jun. 30, 2016
 

Net income attributable to common shareholders

   $ 19,355      $ 43,456      $ 39,785      $ 71,796  

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interest

     77        208        172        338  

Depreciation of real estate and amortization of intangible assets

     37,708        17,855        74,973        33,889  

Depreciation and amortization from unconsolidated joint ventures

     948        581        1,716        1,153  

Gain on sale of storage facilities

     —          (15,270      —          (15,270

Funds from operations allocable to noncontrolling redeemable Operating Partnership Units

     (229      (223      (502      (429
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

FFO available to common shareholders

   $ 57,859      $ 46,607      $ 116,144      $ 91,477  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

37


LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

Our line of credit and term notes require us to meet certain financial covenants measured on a quarterly basis, including prescribed leverage, fixed charge coverage, minimum net worth, limitations on additional indebtedness, and limitations on dividend payouts. At June 30, 2017, the Company was in compliance with all debt covenants. In the event that the Company violates its debt covenants in the future, the amounts due under the agreements could be callable by the lenders and could adversely affect our credit rating requiring us to pay higher interest and other debt-related costs. We believe that if operating results remain consistent with historical levels and levels of other debt and liabilities remain consistent with amounts outstanding at June 30, 2017, the entire availability under our line of credit could be drawn without violating our debt covenants.

Our ability to retain cash flow is limited because we operate as a REIT. In order to maintain our REIT status, a substantial portion of our operating cash flow must be used to pay dividends to our shareholders. We believe that our internally generated net cash provided by operating activities and the availability on our line of credit will be sufficient to fund ongoing operations, capital improvements, dividends and debt service requirements.

Cash flows from operating activities were $108.6 million and $92.9 million for the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively. The increase in operating cash flows in the 2017 period compared to the 2016 period was primarily due to the increase in net income after adjusting for non-cash items.

Cash used in investing activities was $120.9 million and $415.5 million for the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively. The decrease in cash used in investing activities in the 2017 period compared to the 2016 period was primarily due to the decreased volume of acquisitions in 2017 as compared to the same period in 2016, partially offset by increased capital contributions made to joint ventures to fund acquisitions completed by those joint ventures in 2017.

Cash used in financing activities was $3.4 million for the six months ended June 30, 2017, compared to cash provided by financing activities of $1,217.4 million for the six months ended June 30, 2016. On January 20, 2016, the Company completed the public offering of 2,645,000 shares of its common stock at $105.75 per share. Net proceeds to the Company after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and offering expenses were approximately $269.7 million. The Company used the net proceeds from the offering to repay a portion of the indebtedness then outstanding on the Company’s unsecured line of credit which had been used to fund acquisitions in the first quarter of 2016. Also on May 25, 2016, the Company completed the public offering of 6,900,000 shares of its common stock at $100.00 per share. Net proceeds to the Company after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and offering expenses were approximately $665.4 million. The Company initially used the net proceeds from the offering to repay the indebtedness then outstanding on the Company’s unsecured line of credit, with a portion held in cash at June 30, 2016. The proceeds from the May offering, the proceeds from the Company’s June 2016 unsecured senior notes offering, and draws on the line of credit were used to fund the purchase of LifeStorage, LP in July 2016 for approximately $1.3 billion.

In January 2016, the Company exercised the expansion feature of its existing amended unsecured credit agreement and increased the revolving credit limit from $300 million to $500 million. The interest rate on the revolving credit facility bears interest at a variable rate equal to LIBOR plus a margin based on the Company’s credit rating (at June 30, 2017 the margin is 1.10%), and requires a 0.15% facility fee. The Company’s unsecured credit agreement also includes a $325 million unsecured term note maturing June 4, 2020, with the term note bearing interest at LIBOR plus a margin based on the Company’s credit rating (at June 30, 2017 the margin is 1.15%). The interest rate at June 30, 2017 on the Company’s line of credit was approximately 2.32% (1.79% at December 31, 2016). At June 30, 2017, there was $169 million available on the unsecured line of credit. The revolving line of credit has a maturity date of December 10, 2019.

 

38


Our line of credit facility and term notes have an investment grade rating from Standard and Poor’s (BBB) and Moody’s (Baa2).

In addition to the unsecured financing mentioned above, our consolidated financial statements also include $12.9 million of mortgages payable that are secured by four storage facilities.

On August 2, 2017, the Company’s Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $200 million of the Company’s outstanding common shares (the Buyback Program). The Buyback Program allows the Company to purchase shares of its common stock in accordance with applicable securities laws on the open market, through privately negotiated transactions, or through other methods of acquiring shares. The Buyback Program may be suspended or discontinued at any time.

Until May 2017, the Company had maintained a continuous equity offering program (“Equity Program”) with Wells Fargo Securities, LLC (“Wells Fargo”), Jefferies LLC (“Jefferies”), SunTrust Robinson Humphrey, Inc. (“SunTrust”), Piper Jaffray & Co. (“Piper”), HSBC Securities (USA) Inc. (“HSBC”), and BB&T Capital Markets, a division of BB&T Securities, LLC (“BB&T”), pursuant to which the Company could sell up to $225 million in aggregate offering price of shares of the Company’s common stock. During the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company did not issue any shares of common stock under the Equity Program. The Equity Program expired in May 2017. The Company is considering entering into a new continuous equity offering program in the future.

