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UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2008
Commission File Number: 1-13820
SOVRAN SELF STORAGE, INC.
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)
     
Maryland   16-1194043
     
(State of incorporation or organization)   (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
6467 Main Street
Williamsville, NY 14221
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip code)

(716) 633-1850
(Registrant’s telephone number including area code)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
     
Title of Securities   Exchanges on which Registered
Common Stock, $.01 Par Value   New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to section 12(g) of the Act: None
     Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes þ No o
     Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act. Yes o No þ
     Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes þ No o
     Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. þ
     Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
             
Large accelerated filer þ    Accelerated filer o    Non-accelerated filer   o
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
  Smaller reporting company o 
     Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o No þ
     As of June 30, 2008, 21,890,727 shares of Common Stock, $.01 par value per share, were outstanding, and the aggregate market value of the Common Stock held by non-affiliates was approximately $882,013,334 (based on the closing price of the Common Stock on the New York Stock Exchange on June 30, 2008).
     As of February 15, 2009, 22,040,654 shares of Common Stock, $.01 par value per share, were outstanding.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
          Portions of the Definitive Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders of the Registrant to be held on May 21, 2009 (Part III).
 
 

 


 

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Part I
          When used in this discussion and elsewhere in this document, the words “intends,” “believes,” “expects,” “anticipates,” and similar expressions are intended to identify “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of that term in Section 27A of the Securities Exchange Act of 1933 and in Section 21E of the Securities Act of 1934. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, which may cause the actual results, performance or achievements of the Company to be materially different from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such factors include, but are not limited to, the effect of competition from new self-storage facilities, which would cause rents and occupancy rates to decline; the Company’s ability to evaluate, finance and integrate acquired businesses into the Company’s existing business and operations; the Company’s ability to effectively compete in the industry in which it does business; the Company’s existing indebtedness may mature in an unfavorable credit environment, preventing refinancing or forcing refinancing of the indebtedness on terms that are not as favorable as the existing terms; interest rates may fluctuate, impacting costs associated with the Company’s outstanding floating rate debt; the Company’s reliance on its call center; the Company’s cash flow may be insufficient to meet required payments of principal, interest and dividends; and tax law changes that may change the taxability of future income.
Item 1. Business
          Sovran Self Storage, Inc. together with its direct and indirect subsidiaries and the consolidated joint ventures, to the extent appropriate in the applicable context, (the “Company,” “We,” “Our,” or “Sovran”) is a self-administered and self-managed real estate investment trust (“REIT”) that acquires, owns and manages self-storage properties. We refer to the self-storage properties in which we have an ownership interest and are managed by us as “Properties.” We began operations on June 26, 1995. We were formed to continue the business of our predecessor company, which had engaged in the self-storage business since 1985. At February 15, 2009, we held ownership interests in and managed 385 Properties consisting of approximately 25.0 million net rentable square feet, situated in 24 states. Among our 385 self-storage facilities are 27 properties that we manage for a consolidated joint venture of which we are a majority owner and 25 properties that we manage for a joint venture of which we are a 20% owner. We believe we are the fifth largest operator of self-storage properties in the United States based on facilities owned and managed. Our Properties conduct business under the user-friendly name Uncle Bob’s Self-Storage ®.
          We own an indirect interest in each of the Properties through a limited partnership (the “Partnership”). In total, we own a 98.1% economic interest in the Partnership and unaffiliated third parties own collectively a 1.9% limited partnership interest at December 31, 2008. We believe that this structure, commonly known as an umbrella partnership real estate investment trust (“UPREIT”), facilitates our ability to acquire properties by using units of the Partnership as currency. By utilizing interests in the Partnership as currency in facility acquisitions, we may partially defer the seller’s income tax liability which in turn may allow us to obtain more favorable pricing.
          We were incorporated on April 19, 1995 under Maryland law. Our principal executive offices are located at 6467 Main Street, Williamsville, New York 14221, our telephone number is (716) 633-1850 and our web site is www.sovranss.com.
          We seek to enhance shareholder value through internal growth and acquisition of additional storage properties. Internal growth is achieved through aggressive property management: increasing rents, increasing occupancy levels, controlling costs, maximizing collections and strategically expanding and improving the Properties. Should economic conditions warrant, we may develop new properties. We believe that there continue to be opportunities for growth through acquisitions, and constantly seek to acquire self-storage properties that are susceptible to realization of increased economies of scale and enhanced performance through application of our expertise.
Industry Overview
          We believe that self-storage facilities offer inexpensive storage space to residential and commercial users. In addition to fully enclosed and secure storage space, many facilities also offer outside storage for automobiles, recreational vehicles and boats. Better facilities are usually fenced and well lighted with gates that are either manually operated or automated and have a full-time manager. Our customers rent space on a month-to-month basis

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and have access to their storage area during business hours and in certain circumstances are provided with 24-hour access. Individual storage units are secured by the customer’s lock, and the customer has sole control of access to the unit.
          According to the 2009 Self-Storage Almanac, of the approximately 47,500 facilities in the United States, less than 11% are managed by the ten largest operators. The remainder of the industry is characterized by numerous small, local operators. The shortage of skilled operators, the scarcity of capital available to small operators for acquisitions and expansions, and the potential for savings through economies of scale are factors that are leading to consolidation in the industry. We believe that, as a result of this trend, significant growth opportunities exist for operators with proven management systems and sufficient capital resources.
Property Management
          We believe that we have developed substantial expertise in managing self-storage facilities. Key elements of our management system include the following:
Personnel:
          Property managers attend a thorough orientation program and undergo continuous training that emphasizes closing techniques, identification of selected marketing opportunities, networking with possible referral sources, and familiarization with our customized management information system. In addition to frequent contact with Area Managers and other Company personnel, property managers receive periodic newsletters via our intranet regarding a variety of operational issues, and from time to time attend “roundtable” seminars with other property managers.
Marketing and Sales:
          Responding to the increased customer demand for services, we have implemented several programs expected to increase profitability. These programs include:
  -   A Customer Care Center (call center) that services new and existing customers’ inquiries and facilitates the capture of sales leads that were previously lost;
 
  -   Internet marketing, which provides customers information about all of our stores via numerous portals and e-mail;
 
  -   A rate management system, that matches product availability with market demand for each type of storage unit at each store, and determines appropriate pricing. The Company credits this program in achieving higher yields and controlling discounting;
 
  -   Dri-guard, that provides humidity-controlled spaces. We became the first self-storage operator to utilize this humidity protection technology. These environmental control systems are a premium storage feature intended to protect metal, electronics, furniture, fabrics and paper from moisture; and
 
  -   Uncle Bob’s trucks, that provide customers with convenient, affordable access to vehicles to help move-in their goods, and which also serve as moving billboards to help advertise our storage facilities.
Ancillary Income:
          Our stores are essentially retail operations and we have in excess of 160,000 customers. As a convenience to those customers, we sell items such as locks, boxes, tarps, etc. to make their storage experience easier. We also make available renters insurance through a third party carrier, on which we earn a commission. Income from incidental truck rentals, billboards and cell towers is also earned by our Company.
Information Systems:
          Our customized computer system performs billing, collections and reservation functions for each Property. It also tracks information used in developing marketing plans based on occupancy levels and tenant demographics and histories. The system generates daily, weekly and monthly financial reports for each Property that are transmitted to our principal office each night. The system also requires a property manager to input a descriptive explanation for all debit and credit transactions, paid-to-date changes, and all other discretionary activities, which allows the accounting staff at our principal office to promptly review all such transactions. Late charges are automatically imposed. More sensitive activities, such as rental rate changes and unit size or number changes, are completed only by Area Managers. Our customized management information system permits us to add new

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facilities to our portfolio with minimal additional overhead expense.
Property Maintenance:
          All of our Properties are subject to regular and routine maintenance procedures, which are designed to maintain the structure and appearance of our buildings and grounds. A staff headquartered in our principal office is responsible for the upkeep of the Properties, and all maintenance service is contracted through local providers, such as lawn service, snowplowing, pest control, gate maintenance, HVAC repairs, paving, painting, roofing, etc. A codified set of specifications has been designed and is applied to all work performed on our Uncle Bob’s stores. As with many other aspects of our Company, our size has allowed us to enjoy relatively low maintenance costs because we have the benefit of economies of scale in purchasing, travel and overhead absorption.
Environmental and Other Regulations
          We are subject to federal, state, and local environmental regulations that apply generally to the ownership of real property. We have not received notice from any governmental authority or private party of any material environmental noncompliance, claim, or liability in connection with any of the Properties, and are not aware of any environmental condition with respect to any of the Properties that could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations.
          The Properties are also generally subject to the same types of local regulations governing other real property, including zoning ordinances. We believe that the Properties are in substantial compliance with all such regulations.
Insurance
          Each of the Properties is covered by fire and property insurance (including comprehensive liability), and all-risk property insurance policies, which are provided by reputable companies and on commercially reasonable terms. In addition, we maintain a policy insuring against environmental liabilities resulting from tenant storage on terms customary for the industry, and title insurance insuring fee title to the Company-owned Properties in an amount that we believe to be adequate.
Federal Income Tax
          We operate, and intend to continue to operate, in such a manner as to continue to qualify as a REIT under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (the “Code”), but no assurance can be given that we will at all times so qualify. To the extent that we continue to qualify as a REIT, we will not be taxed, with certain limited exceptions, on the taxable income that is distributed to our shareholders. See Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations — Liquidity and Capital Resources — REIT Qualification and Distribution Requirements.”
Competition
          The primary factors upon which competition in the self-storage industry is based are location, rental rates, suitability of the property’s design to prospective customers’ needs, and the manner in which the property is operated and marketed. We believe we compete successfully on these bases. The extent of competition depends significantly on local market conditions. We seek to locate facilities so as not to cause our Properties to compete with one another for customers, but the number of self-storage facilities in a particular area could have a material adverse effect on the performance of any of the Properties.
          Several of our competitors, including Public Storage, U-Haul, and Extra Space Storage, are larger and have substantially greater financial resources than we do. These larger operators may, among other possible advantages, be capable of greater leverage and the payment of higher prices for acquisitions.

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Investment Policy
          While we emphasize equity real estate investments, we may, at our discretion, invest in mortgage and other real estate interests related to self-storage properties in a manner consistent with our qualification as a REIT. We may also retain a purchase money mortgage for a portion of the sale price in connection with the disposition of Properties from time to time. Should investment opportunities become available, we may look to acquire self-storage properties via a joint-venture partnership or similar entity. We may or may not elect to have a significant investment in such a venture, but would use such an opportunity to expand our portfolio of branded and managed properties.
          Subject to the percentage of ownership limitations and gross income tests necessary for REIT qualification, we also may invest in securities of entities engaged in real estate activities or securities of other issuers, including for the purpose of exercising control over such entities.
Disposition Policy
          We periodically review our Properties. Any disposition decision will be based on a variety of factors, including, but not limited to, the (i) potential to continue to increase cash flow and value, (ii) sale price, (iii) strategic fit with the rest of our portfolio, (iv) potential for, or existence of, environmental or regulatory issues, (v) alternative uses of capital, and (vi) maintaining qualification as a REIT.
          During 2008 we sold one non-strategic storage facility located in Michigan for net cash proceeds of $7.0 million resulting in a gain of $0.7 million. No storage facilities were sold in 2007 or 2006.
Distribution Policy
          We intend to pay regular quarterly distributions to our shareholders. However, future distributions by us will be at the discretion of the Board of Directors and will depend on the actual cash available for distribution, our financial condition and capital requirements, the annual distribution requirements under the REIT provisions of the Code and such other factors as the Board of Directors deems relevant. In order to maintain our qualification as a REIT, we must make annual distributions to shareholders of at least 90% of our REIT taxable income (which does not include capital gains). Under certain circumstances, we may be required to make distributions in excess of cash available for distribution in order to meet this requirement.
Borrowing Policy
          Our Board of Directors currently limits the amount of debt that may be incurred by us to less than 50% of the sum of the market value of our issued and outstanding Common and Preferred Stock plus our debt. We, however, may from time to time re-evaluate and modify our borrowing policy in light of then current economic conditions, relative costs of debt and equity capital, market values of properties, growth and acquisition opportunities and other factors.
          On June 25, 2008, we entered into agreements relating to new unsecured credit arrangements, and received funds under those arrangements. As part of the agreements, we entered into a $250 million unsecured term note maturing in June 2012 bearing interest at LIBOR plus 1.625%. The proceeds from this term note were used to repay the Company’s previous line of credit that was to mature in September 2008, the Company’s term note that was to mature in September 2009, the term note maturing in July 2008, and to provide for working capital. The new agreements also provide for a $125 million (expandable to $150 million) revolving line of credit maturing June 2011 bearing interest at a variable rate equal to LIBOR plus 1.375%, and requires a 0.25% facility fee. At December 31, 2008, there was $111 million available on the unsecured line of credit.
          We also maintain an $80 million term note maturing September 2013 bearing interest at a fixed rate of 6.26%, a $20 million term note maturing September 2013 bearing interest at a variable rate equal to LIBOR plus 1.50%, and a $150 million unsecured term note maturing in April 2016 bearing interest at 6.38%.