In 2013, the Company implemented a Dividend Reinvestment Plan. The Company issued 118,656 shares under the plan during the six months ended June 30, 2017. On August 2, 2017, the Company’s Board of Directors suspended the Dividend Reinvestment Plan.

Future acquisitions, our expansion and enhancement program, and share repurchases are expected to be funded with draws on our line of credit, issuance of common and preferred stock, the issuance of unsecured term notes, sale of properties, and private placement solicitation of joint venture equity. Should the capital markets deteriorate, we may have to curtail acquisitions, our expansion and enhancement program and share repurchases.    

ACQUISITION AND DISPOSITION OF PROPERTIES

In the six months ended June 30, 2017, the Company acquired one self-storage facility comprising 78,000 square feet in Illinois for a purchase price of $10.1 million. As this facility was recently constructed, the capitalization rate on this purchase was 0%.

In 2016, the Company acquired 122 self-storage facilities comprising 9.4 million square feet in Arizona (1), California (22), Colorado (6), Connecticut (2), Florida (11), Illinois (25), Massachusetts (1), Mississippi (1), New Hampshire (5), Nevada (17), New York (4), Pennsylvania (1), South Carolina (1), Texas (23), Utah (1), and Wisconsin (1) for a total purchase price of $1,783.9 million. Based on the trailing financial information of the entities from which the properties were acquired, the weighted average capitalization rate was 3.6% on these purchases and ranged from 0% on recently constructed facilities to 6.7% on mature facilities.

During 2016 the Company sold eight non-strategic properties with a carrying value of $18.8 million and received cash proceeds of $34.1 million, resulting in a $15.3 million gain on sale.

We may seek to sell additional properties to third parties or joint venture partners in 2017.

 

39


FUTURE ACQUISITION AND DEVELOPMENT PLANS

Our external growth strategy is to increase the number of facilities we own by acquiring suitable facilities in markets in which we already have operations, or to expand into new markets by acquiring several facilities at once in those new markets. We are actively pursuing acquisitions in 2017 and at June 30, 2017, we were under contract to acquire one self-storage facility for consideration of $12.4 million.

In the six months ended June 30, 2017, we added 73,000 square feet to existing properties for a total cost of approximately $5.2 million and installed solar panels on two buildings for a total cost of approximately $0.4 million. We plan to complete an additional $30 million to $40 million of expansions and enhancements to our existing facilities in 2017, of which $20.3 million was paid as of June 30, 2017.

We also expect to continue making capital expenditures on our properties. This includes roofing, paving, and remodeling of store offices. For the first six months of 2017, we spent approximately $29.6 million on such improvements and we expect to spend approximately $11.0 million for the remainder of 2017.

REIT QUALIFICATION AND DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS

As a REIT, we are not required to pay federal income tax on income that we distribute to our shareholders, provided that we satisfy certain requirements, including distributing at least 90% of our REIT taxable income for a taxable year. These distributions must be made in the year to which they relate, or in the following year if declared before we file our federal income tax return, and if they are paid not later than the date of the first regular dividend of the following year. As a REIT, we must derive at least 95% of our total gross income from income related to real property, interest and dividends.

Although we currently intend to operate in a manner designed to qualify as a REIT, it is possible that future economic, market, legal, tax or other considerations may cause our Board of Directors to revoke our REIT election.

UMBRELLA PARTNERSHIP REIT

We are formed as an Umbrella Partnership Real Estate Investment Trust (“UPREIT”) and, as such, have the ability to issue Operating Partnership Units in exchange for properties sold by independent owners. By utilizing such Units as currency in facility acquisitions, we may obtain more favorable pricing or terms due to the seller’s ability to partially defer their income tax liability. As of June 30, 2017, 217,481 Units are outstanding. These Units had been issued in exchange for self-storage properties at the request of the sellers.

INTEREST RATE RISK

The primary market risk to which we believe we are exposed is interest rate risk, which may result from many factors, including government monetary and tax policies, domestic and international economic and political considerations, and other factors that are beyond our control.

We have entered into interest rate swap agreements in order to mitigate the effects of fluctuations in interest rates on our variable rate debt. The LIBOR base rates have been contractually fixed on $325 million of our debt through the interest rate swap termination dates. See Note 7 to our consolidated financial statements appearing elsewhere in this quarterly report on Form 10-Q.

 

40


Through September 2018, $325 million of our $656 million of floating rate unsecured debt is on a fixed rate basis after taking into account our interest rate swap agreements. Based on our outstanding unsecured floating rate debt of $656 million at June 30, 2017, and taking into account our interest rate swap agreements, a 100 basis point increase in interest rates would have a $3.3 million effect on our annual interest expense. These amounts were determined by considering the impact of the hypothetical interest rates on our borrowing cost and our interest rate swap agreements in effect on June 30, 2017. These analyses do not consider the effects of the reduced level of overall economic activity that could exist in such an environment. Further, in the event of a change of such magnitude, we would consider taking actions to further mitigate our exposure to the change. However, due to the uncertainty of the specific actions that would be taken and their possible effects, the sensitivity analysis assumes no changes in our capital structure.

INFLATION

We do not believe that inflation has had or will have a direct effect on our operations. Substantially all of the leases at the facilities are on a month-to-month basis which provides us with the opportunity to increase rental rates as each lease matures.

SEASONALITY

Our revenues typically have been higher in the third and fourth quarters, primarily because self-storage facilities tend to experience greater occupancy during the late spring, summer and early fall months due to the greater incidence of residential moves and college student activity during these periods. However, we believe that our customer mix, diverse geographic locations, rental structure and expense structure provide adequate protection against undue fluctuations in cash flows and net revenues during off-peak seasons. Thus, we do not expect seasonality to affect materially distributions to shareholders.

RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

See Note 14 to the financial statements.

 

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

The information required is incorporated by reference to the information appearing under the caption “Interest Rate Risk” in “Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” above.

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures

Conclusion Regarding the Effectiveness of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

Parent Company

An evaluation of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures, as such term is defined under Rule 13a-15(e) promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, has been conducted under the supervision of and with the participation of our management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer. Based on that evaluation, our management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective at June 30, 2017. There have not been changes in the Company’s internal controls or in other factors that could significantly affect these controls during the quarter ended June 30, 2017.

 

41


Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

There have not been any changes in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting (as defined in 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934) that occurred during the Company’s most recent fiscal quarter that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

Operating Partnership

An evaluation of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures, as such term is defined under Rule 13a-15(e) promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, has been conducted under the supervision of and with the participation of our management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer. Based on that evaluation, our management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective at June 30, 2017. There have not been changes in the Operating Partnership’s internal controls or in other factors that could significantly affect these controls during the quarter ended June 30, 2017.

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

There have not been any changes in the Operating Partnership’s internal control over financial reporting (as defined in 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934) that occurred during the Operating Partnership’s most recent fiscal quarter that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Operating Partnership’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

42


PART II. Other Information

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings

On or about August 25, 2014, a putative class action was filed against the Company in the Superior Court of New Jersey Law Division Burlington County. The action seeks to obtain declaratory, injunctive and monetary relief for a class of consumers based upon alleged violations by the Company of various statutory laws. On October 17, 2014, the action was removed from the Superior Court of New Jersey Law Division Burlington County to the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey. The Company brought a motion to partially dismiss the complaint for failure to state a claim, and on July 16, 2015, the Company’s motion was granted in part and denied in part. On October 20, 2016, the complaint was amended to add additional claims. The parties have entered into a memorandum of understanding to settle all claims for an aggregate amount of $8.0 million and will be jointly moving for preliminary judicial approval of the settlement in August 2017. The aggregate settlement amount of $8.0 million ($5.0 million after considering income tax impact) has been recorded as a liability of the Company in the accompanying consolidated balance sheet as of June 30, 2017. A portion of the settlement expense relates to self-storage facilities that are managed by the Company through its taxable REIT subsidiary. There is an income tax impact to the Company on that portion of the settlement expense as a result. The settlement is subject to approval by the court, a decision on which is expected later in 2017.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors

In addition to the other information set forth in this report, you should carefully consider the factors discussed in Part I, “Item 1A. Risk Factors” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016, which could materially affect our business, financial condition or future results. The risks described in our Annual Report on Form 10-K are not the only risks facing our Company. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently deem to be immaterial also may materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating results.

 

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

None

 

Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities

None

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

Not Applicable

 

Item 5. Other Information

None

 

43


Item 6. Exhibits

 

  31.1   Certification of Chief Executive Officer of Life Storage, Inc. pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) and Rule 15d-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act, as amended.
  31.2   Certification of Chief Financial Officer of Life Storage, Inc. pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) and Rule 15d-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act, as amended.
  31.3   Certification of Chief Executive Officer of Life Storage LP pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) and Rule 15d-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act, as amended.
  31.4   Certification of Chief Financial Officer of Life Storage LP pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) and Rule 15d-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act, as amended.
  32   Certification of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer of Life Storage, Inc. Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350 as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
  32.1   Certification of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer of Life Storage LP Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350 as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
101   The following financial statements from the Parent Company’s and the Operating Partnership’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2017, formatted in XBRL, as follows:
  (i)    Consolidated Balance Sheets at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016;
  (ii)    Consolidated Statements of Operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016;
  (iii)    Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016;
  (iv)    Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016; and
  (v)    Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

44


SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

Life Storage, Inc.
By:  

/S/ Andrew J. Gregoire

  Andrew J. Gregoire
  Chief Financial Officer
  (Principal Accounting Officer)

August 4, 2017

Date

 

Life Storage LP
By:  

/S/ Andrew J. Gregoire

  Andrew J. Gregoire
  Chief Financial Officer
  (Principal Accounting Officer)

August 4, 2017

Date

 

45