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          To the extent that we desire to obtain additional capital to pay distributions, to provide working capital, to pay existing indebtedness or to finance acquisitions, expansions or development of new properties, we may utilize amounts available under the expanded line of credit, common or preferred stock offerings, floating or fixed rate debt financing, retention of cash flow (subject to satisfying our distribution requirements under the REIT rules) or a combination of these methods. Additional debt financing may also be obtained through mortgages on our Properties, which may be recourse, non-recourse, or cross-collateralized and may contain cross-default provisions. We have not established any limit on the number or amount of mortgages that may be placed on any single Property or on our portfolio as a whole, although certain of our existing term loans contain limits on overall mortgage indebtedness. For additional information regarding borrowings, see Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Liquidity and Capital Resources” and Note 7 to the Consolidated Financial Statements filed herewith.
Employees
          We currently employ a total of 1,069 employees, including 385 property managers, 23 area managers, and 531 assistant managers and part-time employees. At our headquarters, in addition to our three senior executive officers, we employ 127 people engaged in various support activities, including accounting, customer care, and management information systems. None of our employees are covered by a collective bargaining agreement. We consider our employee relations to be excellent.
Available Information
          We file with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission quarterly and annual reports on Forms 10-Q and 10-K, respectively, current reports on Form 8-K, and proxy statements pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, in addition to other information as required. The public may read and copy any materials that we file with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE., Washington, D.C. 20549. The public may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1 (800) SEC-0330. We file this information with the SEC electronically, and the SEC maintains an Internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC at http://www.sec.gov. Our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and all amendments to those reports are available free of charge on our web site at http://www.sovranss.com as soon as reasonably practicable after such material is electronically filed with or furnished to the SEC. In addition, our codes of ethics and Charters of our Governance, Audit Committee, and Compensation Committee are available free of charge on our website at http://www.sovranss.com.
          Also, copies of our annual report and Charters of our Governance, Audit Committee, and Compensation Committee will be made available, free of charge, upon written request to Sovran Self Storage, Inc., Attn: Investor Relations, 6467 Main Street, Williamsville, NY 14221.
Item 1A. Risk Factors
          You should carefully consider the risks described below, together with all of the other information included in or incorporated by reference into our Form 10-K, as part of your evaluation of the Company. If any of the following risks actually occur, our business could be harmed. In such case, the trading price of our securities could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment.
Our Acquisitions May Not Perform as Anticipated
          We have completed many acquisitions of self-storage facilities since our initial public offering of common stock in June 1995. Our strategy is to continue to grow by acquiring additional self-storage facilities. Acquisitions entail risks that investments will fail to perform in accordance with our expectations and that our judgments with respect to the prices paid for acquired self-storage facilities and the costs of any improvements required to bring an acquired property up to standards established for the market position intended for that property will prove inaccurate. Acquisitions also involve general investment risks associated with any new real estate investment.

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We May Incur Problems with Our Real Estate Financing
          Unsecured Credit Facility. We have a line of credit with a syndicate of financial institutions. This unsecured credit facility is recourse to us and the required payments are not reduced if the economic performance of any of the properties declines. The unsecured credit facility limits our ability to make distributions to our shareholders, except in limited circumstances. If there is an event of default, our lenders may seek to exercise their rights under the unsecured credit facility, which could have a material adverse effect on us and our ability to make expected distributions to shareholders and distributions required by the real estate investment trust provisions of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986.
          Rising Interest Rates. Indebtedness that we incur under the unsecured credit facility and bank term note bears interest at a variable rate. Accordingly, increases in interest rates could increase our interest expense, which would reduce our cash available for distribution and our ability to pay expected distributions to our shareholders. We manage our exposure to rising interest rates using interest rate swaps and other available mechanisms. If the amount of our indebtedness bearing interest at a variable rate increases, our unsecured credit facility may require us to use those arrangements.
          Refinancing May Not Be Available. It may be necessary for us to refinance our unsecured credit facility through additional debt financing or equity offerings. If we were unable to refinance this indebtedness on acceptable terms, we might be forced to dispose of some of our self-storage facilities upon disadvantageous terms, which might result in losses to us and might adversely affect the cash available for distribution. If prevailing interest rates or other factors at the time of refinancing result in higher interest rates on refinancings, our interest expense would increase, which would adversely affect our cash available for distribution and our ability to pay expected distributions to shareholders.
          Recent turmoil in the credit markets could affect our ability to obtain debt financing on reasonable terms and have other adverse effects on us. The United States credit markets have recently experienced significant dislocations and liquidity disruptions which have caused the spreads on available debt financings to widen considerably. These circumstances have materially impacted liquidity in the debt markets, making financing terms for borrowers less attractive. A prolonged downturn in the credit markets could cause us to seek alternative sources of potentially less attractive financing, and may require us to adjust our business plan accordingly. Continued uncertainty in the credit markets may negatively impact our ability to make acquisitions.
Our Debt Levels May Increase
          Our Board of Directors currently has a policy of limiting the amount of our debt at the time of incurrence to less than 50% of the sum of the market value of our issued and outstanding common stock and preferred stock plus the amount of our debt at the time that debt is incurred. However, our organizational documents do not contain any limitation on the amount of indebtedness we might incur. Accordingly, our Board of Directors could alter or eliminate the current policy limitation on borrowing without a vote of our shareholders. We could become highly leveraged if this policy were changed. However, our ability to incur debt is limited by covenants in our bank credit arrangements.
We Are Subject to the Risks Posed by Fluctuating Demand and Significant Competition in the Self-Storage Industry
          Our self-storage facilities are subject to all operating risks common to the self-storage industry. These risks include but are not limited to the following:
    Decreases in demand for rental spaces in a particular locale;
 
    Changes in supply of similar or competing self-storage facilities in an area;
 
    Changes in market rental rates; and
 
    Inability to collect rents from customers.

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          Our current strategy is to acquire interests only in self-storage facilities. Consequently, we are subject to risks inherent in investments in a single industry. Our self-storage facilities compete with other self-storage facilities in their geographic markets. As a result of competition, the self-storage facilities could experience a decrease in occupancy levels and rental rates, which would decrease our cash available for distribution. We compete in operations and for acquisition opportunities with companies that have substantial financial resources. Competition may reduce the number of suitable acquisition opportunities offered to us and increase the bargaining power of property owners seeking to sell. The self-storage industry has at times experienced overbuilding in response to perceived increases in demand. A recurrence of overbuilding might cause us to experience a decrease in occupancy levels, limit our ability to increase rents and compel us to offer discounted rents.
Our Real Estate Investments Are Illiquid and Are Subject to Uninsurable Risks and Government Regulation
          General Risks. Our investments are subject to varying degrees of risk generally related to the ownership of real property. The underlying value of our real estate investments and our income and ability to make distributions to our shareholders are dependent upon our ability to operate the self-storage facilities in a manner sufficient to maintain or increase cash available for distribution. Income from our self-storage facilities may be adversely affected by the following factors:
    Changes in national economic conditions;
 
    Changes in general or local economic conditions and neighborhood characteristics;
 
    Competition from other self-storage facilities;
 
    Changes in interest rates and in the availability, cost and terms of financing;
 
    The impact of present or future environmental legislation and compliance with environmental laws;
 
    The ongoing need for capital improvements, particularly in older facilities;
 
    Changes in real estate tax rates and other operating expenses;
 
    Adverse changes in governmental rules and fiscal policies;
 
    Uninsured losses resulting from casualties associated with civil unrest, acts of God, including natural disasters, and acts of war;
 
    Adverse changes in zoning laws; and
 
    Other factors that are beyond our control.
          Illiquidity of Real Estate May Limit its Value. Real estate investments are relatively illiquid. Our ability to vary our portfolio of self-storage facilities in response to changes in economic and other conditions is limited. In addition, provisions of the Code may limit our ability to profit on the sale of self-storage facilities held for fewer than four years. We may be unable to dispose of a facility when we find disposition advantageous or necessary and the sale price of any disposition may not equal or exceed the amount of our investment.
          Uninsured and Underinsured Losses Could Reduce the Value of our Self Storage Facilities. Some losses, generally of a catastrophic nature, that we potentially face with respect to our self-storage facilities may be uninsurable or not insurable at an acceptable cost. Our management uses its discretion in determining amounts, coverage limits and deductibility provisions of insurance, with a view to acquiring appropriate insurance on our investments at a reasonable cost and on suitable terms. These decisions may result in insurance coverage that, in the event of a substantial loss, would not be sufficient to pay the full current market value or current replacement cost of our lost investment. Inflation, changes in building codes and ordinances, environmental considerations, and other

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factors also might make it infeasible to use insurance proceeds to replace a property after it has been damaged or destroyed. Under those circumstances, the insurance proceeds received by us might not be adequate to restore our economic position with respect to a particular property.
          Possible Liability Relating to Environmental Matters. Under various federal, state and local environmental laws, ordinances and regulations, a current or previous owner or operator of real property may be liable for the costs of removal or remediation of hazardous or toxic substances on, under or in that property. Those laws often impose liability even if the owner or operator did not cause or know of the presence of hazardous or toxic substances and even if the storage of those substances was in violation of a tenant’s lease. In addition, the presence of hazardous or toxic substances, or the failure of the owner to address their presence on the property, may adversely affect the owner’s ability to borrow using that real property as collateral. In connection with the ownership of the self-storage facilities, we may be potentially liable for any of those costs.
          Americans with Disabilities Act. The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or ADA, generally requires that buildings be made accessible to persons with disabilities. A determination that we are not in compliance with the ADA could result in imposition of fines or an award of damages to private litigants. If we were required to make modifications to comply with the ADA, our results of operations and ability to make expected distributions to our shareholders could be adversely affected.
There Are Limitations on the Ability to Change Control of Sovran
          Limitation on Ownership and Transfer of Shares. To maintain our qualification as a REIT, not more than 50% in value of our outstanding shares of stock may be owned, directly or indirectly, by five or fewer individuals, as defined in the Code. To limit the possibility that we will fail to qualify as a REIT under this test, our Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation include ownership limits and transfer restrictions on shares of our stock. Our Articles of Incorporation limit ownership of our issued and outstanding stock by any single shareholder to 9.8% of the aggregate value of our outstanding stock, except that the ownership by some of our shareholders is limited to 15%.
          These ownership limits may:
    Have the effect of precluding an acquisition of control of Sovran by a third party without consent of our Board of Directors even if the change in control would be in the interest of shareholders; and
 
    Limit the opportunity for shareholders to receive a premium for shares of our common stock they hold that might otherwise exist if an investor were attempting to assemble a block of common stock in excess of 9.8% or 15%, as the case may be, of the outstanding shares of our stock or to otherwise effect a change in control of Sovran.
          Our Board of Directors may waive the ownership limits if it is satisfied that ownership by those shareholders in excess of those limits will not jeopardize our status as a REIT under the Code or in the event it determines that it is no longer in our best interests to be a REIT. Waivers have been granted to the former holders of our Series C preferred stock, FMR Corporation and Cohen & Steers, Inc. A transfer of our common stock and/or preferred stock to a person who, as a result of the transfer, violates the ownership limits may not be effective under some circumstances.
          Other Limitations. Other limitations could have the effect of discouraging a takeover or other transaction in which holders of some, or a majority, of our outstanding common stock might receive a premium for their shares of our common stock that exceeds the then prevailing market price or that those holders might believe to be otherwise in their best interest. The issuance of additional shares of preferred stock could have the effect of delaying or preventing a change in control of Sovran even if a change in control were in the shareholders’ interest. In addition, the Maryland General Corporation Law, or MGCL, imposes restrictions and requires that specified procedures with respect to the acquisition of stated levels of share ownership and business combinations, including combinations with interested shareholders. These provisions of the MGCL could have the effect of delaying or preventing a change in control of Sovran even if a change in control were in the shareholders’ interest. Waivers and exemptions have been granted to the initial purchasers of our former Series C preferred stock in connection with

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these provisions of the MGCL. In addition, under the Partnership’s agreement of limited partnership, in general, we may not merge, consolidate or engage in any combination with another person or sell all or substantially all of our assets unless that transaction includes the merger or sale of all or substantially all of the assets of the Partnership, which requires the approval of the holders of 75% of the limited partnership interests thereof. If we were to own less than 75% of the limited partnership interests in the Partnership, this provision of the limited partnership agreement could have the effect of delaying or preventing us from engaging in some change of control transactions.
Our Failure to Qualify as a REIT Would Have Adverse Consequences
          We intend to operate in a manner that will permit us to qualify as a REIT under the Code. Qualification as a REIT involves the application of highly technical and complex Code provisions for which there are only limited judicial and administrative interpretations. Continued qualification as a REIT depends upon our continuing ability to meet various requirements concerning, among other things, the ownership of our outstanding stock, the nature of our assets, the sources of our income and the amount of our distributions to our shareholders.
          In addition, a REIT is limited with respect to the services it can provide for its tenants. We have provided certain conveniences for our tenants, including property insurance underwritten by a third party insurance company that pays us commissions. We believe the insurance provided by the insurance company would not constitute a prohibited service to our tenants. No assurances can be given, however, that the IRS will not challenge our position. If the IRS successfully challenged our position, our qualification as a REIT could be adversely affected.
          If we were to fail to qualify as a REIT in any taxable year, we would not be allowed a deduction for distributions to shareholders in computing our taxable income and would be subject to federal income tax (including any applicable alternative minimum tax) on our taxable income at regular corporate rates. Unless entitled to relief under certain Code provisions, we also would be ineligible for qualification as a REIT for the four taxable years following the year during which our qualification was lost. As a result, distributions to the shareholders would be reduced for each of the years involved. Although we currently intend to operate in a manner designed to qualify as a REIT, it is possible that future economic, market, legal, tax or other considerations may cause our Board of Directors to revoke our REIT election.
Market Interest Rates May Influence the Price of Our Common Stock
          One of the factors that may influence the price of our common stock in public trading markets or in private transactions is the annual yield on our common stock as compared to yields on other financial instruments. An increase in market interest rates will result in higher yields on other financial instruments, which could adversely affect the price of our common stock.
Regional Concentration of Our Business May Subject Us to Economic Downturns in the States of Texas and Florida.
          As of December 31, 2008, 147 of our 385 self-storage facilities are located in the states of Texas and Florida. For the year ended December 31, 2008, these facilities accounted for approximately 40.9% of store revenues. This concentration of business in Texas and Florida exposes us to potential losses resulting from a downturn in the economies of those states. If economic conditions in those states continue to deteriorate, we will experience a reduction in existing and new business, which may have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Changes in Taxation of Corporate Dividends May Adversely Affect the Value of Our Common Stock
          The maximum marginal rate of tax payable by domestic noncorporate taxpayers on dividends received from a regular “C” corporation under current law is 15% through 2010, as opposed to higher ordinary income rates. The reduced tax rate, however, does not apply to distributions paid to domestic noncorporate taxpayers by a REIT on its stock, except for certain limited amounts. Although the earnings of a REIT that are distributed to its stockholders generally remain subject to less federal income taxation than earnings of a non-REIT “C” corporation that are distributed to its stockholders net of corporate-level income tax, legislation that extends the application of the 15% rate to dividends paid after 2010 by “C” corporations could cause domestic noncorporate investors to view

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the stock of regular “C” corporations as more attractive relative to the stock of a REIT, because the dividends from regular “C” corporations would continue to be taxed at a lower rate while distributions from REITs (other than distributions designated as capital gain dividends) are generally taxed at the same rate as the individual’s other ordinary income.
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
          None.

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Item 2. Properties
          At December 31, 2008, we held ownership interests in and managed a total of 385 Properties situated in twenty-four states. Among the 385 self-storage facilities are 27 properties that we manage for a consolidated joint venture of which we are a majority owner and 25 properties that we manage for a joint venture of which we are a 20% owner.
          Our self-storage facilities offer inexpensive, easily accessible, enclosed storage space to residential and commercial users on a month-to-month basis. Most of our Properties are fenced with computerized gates and are well lighted. A majority of the Properties are single-story, thereby providing customers with the convenience of direct vehicle access to their storage spaces. Our stores range in size from 21,000 to 187,000 net rentable square feet, with an average of approximately 65,000 net rentable square feet. The Properties generally are constructed of masonry or steel walls resting on concrete slabs and have standing seam metal, shingle, or tar and gravel roofs. All Properties have a property manager on-site during business hours. Customers have access to their storage areas during business hours, and some commercial customers are provided 24-hour access. Individual storage spaces are secured by a lock furnished by the customer to provide the customer with control of access to the space.
          All of the Properties conduct business under the user-friendly name Uncle Bob’s Self-Storage ®.
          The following table provides certain information regarding the Properties in which we have an ownership interest and manage as of December 31, 2008:
                                 
    Number of                    
    Stores at                   Percentage
    December 31,   Square   Number of   of Store
    2008   Feet   Spaces   Revenue
Alabama
    22       1,602,986       11,885       5.1 %
Arizona
    9       506,034       4,474       2.4 %
Connecticut
    5       304,859       2,866       2.1 %
Colorado
    4       276,827       2,376       0.5 %
Florida
    57       3,652,019       33,327       15.6 %
Georgia
    27       1,717,646       13,937       6.3 %
Kentucky
    2       145,708       1,322       0.3 %
Louisiana
    14       867,593       7,744       3.7 %
Maine
    2       114,145       1,004       0.5 %
Maryland
    4       173,181       2,040       0.9 %
Massachusetts
    14       790,282       7,178       3.8 %
Michigan
    6       348,843       3,010       1.2 %
Mississippi
    12       925,621       7,079       3.5 %
Missouri
    7       436,069       3,786       2.1 %
New Hampshire
    4       260,503       2,330       1.0 %
New York
    28       1,598,164       14,501       8.6 %
North Carolina
    15       796,123       6,959       3.2 %
Ohio
    23       1,576,639       12,900       4.4 %
Pennsylvania
    6       365,520       2,919       1.4 %
Rhode Island
    4       167,901       1,567       0.9 %
South Carolina
    8       445,528       3,770       1.8 %
Tennessee
    4       295,122       2,430       1.0 %
Texas
    90       6,571,320       53,847       25.3 %
Virginia
    18       1,065,013       9,896       4.4 %
 
                               
Total
    385       25,003,646       213,147       100.0 %
 
                               

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          At December 31, 2008, the Properties had an average occupancy of 80.5% and an annualized rent per occupied square foot of $10.54.
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
          In the normal course of business, we are subject to various claims and litigation. While the outcome of any litigation is inherently unpredictable, we do not believe that any matters currently pending against the Company will have a material adverse impact on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
Item 4. Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders
          No matters were submitted during the fourth quarter of the fiscal year covered by this report to a vote of security holders, through the solicitation of proxies or otherwise.
Part II
Item 5.   Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
          Our Common Stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “SSS.” Set forth below are the high and low sales prices for our Common Stock for each full quarterly period within the two most recent fiscal years.
                 
Quarter 2007   High   Low
1st
  $ 63.93     $ 54.98  
2nd
    56.56       47.18  
3rd
    50.25       40.40  
4th
    50.43       39.75  
                 
Quarter 2008   High   Low
1st
  $ 44.62     $ 33.56  
2nd
    46.50       41.37  
3rd
    46.15       35.77  
4th
    44.16       19.18  
          As of February 15, 2009, there were approximately 1,316 holders of record of our Common Stock.
          We have paid quarterly dividends to our shareholders since our inception. Reflected in the table below are the dividends paid in the last two years.
          For federal income tax purposes, distributions to shareholders are treated as ordinary income, capital gain, return of capital or a combination thereof. Distributions to shareholders for 2008 represent 76.5% ordinary income, 1.5% section 1250 capital gain, and 22% return of capital.
History of Dividends Declared on Common Stock
     
1st Quarter, 2007
  $0.620 per share
2nd Quarter, 2007
  $0.620 per share
3rd Quarter, 2007
  $0.630 per share
4th Quarter, 2007
  $0.630 per share
 
1st Quarter, 2008
  $0.630 per share
2nd Quarter, 2008
  $0.630 per share
3rd Quarter, 2008
  $0.640 per share
4th Quarter, 2008
  $0.640 per share

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EQUITY COMPENSATION PLAN INFORMATION
          The following table sets forth certain information as of December 31, 2008, with respect to equity compensation plans under which shares of the Company’s Common Stock may be issued.
                         
    Number of        
    securities to be        
    issued upon   Weighted average   Number of
    exercise of   exercise price of   securities
    outstanding   outstanding   remaining available
    options, warrants   options, warrants   for future issuance
Plan Category   and rights (#)   and rights ($)   (#)
Equity compensation plans approved by shareholders:
                       
2005 Award and Option Plan
    274,163     $ 45.72       1,096,464  
1995 Award and Option Plan
    50,525     $ 26.74       0  
1995 Outside Directors’ Stock Option Plan
    36,000     $ 45.74       0  
Deferred Compensation Plan for Directors (1)
    33,512       N/A       35,347  
Equity compensation plans not approved by shareholders:
    N/A       N/A       N/A  
 
(1)   Under the Deferred Compensation Plan for Directors, non-employee Directors may defer all or part of their Directors’ fees that are otherwise payable in cash. Directors’ fees that are deferred under the Plan will be credited to each Directors’ account under the Plan in the form of Units. The number of Units credited is determined by dividing the amount of Directors’ fees deferred by the closing price of the Company’s Common Stock on the New York Stock Exchange on the day immediately preceding the day upon which Directors’ fees otherwise would be paid by the Company. A Director is credited with additional Units for dividends on the shares of Common Stock represented by Units in such Directors’ Account. A Director may elect to receive the shares in a lump sum on a date specified by the Director or in quarterly or annual installments over a specified period and commencing on a specified date.

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CORPORATE PERFORMANCE GRAPH
          The following chart and line-graph presentation compares (i) the Company’s shareholder return on an indexed basis since December 31, 2003 with (ii) the S&P Stock Index and (iii) the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts Equity Index.
(PERFORMANCE GRAPH)
CUMULATIVE TOTAL SHAREHOLDER RETURN
SOVRAN SELF STORAGE, INC.
DECEMBER 31, 2003 - DECEMBER 31, 2008
                                                 
    Dec. 31,     Dec. 31,     Dec. 31,     Dec. 31,     Dec. 31,     Dec. 31,  
    2003     2004     2005     2006     2007     2008  
S&P
    100.00       110.87       116.32       134.69       142.09       89.52  
NAREIT
    100.00       131.58       147.59       199.33       168.05       104.65  
SSS
    100.00       119.93       141.39       180.83       132.79       126.89  
The foregoing item assumes $100.00 invested on December 31, 2003, with dividends reinvested.

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Item 6. Selected Financial Data
          The following selected financial and operating information should be read in conjunction with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” and the financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K:
                                         
(dollars in thousands, except per   At or For Year Ended December 31,
     share data)   2008   2007   2006   2005   2004
Operating Data
                                       
Operating revenues
  $ 203,003     $ 192,857     $ 165,369     $ 137,373     $ 122,381  
Income from continuing operations
    36,605       38,780       36,163       34,318       30,232  
Income from discontinued operations (1)
    794       434       447       472       1,772  
Net income
    37,399       39,214       36,610       34,790       32,004  
Income from continuing operations per common share — diluted
    1.68       1.79       1.87       1.81       1.41  
Net income per common share — basic
    1.72       1.81       1.90       1.86       1.54  
Net income per common share — diluted
    1.72       1.81       1.89       1.84       1.53  
Dividends declared per common share
    2.54       2.50       2.47       2.44       2.42  
 
                                       
Balance Sheet Data
                                       
Investment in storage facilities at cost
  $ 1,389,201     $ 1,322,708     $ 1,136,052     $ 886,191     $ 804,106  
Total assets
    1,212,626       1,164,588       1,053,159       784,319       719,514  
Total debt
    623,261       566,517       462,027       339,144       289,075  
Total liabilities
    692,479       610,757       495,301       364,980       315,049  
Series C preferred stock
                26,613       26,613       53,227  
 
                                       
Other Data
                                       
Net cash provided by operating activities
  $ 77,132     $ 85,175     $ 64,656     $ 60,724     $ 54,803  
Net cash used in investing activities
    (82,711 )     (190,267 )     (176,567 )     (79,156 )     (71,034 )
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities
    6,055       61,372       154,730       20,238       (765 )
 
(1)   In 2008 we sold one store and in 2004 we sold five stores whose operations and gain are classified as discontinued operations for all previous years presented.

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Item 7.   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
          The following discussion and analysis of the consolidated financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and notes thereto included elsewhere in this report.
Disclosure Regarding Forward-Looking Statements
          When used in this discussion and elsewhere in this document, the words “intends,” “believes,” “expects,” “anticipates,” and similar expressions are intended to identify “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of that term in Section 27A of the Securities Exchange Act of 1933 and in Section 21E of the Securities Act of 1934. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, which may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such factors include, but are not limited to, the effect of competition from new self-storage facilities, which would cause rents and occupancy rates to decline; our ability to evaluate, finance and integrate acquired businesses into our existing business and operations; our ability to effectively compete in the industry in which we do business; our existing indebtedness may mature in an unfavorable credit environment, preventing refinancing or forcing refinancing of the indebtedness on terms that are not as favorable as the existing terms; interest rates may fluctuate, impacting costs associated with our outstanding floating rate debt; our reliance on our call center; our cash flow may be insufficient to meet required payments of principal, interest and dividends; and tax law changes that may change the taxability of future income.
Business and Overview
          We believe we are the fifth largest operator of self-storage properties in the United States based on facilities owned and managed. All of our stores are operated under the user-friendly name “Uncle Bob’s Self-Storage” ®.
Operating Strategy
Our operating strategy is designed to generate growth and enhance value by:
  A.   Increasing operating performance and cash flow through aggressive management of our stores:
  -   Revenues continue to improve as a result of drivers implemented by us, including:
  -   Our Customer Care Center, which answers sales inquiries and makes reservations for all of our properties on a centralized basis,
 
  -   The Uncle Bob’s truck move-in program, under which, at present, 259 of our stores offer a free Uncle Bob’s truck to assist our customers in moving into their spaces, and
 
  -   An increase in internet marketing and sales.
  -   In addition to increasing revenue, we have worked to improve services and amenities at our stores. While this has caused operating expenses to increase over the past five years, it has resulted in a superior storage experience for our customers. Our managers are better qualified and receive a significantly higher level of training than they did five years ago, customer access and security are greatly enhanced as a result of advances in technology, and property appearance and functionality have been improved.
 
  -   Our customized property management systems enable us to improve our ability to track trends, set optimal pricing levels, enjoy considerable economies of scale in vendor and supply pricing, and control collections and accounts receivable.

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  B.   Acquiring additional stores:
  -   In conjunction with the joint venture agreement entered in late May 2008, potential acquisition opportunities over the first nine months of the agreement will be offered to the joint venture. The Company’s acquisitions over this period will therefore be limited to facilities that do not fit the joint venture’s investment objectives, but do meet ours.
 
  -   Our objective is to acquire new stores one or two at a time in markets we currently operate in. By so doing, we can add to our existing base, which should improve market penetration in those areas, and contribute to the benefits achieved from economies of scale.
 
  -   We may also enter new markets if we can do so by acquiring a group of stores in those markets. We feel that our marketing efforts and control systems would enhance even those portfolios that have been managed efficiently by independent operators, and that attractive returns can be generated by such acquisitions.
  C.   Expanding our management business:
  -   We see our management business as a source of future acquisitions. We may develop additional joint ventures in which we are minority owners and managers of the self-storage facilities acquired by these joint ventures. The joint venture agreements will give us first right of refusal to purchase the managed properties in the event they are offered for sale.
  D.   Expanding and enhancing our existing stores:
  -   Over the past four years, we have undertaken an announced program of expanding and enhancing our properties. Primarily, we have worked to add premium storage (i.e., air-conditioned and/or humidity controlled) space to our portfolio. In 2007, we expended approximately $25 million to add some 444,000 square feet of such space to our properties; in 2008, we spent approximately $26 million to add 403,000 square feet and to convert 95,000 square feet to premium storage. The program entailed construction of new buildings, acquisition of parcels of land contiguous to stores deemed suitable for expansion, and demolition of certain structures to make room for more optimally configured spaces. In 2009, we expect to curtail our expansion program with new expenditures of approximately $15 million on projects that began in 2008.
Supply and Demand
          We believe the supply and demand model in the self-storage industry is micro market specific in that a majority of our business comes from within a five mile radius of our stores. The current turmoil in the credit markets has resulted in a decrease in new supply on a national basis. With the decrease of debt and equity capital brought about by the credit market tightening in the past year, we have seen capitalization rates on acquisitions (expected annual return on investment) increase to approximately 7.5% and expect continued increases in 2009. From 2003 to 2007 the historically low interest rates available to developers resulted in increased supply on a national basis. We experienced some of this excess supply in certain markets in Texas and Florida from 2003 to 2007, but because of the demand model, we did not see a widespread effect on our stores in those years. In 2008, the Florida market was negatively effected by the current economic downturn and we expect many markets will be effected in 2009 as consumers continue to pull back spending.
Operating Trends
          In 2008 and 2007, our industry experienced some softness in demand. This was due to the economic slowdown that began in late 2007, and in part to regional issues, such as the reduction of hurricane driven demand in Florida and the Gulf Coast states, and to an overall slowdown in the housing sector. We believe the housing slowdown has impacted our industry in two ways: 1.) a reduction in lease-up activity resulting from fewer residential real estate transactions (both buyers and sellers of residences use our product in times of transition) and 2.) a contraction of housing construction activity which has reduced the number of people working in the

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construction trades (trades people are a measurable part of our usual tenant base.)
          While we enjoyed same store revenue growth of approximately 3% to 5% in each of the prior five years, we were only able to achieve 0.5% same store revenue growth in 2008, primarily because of the aforementioned issues. We expect conditions in most of our markets to remain challenging and are forecasting -1% to -2% revenue growth on a same store basis in 2009.
          Expenses related to operating a self-storage facility have increased substantially over the last five years as a result of expanded hours, increased health care costs, property insurance costs, and the costs of amenities (such as Uncle Bob’s trucks). While we do not foresee further expansion of our cost base, we do expect the trend of increasing expenses to continue at a pace commensurate with CPI growth. Because almost all of our costs are fixed, should revenue growth fall significantly, operating margins will be reduced.
Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
          The discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the amounts reported in our financial statements and the accompanying notes. On an on-going basis, we evaluate our estimates and judgments, including those related to carrying values of storage facilities, bad debts, and contingencies and litigation. We base these estimates on experience and on various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.
          Carrying value of storage facilities: We believe our judgment regarding the impairment of the carrying value of our storage facilities is a critical accounting policy. Our policy is to assess any impairment of value whenever events or circumstances indicate that the carrying value of a storage facility may not be recoverable. Such events or circumstances would include negative operating cash flow or significant declining revenue per storage facility. Impairment is evaluated based upon comparing the sum of the expected undiscounted future cash flows to the carrying value of the storage facility, on a property by property basis. If the sum of the undiscounted cash flow is less than the carrying amount, an impairment loss is recognized for the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds the fair value of the asset. If cash flow projections are inaccurate and in the future it is determined that storage facility carrying values are not recoverable, impairment charges may be required at that time and could materially affect our operating results and financial position. At December 31, 2008 and 2007, no assets had been determined to be impaired under this policy.
          Estimated useful lives of long-lived assets: We believe that the estimated lives used for our depreciable, long-lived assets is a critical accounting policy. Changes in estimated useful lives of these assets could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition or results of operations.
          Qualification as a REIT: We operate, and intend to continue to operate, as a REIT under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (the Code), but no assurance can be given that we will at all times so qualify. To the extent that we continue to qualify as a REIT, we will not be taxed, with certain limited exceptions, on the taxable income that is distributed to our shareholders. If we fail to qualify as a REIT, any requirement to pay federal income taxes could have a material adverse impact on our financial conditions and results of operations.
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2008 COMPARED TO
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2007
          We recorded rental revenues of $195.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2008, an increase of $8.6 million or 4.6% when compared to 2007 rental revenues of $186.6 million. Of the increase in rental revenue, $1.2 million resulted from a 0.7% increase in rental revenues at the 326 core properties considered in same store sales (those properties included in the consolidated results of operations since January 1, 2007). The increase in same store rental revenues was achieved primarily through rate increases on select units averaging 1.9%, offset by a decrease in square foot occupancy of 150 basis points, which we believe resulted from general economic conditions,

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in particular the housing sector. The remaining $7.4 million increase in rental revenues resulted from the acquisition of three stores during 2008 and from having the 31 stores acquired in 2007 included for a full year of operations. Other income, which includes merchandise sales, insurance commissions, truck rentals, management fees and acquisition fees, increased in 2008 primarily as a result of $1.1 million of management and acquisition fees generated from our unconsolidated joint venture, Sovran HHF Storage Holdings LLC.
          Property operating and real estate tax expense increased $5.1 million, or 7.3%, in 2008 compared to 2007. Of this increase, $2.7 million were expenses incurred by the facilities acquired in 2008 and from having expenses from the 2007 acquisitions included for a full year of operations. $2.4 million of the increase was due to increased payroll, property taxes, utilities, and maintenance expenses at the 326 core properties considered same stores. We expect same-store operating costs to increase only moderately in 2009 with increases primarily attributable to utilities and property taxes.
          General and administrative expenses increased $2.0 million or 13.4% from 2007 to 2008. The increase primarily resulted from the costs associated with operating the properties acquired in 2008 and 2007, and from managing the 25 properties acquired by our joint venture in 2008.
          Depreciation and amortization expense increased to $34.4 million in 2008 from $33.9 million in 2007, primarily as a result of additional depreciation taken on real estate assets acquired in 2008, and a full year of depreciation on 2007 acquisitions, offset by a decrease in amortization of in-place customers leases relating to these acquisitions.
          Interest expense increased from $33.9 million in 2007 to $38.1 million in 2008 as a result of additional borrowings under our line of credit and term notes to purchase three stores in 2008, as well as an increase in interest rates as a result of our debt refinancing in June 2008.
          As described in Note 5 to the financial statements, in 2008, the Company sold one non-strategic storage facility located in Michigan for net cash proceeds of $7.0 million resulting in a gain of $0.7 million. The 2007 operations of this facility are reported as discontinued operations.
          The decrease in preferred stock dividends from 2007 to 2008 was a result of the conversion of all remaining 1,200,000 shares of our Series C Preferred Stock into 920,244 shares of common stock in July 2007.
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2007 COMPARED TO
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2006
          We recorded rental revenues of $186.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2007, an increase of $26.6 million or 16.6% when compared to 2006 rental revenues of $160.0 million. Of the increase in rental revenue, $4.8 million resulted from a 3.2% increase in rental revenues at the 284 core properties considered in same store sales (those properties included in the consolidated results of operations since January 1, 2006). The increase in same store rental revenues was achieved primarily through rate increases on select units averaging 4.4%, offset by a decrease in square foot occupancy of 175 basis points, which we believe resulted from general economic conditions, in particular the housing sector, and the return to normalcy in Florida after the hurricanes. As of April 1, 2006, the consolidated income statement includes the results of a previously unconsolidated joint venture (Locke Sovran I, LLC) that has been consolidated as a result of an additional investment in that entity by us. The rental income related to Locke Sovran I that was included in our results for the year ended December 31, 2007 was $1.7 million higher than that included in 2006 as a result of the consolidation in April 2006. The remaining $20.1 million increase in rental revenues resulted from the acquisition of 31 stores during 2007 and from having the 42 stores acquired in 2006 included for a full year of operations. Other income increased $0.9 million due to increased merchandise and insurance sales and the additional incidental revenue generated by truck rentals.
          Property operating and real estate tax expense increased $10.7 million, or 18.1%, in 2007 compared to 2006. Of this increase, $8.2 million were expenses incurred by the facilities acquired in 2007 and from having expenses from the 2006 acquisitions included for a full year of operations. $1.9 million of the increase was due to increased property insurance, utilities, maintenance expenses, and increased property taxes at the 284 core properties

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considered same stores. The property operating and real estate tax expense related to Locke Sovran I that was included in our results for the year ended December 31, 2007, was $0.6 million higher than that included in 2006 as a result of the consolidation in April 2006.
          General and administrative expenses increased $1.1 million or 8.1% from 2006 to 2007. The increase primarily resulted from the costs associated with operating the properties acquired in 2007 and 2006.
          Depreciation and amortization expense increased to $33.9 million in 2007 from $25.2 million in 2006, primarily as a result of additional depreciation taken on real estate assets acquired in 2007, a full year of depreciation on 2006 acquisitions, and the amortization of in-place customers leases relating to these acquisitions.
          Interest expense increased from $29.5 million in 2006 to $33.9 million in 2007 as a result of higher interest rates, additional borrowings under our line of credit and term notes to purchase 31 stores in 2007, and the consolidation of Locke Sovran I, LLC as of April 1, 2006.
          The casualty gain recorded in 2007 relates to insurance proceeds received in excess of the carrying value of a building damaged by a fire at one of our facilities.
          The decrease in preferred stock dividends from 2006 to 2007 was a result of the conversion of all remaining 1,200,000 shares of our Series C Preferred Stock into 920,244 shares of common stock in July 2007.
FUNDS FROM OPERATIONS
          We believe that Funds from Operations (“FFO”) provides relevant and meaningful information about our operating performance that is necessary, along with net earnings and cash flows, for an understanding of our operating results. FFO adds back historical cost depreciation, which assumes the value of real estate assets diminishes predictably in the future. In fact, real estate asset values increase or decrease with market conditions. Consequently, we believe FFO is a useful supplemental measure in evaluating our operating performance by disregarding (or adding back) historical cost depreciation.
          FFO is defined by the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts, Inc. (“NAREIT”) as net income computed in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”), excluding gains or losses on sales of properties, plus depreciation and amortization and after adjustments to record unconsolidated partnerships and joint ventures on the same basis. We believe that to further understand our performance, FFO should be compared with our reported net income and cash flows in accordance with GAAP, as presented in our consolidated financial statements.
          Our computation of FFO may not be comparable to FFO reported by other REITs or real estate companies that do not define the term in accordance with the current NAREIT definition or that interpret the current NAREIT definition differently. FFO does not represent cash generated from operating activities determined in accordance with GAAP, and should not be considered as an alternative to net income (determined in accordance with GAAP) as an indication of our performance, as an alternative to net cash flows from operating activities (determined in accordance with GAAP) as a measure of our liquidity, or as an indicator of our ability to make cash distributions.

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Reconciliation of Net Income to Funds From Operations
                                         
    For Year Ended December 31,
(dollars in thousands)   2008   2007   2006   2005   2004
Net income
  $ 37,399     $ 39,214     $ 36,610     $ 34,790     $ 32,004  
Minority interest in income
    2,284       2,631       2,434       1,529       1,542  
Depreciation of real estate and amortization of intangible assets exclusive of deferred financing fees
    34,421       33,851       25,121       21,040       19,002  
Depreciation of real estate included in discontinued operations
    46       185       184       182       263  
Depreciation and amortization from unconsolidated joint ventures
    333       59       168       484       473  
Casualty gain
          (114 )                  
Gain on sale of real estate
    (716 )                       (1,137 )
Preferred stock dividends
          (1,256 )     (2,512 )     (4,123 )     (7,168 )
Redemption amount in excess of carrying value of Series B Preferred Stock
                            (1,415 )
Funds from operations allocable to minority interest in Operating Partnership
    (1,366 )     (1,425 )     (1,450 )     (1,519 )     (1,333 )
Funds from operations allocable to minority interest in Locke Sovran I and Locke Sovran II
    (1,564 )     (1,848 )     (1,785 )     (1,499 )     (1,475 )
 
                                       
Funds from operations available to common shareholders
  $ 70,837     $ 71,297     $ 58,770     $ 50,884     $ 40,756  
LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES
          Our ability to retain cash flow is limited because we operate as a REIT. In order to maintain our REIT status, a substantial portion of our operating cash flow must be used to pay dividends to our shareholders. We believe that our internally generated net cash provided by operating activities and our availability on our line of credit will continue to be sufficient to fund ongoing operations, capital improvements, dividends and debt service requirements through June 2011, at which time our revolving line of credit matures.
          Cash flows from operating activities were $77.1 million, $85.2 million and $64.7 million for the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007, and 2006, respectively. The decrease in operating cash flows from 2007 to 2008 was primarily due to a decrease in net income and accounts payable remaining consistent from year to year. The increase in operating cash from 2006 to 2007 was primarily attributable to increased net income, increased non-cash charges for depreciation and amortization, an increase in accounts payable related to property taxes, and a decrease in prepaid insurance.
          Cash used in investing activities was $82.7 million, $190.3 million, and $176.6 million for the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007, and 2006 respectively. The decrease in cash used from 2007 to 2008 was attributable to reduced acquisition activity in 2008 as many of the properties acquired were acquired through a joint venture of which we are a 20% owner. The increase from 2006 to 2007 was due to increased acquisition activity, an increase in improvements to existing facilities, and additional investment in our consolidated joint ventures.
          Cash provided by financing activities was $6.0 million in 2008 compared to $61.4 million in 2007 and $154.7 million in 2006, respectively. Our reduced acquisition activity in 2008 was the driver behind the decrease in cash provided from financing activities from 2007 to 2008. The decrease in cash provided from financing activities from 2006 to 2007 was a result of the proceeds received from our common stock offering in December of 2006 noted below.
          On June 25, 2008, we entered into agreements relating to new unsecured credit arrangements, and received

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funds under those arrangements. As part of the agreements, we entered into a $250 million unsecured term note maturing in June 2012 bearing interest at LIBOR plus 1.625%. The proceeds from this term note were used to repay the Company’s previous line of credit that was to mature in September 2008, the Company’s term note that was to mature in September 2009, the term note maturing in July 2008, and to provide for working capital. The new agreements also provide for a $125 million (expandable to $150 million) revolving line of credit maturing June 2011 bearing interest at a variable rate equal to LIBOR plus 1.375%, and requires a 0.25% facility fee. The revolving line of credit maturity can be extended at our option until June 2012. At December 31, 2008, there was $111 million available on the unsecured line of credit.
          We also maintain a $80 million term note maturing September 2013 bearing interest at a fixed rate of 6.26%, a $20 million term note maturing September 2013 bearing interest at a variable rate equal to LIBOR plus 1.50%, and a $150 million unsecured term note maturing in April 2016 bearing interest at 6.38%.
          In April 2006, the Company entered into a $150 million unsecured term note maturing in April 2016 bearing interest at 6.38%. The proceeds from this term note were used to pay down the outstanding balance on the Company’s line of credit, to repay a $25 million term note entered in January 2006 and a $15 million term note entered in April 2006, and to make an additional investment into Locke Sovran I, LLC and Locke Sovran II, LLC (consolidated joint ventures). In December 2006, we issued 2.3 million shares of our common stock and realized net proceeds of $122.4 million. A portion of the proceeds were used to repay the entire outstanding balance on our line of credit that had been drawn on to finance acquisitions subsequent to April 2006. The remaining proceeds from the 2006 common stock offering were used along with 2007 borrowings under our line of credit to fund 2007 acquisitions.
          The line of credit facility and term notes currently have investment grade ratings from Standard and Poor’s (BBB-) and Fitch (BBB-).
          Our line of credit and term notes require us to meet certain financial covenants, including prescribed leverage, fixed charge coverage, minimum net worth, limitations on additional indebtedness and limitations on dividend payouts. As of December 31, 2008, we were in compliance with all covenants.
          In addition to the unsecured financing mentioned above, our consolidated financial statements also include $109.3 million of mortgages payable as detailed below:
* 7.80% mortgage note due December 2011, secured by 11 self-storage facilities (Locke Sovran I) with an aggregate net book value of $43.8 million, principal and interest paid monthly. The outstanding balance at December 31, 2008 on this mortgage was $29.0 million.
* 7.19% mortgage note due March 2012, secured by 27 self-storage facilities (Locke Sovran II) with an aggregate net book value of $81.2 million, principal and interest paid monthly. The outstanding balance at December 31, 2008 on this mortgage was $42.6 million.
* 7.25% mortgage note due December 2011, secured by 1 self-storage facility with an aggregate net book value of $5.8 million, principal and interest paid monthly. Estimated market rate at time of acquisition 5.40%. The outstanding balance at December 31, 2008 on this mortgage was $3.5 million.
* 6.76% mortgage note due September 2013, secured by 1 self-storage facility with an aggregate net book value of $2.0 million, principal and interest paid monthly. The outstanding balance at December 31, 2008 on this mortgage was $1.0 million.
* 6.35% mortgage note due March 2014, secured by 1 self-storage facility with an aggregate net book value of $3.8 million, principal and interest paid monthly. The outstanding balance at December 31, 2008 on this mortgage was $1.1 million.
* 5.55% mortgage notes due November 2009, secured by 8 self-storage facilities with an aggregate net book value of $34.9 million, interest only paid monthly. Estimated market rate at time of acquisition 6.44%. The outstanding balance at December 31, 2008 on this mortgage was $25.9 million.
* 7.50% mortgage notes due August 2011, secured by 3 self-storage facilities with an aggregate net book value of $14.3 million, principal and interest paid monthly. Estimated market rate at time of acquisition 6.42%. The outstanding balance at December 31, 2008 on this mortgage was $6.1 million.

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          The 7.80% and 7.19% mortgages were incurred in 2001 and 2002 respectively as part of the financing of the consolidated joint ventures. The Company assumed the 7.25%, 6.76%, 6.35%, 5.55% and 7.50% mortgage notes in connection with the acquisitions of storage facilities in 2005 and 2006.
          On July 7, 2007, we issued 920,244 shares of our common stock to the holder of our 8.375% Series C Preferred Stock upon the holder’s election to convert the remaining 1,200,000 shares of Series C Preferred Stock into common stock. As a result of the 2007 conversion, $26.6 million recorded in shareholders’ equity as 8.375% Series C Convertible Cumulative Preferred Stock was reclassified to additional paid-in capital in July 2007.
          During 2008, we issued approximately 285,000 shares via our Dividend Reinvestment and Stock Purchase Plan and Employee Stock Option Plan. We received $10.7 million from the sale of such shares. We expect to issue shares when our share price and capital needs warrant such issuance.
          During 2008 and 2007, we did not acquire any shares of our common stock via the Share Repurchase Program authorized by the Board of Directors. From the inception of the Share Repurchase Program through December 31, 2008, we have reacquired a total of 1,171,886 shares pursuant to this program. From time to time, subject to market price and certain loan covenants, we may reacquire additional shares.
          Future acquisitions, our expansion and enhancement program, and share repurchases are expected to be funded with draws on our line of credit, sale of properties and private placement solicitation of joint venture equity. Current capital market conditions may prevent us from accessing other traditional sources of capital including the issuance of common and preferred stock and the issuance of unsecured term notes. Should these capital market conditions persist, we may have to curtail acquisitions, our expansion and enhancement program, and share repurchases as we approach June 2011, when our line of credit matures.
CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS
          The following table summarizes our future contractual obligations:
                                         
Contractual   Payments due by period
obligations   Total   2009   2010-2011   2012-2013   2014 and thereafter
Line of credit
  $14.0 million         $14.0 million            
Term notes
  $500.0 million               $350.0 million   $150.0 million
Mortgages payable
  $109.3 million   $28.0 million   $40.3 million   $40.0 million   $1.0 million
Interest payments
  $136.2 million   $28.8 million   $53.3 million   $32.6 million   $21.5 million
Land lease
  $1.1 million   $0.1 million   $0.1 million   $0.1 million   $0.8 million
Building leases
  $3.9 million   $0.6 million   $0.3 million   $0.1 million   $2.9 million
 
                     
Total
  $764.5 million   $57.5 million   $108.0 million   $422.8 million   $176.2 million
          Interest payments includes actual interest on fixed rate debt and estimated interest for floating-rate debt based on December 31, 2008 rates.
ACQUISITION OF PROPERTIES
          During 2008, we used operating cash flow, borrowings pursuant to the line of credit, borrowings under the bank term note, and proceeds from our Dividend Reinvestment and Stock Purchase Plan to acquire three Properties in Mississippi and Ohio comprising 0.2 million square feet from unaffiliated storage operators. During 2007, we used operating cash flow, borrowings pursuant to the line of credit, borrowings under the bank term note, proceeds from our Dividend Reinvestment and Stock Purchase Plan, and proceeds from the December 2006 common stock offering to acquire 31 Properties in Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, New York, and Texas comprising 2.3 million square feet from unaffiliated storage operators. During 2006, we used operating cash flow, borrowings pursuant to the line of credit, borrowings under the $150 million 10 year term note, and proceeds from our Dividend Reinvestment and Stock Purchase Plan to acquire 42 Properties in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Louisiana, Missouri,

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New Hampshire, New York, Tennessee, and Texas comprising 2.6 million square feet from unaffiliated storage operators.
FUTURE ACQUISITION AND DEVELOPMENT PLANS
          Our external growth strategy is to increase the number of facilities we own by acquiring suitable facilities in markets in which we already have operations, or to expand in new markets by acquiring several facilities at once in those new markets. In conjunction with the joint venture agreement entered in May 2008 (see Note 13 to the financial statements), potential acquisition opportunities over the first nine months of the agreement will be offered to the joint venture. The Company’s acquisitions over this period will therefore be limited to facilities that do not fit the joint venture’s investment objectives, but do meet ours. In 2008, the Company’s joint venture (Sovran HHF Storage Holdings LLC) acquired 25 properties for approximately $171.5 million. The Company’s equity contribution to the joint venture for these purchases was approximately $18.6 million, which was financed through draws on our line of credit.
          In 2008 we continued our program of expanding and enhancing our existing properties. During 2008 we spent approximately $25.6 million on such revenue enhancing improvements. In 2009 we expect to curtail our expansion of current properties with total new expenditures less than $15 million on projects started in 2008. Funding of the expansions are expected to be provided primarily from borrowings under our line of credit and issuance of common shares through our Dividend Reinvestment and Stock Purchase Plan.
DISPOSITION OF PROPERTIES
          During 2008, we sold one non-strategic storage facility located in Michigan for net cash proceeds of $7.0 million resulting in a gain of $0.7 million. In 2004, as part of an asset management program, we sold five non-strategic storage facilities located in Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Ohio, and South Carolina to unaffiliated parties for $11.7 million resulting in a net gain of $1.1 million. No sales took place in 2005 through 2007.
          We may seek to sell additional Properties to joint venture programs or third parties in 2009.
OFF-BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS
          The Company has a 20% ownership interest in Sovran HHF Storage Holdings LLC (“Sovran HHF”), a joint venture that was formed in May 2008 to acquire self-storage properties that will be managed by the Company. The carrying value of the Company’s investment at December 31, 2008 was $20.1 million. Twenty five properties were acquired by Sovran HHF as of December 31, 2008 for approximately $171.5 million. The Company contributed $18.6 million to the joint venture as its share of capital required to fund the acquisitions.
          As manager of Sovran HHF, the Company earns a management and call center fee of 7% of gross revenues which totaled $0.5 million for 2008. The Company also received an acquisition fee of 0.5% of purchase price for securing purchases for the joint venture. During 2008, the Company recorded $0.6 million in acquisition fees. The Company’s share of Sovran HHF’s income for 2008 was $0.1 million. At December 31, 2008, Sovran HHF owed the Company $0.3 million for payments made by the Company on behalf of the joint venture for normal operating expenses of the joint venture.
          The Company also has a 49% ownership interest in Iskalo Office Holdings, LLC, which owns the building that houses the Company’s headquarters and other tenants. The Company’s investment includes a capital contribution of $49. The carrying value of the Company’s investment is a liability of $0.5 million at December 31, 2008 and $0.4 million at December 31, 2007, and is included in accounts payable and accrued liabilities in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets. For the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006, the Company’s share of Iskalo Office Holdings, LLC’s (loss) income was ($6,000), $80,000, and $80,000, respectively. The Company paid rent to Iskalo Office Holdings, LLC of $600,000, $561,000 and $583,000 in 2008, 2007, and 2006, respectively. Future minimum lease payments under the lease are $0.6 million per year through 2010.
          In April 2006, the Company made an additional investment of $2.8 million in a former off-balance sheet arrangement known as Locke Sovran I, LLC that increased the Company’s ownership to over 70%. As a result of

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this transaction the Company has consolidated the results of operations of Locke Sovran I, LLC in its financial statements since April 1, 2006, the date that it acquired its controlling interest. In June 2008, the Company made an additional investment of $6.1 million in Locke Sovran I, LLC that increased the Company’s ownership from approximately 70% to 100%. Locke Sovran I, LLC, owns 11 self-storage facilities throughout the United States.
          A summary of the unconsolidated joint venture’s financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2008 is as follows:
                 
    Sovran HHF        
    Storage     Iskalo Office  
(dollars in thousands)   Holdings LLC     Holdings, LLC  
Balance Sheet Data:
               
Investment in storage facilities, net
  $ 170,176     $  
Investment in office building
          5,507  
Other assets
    3,912       568  
 
           
Total Assets
  $ 174,088     $ 6,075  
 
           
 
               
Due to the Company
  $ 336     $  
Mortgages payable
    79,937       7,169  
Other liabilities
    1,942       168  
 
           
Total Liabilities
    82,215       7,337  
 
               
Unaffiliated partners’ equity (deficiency)
    73,499       (718 )
Company equity (deficiency)
    18,374       (544 )
 
           
Total Liabilities and Partners’ Equity (deficiency)
  $ 174,088     $ 6,075  
 
           
 
               
Income Statement Data:
               
Total revenues
  $ 6,652     $ 1,127  
Total expenses
    6,301       1,139  
 
           
Net income (loss)
  $ 351     $ (12 )
 
           
          We do not expect to have material future cash outlays relating to these joint ventures outside our share of capital for future acquisitions of properties by Sovran HHF. We do not guarantee the debt of Sovran HHF or Iskalo Office Holdings, LLC. A summary of our cash flows arising from the off-balance sheet arrangements with Sovran HHF and Iskalo Office Holdings, LLC for the three years ended December 31, 2008, and with Locke Sovran I, LLC for the three months ended March 31, 2006 (the date prior to which it began to be included in our consolidated results of operations) are as follows:
                         
    Year ended December 31,
(dollars in thousands)   2008   2007   2006
Statement of Operations
                       
Other income (management fees and acquisition fee income)
  $ 1,135     $     $ 85  
General and administrative expenses (corporate office rent)
    600       561       583  
Equity in income of joint ventures
    104       119       172  
Distributions from unconsolidated joint ventures
    345       98       123  
 
                       
Investing activities
                       
Investment in joint ventures
    (20,287 )            
(Advances to) reimbursement of advances to joint ventures
    (336 )           17  

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REIT QUALIFICATION AND DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS
          As a REIT, we are not required to pay federal income tax on income that we distribute to our shareholders, provided that the amount distributed is equal to at least 90% of our taxable income. These distributions must be made in the year to which they relate, or in the following year if declared before we file our federal income tax return, and if it is paid before the first regular dividend of the following year. The first distribution of 2008 may be applied toward our 2007 distribution requirement.
          As a REIT, we must derive at least 95% of our total gross income from income related to real property, interest and dividends. In 2008, our percentage of revenue from such sources was approximately 98%, thereby passing the 95% test, and no special measures are expected to be required to enable us to maintain our REIT designation. Although we currently intend to operate in a manner designed to qualify as a REIT, it is possible that future economic, market, legal, tax or other considerations may cause our Board of Directors to revoke our REIT election.
INTEREST RATE RISK
          We have entered into interest rate swap agreements in order to mitigate the effects of fluctuations in interest rates on our variable rate debt. At December 31, 2008, we have seven outstanding interest rate swap agreements as summarized below:
                                 
                    Fixed   Floating Rate
Notional Amount   Effective Date   Expiration Date   Rate Paid   Received
$50 Million
    11/14/05       9/1/09       4.3900 %   1 month LIBOR
$20 Million
    9/4/05       9/4/13       4.4350 %   6 month LIBOR
$50 Million
    10/10/06       9/1/09       4.4800 %   1 month LIBOR
$50 Million
    7/1/08       6/25/12       4.2825 %   1 month LIBOR
$100 Million
    7/1/08       6/22/12       4.2965 %   1 month LIBOR
$75 Million
    9/1/09       6/22/12       4.7100 %   1 month LIBOR
$25 Million
    9/1/09       6/22/12       4.2875 %   1 month LIBOR
          Upon renewal or replacement of the credit facility, our total interest may change dependent on the terms we negotiate with the lenders; however, the LIBOR base rates have been contractually fixed on $270 million of our debt through the interest rate swap termination dates.
          Through June 2012, $500 million of our $514 million of unsecured debt is on a fixed rate basis after taking into account the interest rate swaps noted above. Based on our outstanding unsecured debt of $514 million at December 31, 2008, a 100 basis point increase in interest rates would increase our interest expense $0.1 million annually.
          The table below summarizes our debt obligations and interest rate derivatives at December 31, 2008. The estimated fair value of financial instruments is subjective in nature and is dependent on a number of important assumptions, including discount rates and relevant comparable market information associated with each financial instrument. The use of different market assumptions and estimation methodologies may have a material effect on the reported estimated fair value amounts. Accordingly, the estimates presented below are not necessarily indicative of the amounts we would realize in a current market exchange.

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    Expected Maturity Date Including Discount           Fair
(dollars in thousands)   2009   2010   2011   2012   2013   Thereafter   Total   Value
Line of credit — variable rate LIBOR + 1.375
              $ 14,000                       $ 14,000     $ 14,000  
Notes Payable:
                                                               
Term note — variable rate LIBOR+1.625%
                    $ 250,000                 $ 250,000     $ 250,000  
Term note — variable rate LIBOR+1.50%
                          $ 20,000           $ 20,000     $ 20,000  
Term note — fixed rate 6.26%
                          $ 80,000           $ 80,000     $ 78,865  
Term note — fixed rate 6.38%
                                $ 150,000     $ 150,000     $ 147,899  
Mortgage note — fixed rate 7.80%
  $ 587     $ 630     $ 27,816                       $ 29,033     $ 30,031  
Mortgage note — fixed rate 7.19%
  $ 1,128     $ 1,211     $ 1,301     $ 38,963                 $ 42,603     $ 44,205  
Mortgage note — fixed rate 7.25%
  $ 141     $ 149     $ 3,220                       $ 3,510     $ 3,478  
Mortgage note — fixed rate 6.76%
  $ 23     $ 25     $ 27     $ 29     $ 896           $ 1,000     $ 1,018  
Mortgage note — fixed rate 6.35%
  $ 26     $ 28     $ 30     $ 31     $ 34     $ 949     $ 1,098     $ 1,100  
Mortgage notes — fixed rate 5.55%
  $ 25,930                                   $ 25,930     $ 26,422  
Mortgage notes — fixed rate 7.50%
  $ 208     $ 222     $ 5,657                       $ 6,087     $ 6,188  
Interest rate derivatives — liability
                                            $ 25,490  
INFLATION
          We do not believe that inflation has had or will have a direct effect on our operations. Substantially all of the leases at the facilities are on a month-to-month basis which provides us with the opportunity to increase rental rates as each lease matures.
SEASONALITY
          Our revenues typically have been higher in the third and fourth quarters, primarily because we increase rental rates on most of our storage units at the beginning of May and because self-storage facilities tend to experience greater occupancy during the late spring, summer and early fall months due to the greater incidence of residential moves during these periods. However, we believe that our customer mix, diverse geographic locations, rental structure and expense structure provide adequate protection against undue fluctuations in cash flows and net revenues during off-peak seasons. Thus, we do not expect seasonality to affect materially distributions to shareholders.
RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS
          In September 2006, FASB Statement 157, “Fair Value Measurements” (“SFAS 157”) was issued. SFAS 157 establishes a framework for measuring fair value by providing a standard definition of fair value as it applies to assets and liabilities. SFAS 157, which does not require any new fair value measurements, clarifies the application of other accounting pronouncements that require or permit fair value measurements. The effective date for the Company is January 1, 2008 for all financial instruments — see Note 10 to our Consolidated Financial Statements. However, the FASB has delayed the effective date of Statement 157 for all nonfinancial assets and nonfinancial liabilities until fiscal years beginning after November 15, 2008. The Company is evaluating the impact of adopting SFAS 157 on its consolidated financial statements for nonfinancial assets and nonfinancial liabilities.
          In February 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 159, “The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities” (“SFAS 159”). SFAS 159 allows entities to voluntarily choose, at specified election dates, to measure many financial assets and liabilities at fair value. The effective date for the Company is January 1, 2008. The adoption of SFAS 159 did not impact the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

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Table of Contents

          In December 2007, FASB issued SFAS No. 160, “Noncontrolling Interests in Consolidated Financial Statements” (SFAS No. 160), which amends Accounting Research Bulletin No. 51, “Consolidated Financial Statements”, to improve the relevance, comparability, and transparency of the financial information that a reporting entity provides in its consolidated financial statements. SFAS No. 160 establishes accounting and reporting standards that require the ownership interests in subsidiaries not held by the parent to be clearly identified, labeled and presented in the consolidated statement of financial position within equity, but separate from the parent’s equity. This statement also requires the amount of consolidated net income attributable to the parent and to the non-controlling interest to be clearly identified and presented on the face of the consolidated statement of income. This Statement applies prospectively to all entities that prepare consolidated financial statements and applies prospectively for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning January 1, 2009 for the Company. The Company is evaluating the impact of SFAS 160 on its consolidated financial statements.
          In December 2007, the FASB Statement 141R, “Business Combinations” (“SFAS 141R”) was issued. SFAS 141R replaces SFAS 141. SFAS 141R requires the acquirer of a business to recognize and measure the identifiable assets acquired, the liabilities assumed, and any non-controlling interest in the acquiree at fair value. SFAS 141R also requires transactions costs related to the business combination to be expensed as incurred. SFAS 141R applies prospectively to business combinations for which the acquisition date is on or after the beginning of the first annual reporting period beginning on or after December 15, 2008. The effective date for the Company will be January 1, 2009. We have not yet determined the impact of SFAS 141R related to future acquisitions, if any, on our consolidated financial statements.
          In March 2008, the FASB issued SFAS No. 161, “Disclosures About Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities — an amendment of FASB Statement No. 133” (“SFAS No. 161”). SFAS No. 161 expands quarterly disclosure requirements in SFAS No. 133 about an entity’s derivative instruments and hedging activities. SFAS No. 161 is effective for the Company as of January 1, 2009. The Company is currently assessing the impact of SFAS No. 161 on our consolidated financial statements.
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
          The information required is incorporated by reference to the information appearing under the caption “Interest Rate Risk” in Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” above.

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Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
The Board of Directors and Shareholders of Sovran Self Storage, Inc.
          We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Sovran Self Storage, Inc. as of December 31, 2008 and 2007, and the related consolidated statements of operations, shareholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2008. Our audits also included the financial statement schedule listed in the Index at Item 15(a). These financial statements and schedule are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements and schedule based on our audits.
          We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
          In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Sovran Self Storage, Inc. at December 31, 2008 and 2007, and the consolidated results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2008, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Also, in our opinion, the related financial statement schedule, when considered in relation to the basic financial statements taken as a whole, presents fairly in all material respects the information set forth therein.
          We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), Sovran Self Storage, Inc.’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2008, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission and our report dated February 25, 2009 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.
/s/ Ernst & Young LLP
Buffalo, New York
February 25, 2009

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SOVRAN SELF STORAGE, INC.
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
                 
    December 31,  
(dollars in thousands, except share data)   2008     2007  
Assets
               
Investment in storage facilities:
               
Land
  $ 240,525     $ 236,349  
Building, equipment, and construction in progress
    1,148,676       1,086,359  
 
           
 
    1,389,201       1,322,708  
Less: accumulated depreciation
    (216,644 )     (183,679 )
 
           
Investment in storage facilities, net
    1,172,557       1,139,029  
Cash and cash equivalents
    4,486       4,010  
Accounts receivable
    2,971       2,794  
Receivable from related parties
    14       27  
Receivable from unconsolidated joint venture
    336        
Investment in unconsolidated joint venture
    20,111        
Prepaid expenses
    4,691       4,771  
Other assets
    7,460       7,574  
Net assets of discontinued operations
          6,383  
 
           
Total Assets
  $ 1,212,626     $ 1,164,588  
 
           
 
               
Liabilities
               
Line of credit
  $ 14,000     $ 100,000  
Term notes
    500,000       356,000  
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
    23,979       23,752  
Deferred revenue
    5,659       5,602  
Fair value of interest rate swap agreements
    25,490       1,230  
Accrued dividends
    14,090       13,656  
Mortgages payable
    109,261       110,517  
 
           
Total Liabilities
    692,479       610,757  
 
               
Minority interest — Operating Partnership
    9,265       9,659  
Minority interest — consolidated joint venture
    13,082       16,783  
 
               
Shareholders’ Equity
               
Common stock $.01 par value, 100,000,000 shares authorized, 22,016,348 shares outstanding (21,676,586 at December 31, 2007)
    232       228  
Additional paid-in capital
    666,633       654,141  
Dividends in excess of net income
    (116,728 )     (98,437 )
Accumulated other comprehensive income
    (25,162 )     (1,368 )
Treasury stock at cost, 1,171,886 shares
    (27,175 )     (27,175 )
 
           
Total Shareholders’ Equity
    497,800       527,389  
 
           
Total Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity
  $ 1,212,626     $ 1,164,588  
 
           
See notes to financial statements.

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SOVRAN SELF STORAGE, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
                         
    Year Ended December 31,  
(dollars in thousands, except per share data)   2008     2007     2006  
Revenues
                       
Rental income
  $ 195,220     $ 186,581     $ 160,011  
Other operating income
    7,783       6,276       5,358  
 
                 
Total operating revenues
    203,003       192,857       165,369  
 
                       
Expenses
                       
Property operations and maintenance
    55,739       52,317       43,833  
Real estate taxes
    19,004       17,370       15,166  
General and administrative
    17,279       15,234       14,095  
Depreciation and amortization
    34,421       33,851       25,163  
 
                 
Total operating expenses
    126,443       118,772       98,257  
 
                 
 
                       
Income from operations
    76,560       74,085       67,112  
 
                       
Other income (expenses)
                       
Interest expense
    (38,097 )     (33,861 )     (29,494 )
Interest income
    322       954       807  
Casualty gain
          114        
Minority interest — Operating Partnership
    (721 )     (783 )     (905 )
Minority interest — consolidated joint ventures
    (1,563 )     (1,848 )     (1,529 )
Equity in income of joint ventures
    104       119       172  
 
                 
 
Income from continuing operations
    36,605       38,780       36,163  
Income from discontinued operations (including gain on disposal of $716 in 2008)
    794       434       447  
 
                 
Net income
    37,399       39,214       36,610  
Preferred stock dividends
          (1,256 )     (2,512 )
 
                 
Net income available to common shareholders
  $ 37,399     $ 37,958     $ 34,098  
 
                 
 
                       
Earnings per common share — basic
                       
Continuing operations
  $ 1.68     $ 1.79     $ 1.87  
Discontinued operations
    0.04       0.02       0.03  
 
                 
Earning per share — basic
  $ 1.72     $ 1.81     $ 1.90  
 
                 
 
                       
Earnings per common share — diluted
                       
Continuing operations
  $ 1.68     $ 1.79     $ 1.86  
Discontinued operations
    0.04       0.02       0.03  
 
                 
Earning per share — diluted
  $ 1.72     $ 1.81     $ 1.89  
 
                 
 
                       
Dividends declared per common share
  $ 2.54     $ 2.50     $ 2.47  
See notes to financial statements.

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SOVRAN SELF STORAGE, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
                                 
    8.375% Series                    
    C Preferred     8.375% Series C     Common        
    Stock     Preferred     Stock     Common  
(dollars in thousands, except share data)   Shares     Stock     Shares     Stock  
Balance January 1, 2006
    1,200,000     $ 26,613       17,563,046     $ 187  
Net proceeds from the issuance of common stock
                2,300,000       23  
Net proceeds from issuance of stock through Dividend Reinvestment and Stock Purchase Plan
                501,089       5  
Exercise of stock options
                37,675        
Reclass of unearned non-vested stock to additional paid in capital
                       
Issuance of non-vested stock
                41,719       1  
Earned portion of non-vested stock
                       
Stock option expense
                       
Deferred compensation outside directors
                       
Carrying value less than redemption value on redeemed partnership units
                       
Net income
                       
Change in fair value of derivatives
                       
Total comprehensive income
                       
Dividends
                       
 
                       
Balance December 31, 2006
    1,200,000       26,613       20,443,529       216  
Net proceeds from issuance of stock through Dividend Reinvestment and Stock Purchase Plan
                252,816       3  
Exercise of stock options
                13,100        
Issuance of non-vested stock
                43,989        
Earned portion of non-vested stock
                       
Stock option expense
                       
Deferred compensation outside directors
                       
Conversion of Series C Preferred Stock to common stock and exercise of related stock warrants
    (1,200,000 )     (26,613 )     920,244       9  
Conversion of operating partnership units to common stock
                2,908        
Carrying value less than redemption value on redeemed partnership units
                       
Net income
                       
Change in fair value of derivatives
                       
Total comprehensive income
                       
Dividends
                       
 
                       
Balance December 31, 2007
                21,676,586       228  
Net proceeds from issuance of stock through Dividend Reinvestment and Stock Purchase Plan
                285,308       3  
Exercise of stock options
                2,600        
Issuance of non-vested stock
                45,713       1  
Earned portion of non-vested stock
                       
Stock option expense
                       
Deferred compensation outside directors
                6,141        
Carrying value less than redemption value on redeemed partnership units
                       
Net income
                       
Change in fair value of derivatives
                       
Total comprehensive income
                       
Dividends
                       
 
                       
Balance December 31, 2008
        $       22,016,348     $ 232  
 
                       
See notes to financial statements

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SOVRAN SELF STORAGE, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
                                                 
    Additional             Dividends in     Accumulated              
    Paid-in     Non-vested     Excess of     Other Comprehensive     Treasury     Total  
    Capital     Stock     Net Income     Income (loss)     Stock     Equity  
 
  $ 466,839     $ (1,838 )   $ (71,995 )   $ 1,454     $ (27,175 )   $ 394,085  
 
    122,388                               122,411  
 
   
24,862
                              24,867  
 
    1,142                               1,142  
 
    (1,838 )     1,838                          
 
    (1 )                              
 
    876                               876  
 
    119                               119  
 
    181                               181  
 
    (1,830 )                             (1,830 )
 
                36,610                   36,610  
 
                      674             674  
 
                                             
 
                                  37,284  
 
                (48,224 )                 (48,224 )
 
                                   
 
    612,738             (83,609 )     2,128       (27,175 )     530,911  
 
   
12,756
                              12,759  
 
    425                               425  
 
                                   
 
    1,224                               1,224  
 
    183                               183  
 
    161                               161  
 
   
26,604
                               
 
    167                               167  
 
    (117 )                             (117 )
 
                39,214                   39,214  
 
                      (3,496 )           (3,496 )
 
                                             
 
                                  35,718  
 
                (54,042 )                 (54,042 )
 
                                   
 
    654,141             (98,437 )     (1,368 )     (27,175 )     527,389  
 
   
10,654
                              10,657  
 
    72                               72  
 
                                  1  
 
    1,444                               1,444  
 
    279                               279  
 
    112                               112  
 
    (69 )                             (69 )
 
                37,399                   37,399  
 
                      (23,794 )           (23,794 )
 
                                             
 
                                  13,605  
 
                (55,690 )                 (55,690 )
 
                                   
 
  $ 666,633     $     $ (116,728 )   $ (25,162 )   $ (27,175 )   $ 497,800  
 
                                   

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SOVRAN SELF STORAGE, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
                         
    Year Ended December 31,  
(dollars in thousands)   2008     2007     2006  
Operating Activities
                       
Net income
  $ 37,399     $ 39,214     $ 36,610  
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
                       
Depreciation and amortization
    35,659       34,999       26,340  
Gain on sale
    (716 )            
Casualty gain
          (114 )      
Equity in income of joint ventures
    (104 )     (119 )     (172 )
Distributions from unconsolidated joint venture
    345       98       123  
Minority interest
    2,284       2,631       2,434  
Non-vested stock earned
    1,444       1,224       876  
Stock option expense
    279       183       119  
Changes in assets and liabilities:
                       
Accounts receivable
    (171 )     (599 )     (407 )
Prepaid expenses
    118       822       (2,029 )
Accounts payable and other liabilities
    619       7,082       1,011  
Deferred revenue
    (24 )     (246 )     (249 )
 
                 
Net cash provided by operating activities
    77,132       85,175       64,656  
 
                       
Investing Activities
                       
Acquisition of storage facilities
    (18,547 )     (138,059 )     (130,251 )
Improvements, equipment additions, and construction in progress
    (45,709 )     (52,441 )     (37,021 )
Net proceeds from the sale of storage facility
    7,002              
Casualty insurance proceeds received
          1,692        
Investment in unconsolidated joint venture
    (20,287 )            
Additional investment in consolidated joint ventures net of cash acquired
    (6,106 )           (8,181 )
(Advances to) reimbursement of advances to joint ventures
    (336 )           17  
Reimbursement of (payment of) property deposits
    1,259       (1,469 )     (1,169 )
Receipts from related parties
    13       10       38  
 
                 
Net cash used in investing activities
    (82,711 )     (190,267 )     (176,567 )
 
                       
Financing Activities
                       
Net proceeds from sale of common stock
    10,842       13,345       148,601  
Proceeds from line of credit
    14,000       112,000       94,000  
Repayment of line of credit and term note
    (206,000 )     (12,000 )     (184,000 )
Proceeds from term notes
    250,000       6,000       150,000  
Financing costs
    (3,085 )     (316 )     (632 )
Dividends paid — common stock
    (55,256 )     (51,805 )     (43,837 )
Dividends paid — preferred stock
          (1,256 )     (2,513 )
Minority interest distributions
    (2,633 )     (2,912 )     (2,815 )
Redemption of operating partnership units
    (114 )     (174 )     (2,788 )
Mortgage principal and capital lease payments
    (1,699 )     (1,510 )     (1,286 )
 
                 
Net cash provided by financing activities
    6,055       61,372       154,730  
 
                 
Net increase (decrease) in cash
    476       (43,720 )     42,819  
Cash at beginning of period
    4,010       47,730       4,911  
 
                 
Cash at end of period
  $ 4,486     $ 4,010     $ 47,730  
 
                 
 
                       
Supplemental cash flow information
                       
Cash paid for interest, net of interest capitalized
  $ 37,970     $ 32,313     $ 26,647  
 
                       
Fair value of net liabilities assumed on the acquisition of storage facilities
    107       1,580       65,650  
Dividends declared but unpaid at December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006 were $14,090, $13,656, and $12,675, respectively.
See notes to financial statements.

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SOVRAN SELF STORAGE, INC. — DECEMBER 31, 2008
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
1. ORGANIZATION
     Sovran Self Storage, Inc. (the “Company,” “We,” “Our,” or “Sovran”), a self-administered and self-managed real estate investment trust (a “REIT”), was formed on April 19, 1995 to own and operate self-storage facilities throughout the United States. On June 26, 1995, the Company commenced operations effective with the completion of its initial public offering. At December 31, 2008, we had an ownership interest in and managed 385 self-storage properties in 24 states under the name Uncle Bob’s Self Storage ®. Among our 385 self-storage properties are 27 properties that we manage for a consolidated joint venture of which we are a majority owner and 25 properties that we manage for an unconsolidated joint venture of which we are a 20% owner. Over 40% of the Company’s revenue is derived from stores in the states of Texas and Florida.
2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
     Basis of Presentation: All of the Company’s assets are owned by, and all its operations are conducted through, Sovran Acquisition Limited Partnership (the “Operating Partnership”). Sovran Holdings, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company (the “Subsidiary”), is the sole general partner of the Operating Partnership; the Company is a limited partner of the Operating Partnership, and through its ownership of the Subsidiary and its limited partnership interest controls the operations of the Operating Partnership, holding a 98.1% ownership interest therein as of December 31, 2008. The remaining ownership interests in the Operating Partnership (the “Units”) are held by certain former owners of assets acquired by the Operating Partnership subsequent to its formation.
     We consolidate all wholly owned subsidiaries. Partially owned subsidiaries and joint ventures are consolidated when we control the entity. Our consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company, the Operating Partnership, Locke Sovran I, LLC, and Locke Sovran II, LLC, which is a majority owned joint venture. All intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated. Investments in joint ventures that we do not control but for which we have significant influence over are reported using the equity method.
     In April 2006, the Company made additional investments of $8,475,000 in Locke Sovran I, LLC and Locke Sovran II, LLC that increased the Company’s ownership from approximately 45% to over 70% in each of these joint ventures. As a result of this transaction, from the date that its controlling interest was acquired, the Company has consolidated the accounts of Locke Sovran I, LLC in its financial statements. The accounts of Locke Sovran II, LLC were already being included in the Company’s financial statements as it has been a majority controlled joint venture since 2001. In June 2008, the Company made an additional investment of $6.1 million in Locke Sovran I, LLC that increased the Company’s ownership from approximately 70% to 100%.
     Cash and Cash Equivalents: The Company considers all highly liquid investments purchased with maturities of three months or less to be cash equivalents. The cash balance includes $3.8 million and $3.2 million, respectively, held in escrow for encumbered properties at December 31, 2008 and 2007.
     Revenue and Expense Recognition: Rental income is recognized when earned pursuant to month-to-month leases for storage space. Promotional discounts are recognized as a reduction to rental income over the promotional period, which is generally during the first month of occupancy. Rental income received prior to the start of the rental period is included in deferred revenue. Equity in earnings of real estate joint ventures that we have significant influence over is recognized based on our ownership interest in the earnings of these entities.
     Cost of operations, general and administrative expense, interest expense and advertising costs are expensed as incurred. For the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007, and 2006, advertising costs were $1.4 million, $1.4 million, and $1.0 million, respectively. The Company accrues property taxes based on estimates and historical trends. If these estimates are incorrect, the timing and amount of expense recognition would be affected.
     Other Income: Consists primarily of sales of storage-related merchandise (locks and packing supplies), insurance commissions, incidental truck rentals, and management fees from unconsolidated joint ventures.

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     Investment in Storage Facilities: Storage facilities are recorded at cost. The purchase price of acquired facilities is allocated to land, building, equipment, and in-place customer leases based on the fair value of each component. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over estimated useful lives of forty years for buildings and improvements, and five to twenty years for furniture, fixtures and equipment. Expenditures for significant renovations or improvements that extend the useful life of assets are capitalized. Interest and other costs incurred during the construction period of major expansions are capitalized. Capitalized interest during the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007 was $0.4 million. No interest was capitalized during 2006. Repair and maintenance costs are expensed as incurred.
     Whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the basis of the Company’s property may not be recoverable, the Company’s policy is to assess any impairment of value. Impairment is evaluated based upon comparing the sum of the expected undiscounted future cash flows to the carrying value of the property, on a property by property basis. If the sum of the undiscounted cash flow is less than the carrying amount, an impairment loss is recognized for the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds the fair value of the asset. At December 31, 2008 and 2007, no assets had been determined to be impaired under this policy and, accordingly, this policy had no impact on the Company’s financial position or results of operations.
     Other Assets: Included in other assets are net loan acquisition costs, a note receivable, property deposits, and the value placed on in-place customer leases at the time of acquisition. The loan acquisition costs were $6.8 million and $6.2 million at December 31, 2008, and 2007, respectively. Accumulated amortization on the loan acquisition costs was approximately $2.5 million and $3.8 million at December 31, 2008, and 2007, respectively. Loan acquisition costs are amortized over the terms of the related debt. The note receivable of $2.8 million represents a note from certain investors of Locke Sovran II, LLC. The note bears interest at LIBOR plus 2.4% and matures upon the dissolution of Locke Sovran II, LLC. Property deposits were $0.1 million and $1.5 million at December 31, 2008 and 2007, respectively.
     The Company allocates a portion of the purchase price of acquisitions to in-place customer leases. The value of in-place customer leases is based on the Company’s experience with customer turnover. The Company amortizes in-place customer leases on a straight-line basis over 12 months (the estimated future benefit period). At December 31, 2008, the gross carrying amount of in-place customer leases was $5.4 million and the accumulated amortization was $5.2 million
     Amortization expense, including amortization of in-place customer leases, was $1.3 million, $4.8 million and $1.0 million for the periods ended December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006, respectively.
     Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities: Accounts payable and accrued liabilities consists primarily of trade payables, accrued interest, and property tax accruals. The Company accrues property tax expense based on estimates and historical trends. Actual expense could differ from these estimates.
     Minority Interest: The minority interest reflects the outside ownership interest of the limited partners of the Operating Partnership and the joint venture partner’s interest in Locke Sovran II, LLC. Amounts allocated to these interests are reflected as an expense in the income statement and increase the minority interest in the balance sheet. Distributions to these partners reduce this balance. At December 31, 2008, Operating Partnership minority interest ownership was 419,952 Units, or 1.9% (at December 31, 2007 422,727 Units, or 1.9%). The redemption value of the Units at December 31, 2008 and 2007 was $15.1 million and $17.0 million, respectively. The Operating Partnership is obligated to redeem each Unit at the request of the holder thereof for cash equal to the fair market value of a share of the Company’s common stock, at the time of such redemption, provided that the Company at its option may elect to acquire any such Unit presented for redemption for one common share or cash.
     Income Taxes: The Company qualifies as a REIT under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, and will generally not be subject to corporate income taxes to the extent it distributes at least 90% of its taxable income to its shareholders and complies with certain other requirements. Accordingly, no provision has been made for federal income taxes in the accompanying financial statements. On an aggregate basis, the Company’s reported amounts of net assets exceeds the tax basis by approximately $74 million and $72 million at December 31, 2008 and 2007, respectively.

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     Comprehensive Income: Comprehensive income consists of net income and the change in value of derivatives used for hedging purposes and is reported in the consolidated statements of shareholders’ equity. Comprehensive income was $13.6 million, $35.7 million and $37.3 million for the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007, and 2006, respectively.
     Derivative Financial Instruments: The Company adopted SFAS No. 133, “Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities,” as amended, which requires companies to carry all derivatives on the balance sheet at fair value. The Company determines the fair value of derivatives by reference to quoted market prices. The accounting for changes in the fair value of a derivative instrument depends on whether it has been designated and qualifies as part of a hedging relationship and, if so, the reason for holding it. The Company’s use of derivative instruments is limited to cash flow hedges, as defined in SFAS No. 133, of certain interest rate risks.
     Recent Accounting Pronouncements: In February 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 159, “The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities” (“SFAS 159”). SFAS 159 allows entities to voluntarily choose, at specified election dates, to measure many financial assets and liabilities at fair value. The effective date for the Company is January 1, 2008. The adoption of SFAS 159 did not impact the Company’s consolidated financial statements.
     In December 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 160, “Noncontrolling Interests in Consolidated Financial Statements” (“SFAS No. 160”), which amends Accounting Research Bulletin No. 51, “Consolidated Financial Statements”, to improve the relevance, comparability, and transparency of the financial information that a reporting entity provides in its consolidated financial statements. SFAS No. 160 establishes accounting and reporting standards that require the ownership interests in subsidiaries not held by the parent to be clearly identified, labeled and presented in the consolidated statement of financial position within equity, but separate from the parent’s equity. This statement also requires the amount of consolidated net income attributable to the parent and to the non-controlling interest to be clearly identified and presented on the face of the consolidated statement of income. The effective date for the Company will be January 1, 2009. The Company has not yet determined the impact of SFAS 160 on our consolidated financial statements
     In December 2007, the FASB Statement 141R, “Business Combinations” (“SFAS 141R”) was issued. SFAS 141R replaces SFAS 141. SFAS 141R requires the acquirer of a business to recognize and measure the identifiable assets acquired, the liabilities assumed, and any non-controlling interest in the acquiree at fair value. SFAS 141R also requires transaction costs related to the business combination to be expensed as incurred. SFAS 141R applies prospectively to business combinations for which the acquisition date is on or after the beginning of the first annual reporting period beginning on or after December 15, 2008. The effective date for the Company will be January 1, 2009. The Company has not yet determined the impact of SFAS 141R related to future acquisitions, if any, on our consolidated financial statements.
     In March 2008, the FASB issued SFAS No. 161, “Disclosures About Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities — an amendment of FASB Statement No. 133” (“SFAS No. 161”). SFAS No. 161 expands quarterly disclosure requirements in SFAS No. 133 about an entity’s derivative instruments and hedging activities. The effective date for the Company will be January 1, 2009. The Company is currently assessing the impact of SFAS No. 161 on our consolidated financial statements.
     Stock-Based Compensation: Effective January 1, 2006, the Company adopted Statement 123(R) and uses the modified-prospective method. Under the modified-prospective method, the Company recognizes compensation cost in the financial statements issued subsequent to January 1, 2006 for all share based payments granted, modified, or settled after the date of adoption as well as for any awards that were granted prior to the adoption date for which the requisite service period has not been completed as of the adoption date.
     The Company recorded compensation expense (included in general and administrative expense) of $279,000, $183,000 and $119,000 related to stock options under Statement 123(R) and $1.4 million, $1.2 million and $876,000 related to amortization of non-vested stock grants for the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006, respectively. The Company uses the Black-Scholes Merton option pricing model to estimate the fair value of stock options granted subsequent to the adoption of FAS 123(R). The application of this pricing model involves assumptions that are judgmental and sensitive in the determination of compensation expense. The weighted average

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for key assumptions used in determining the fair value of options granted during 2008 follows:
                 
    Weighted Average   Range
Expected life (years)
    6.53       4.50 - 7.00  
Risk free interest rate
    3.78 %     2.65 - 3.94 %
Expected volatility
    22.61 %     22.40% - 24.30 %
Expected dividend yield
    6.1 %     6.00% - 7.00 %
Fair value
  $ 4.79     $ 3.21 - $5.10  
     To determine expected volatility, the Company uses historical volatility based on daily closing prices of its Common Stock over periods that correlate with the expected terms of the options granted. The risk-free rate is based on the United States Treasury yield curve at the time of grant for the expected life of the options granted. Expected dividends are based on the Company’s history and expectation of dividend payouts. The expected life of stock options is based on the midpoint between the vesting date and the end of the contractual term.
     Use of Estimates: The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. Actual results could differ from those estimates.
3. EARNINGS PER SHARE
     The Company reports earnings per share data in accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 128, “Earnings Per Share.” In computing earnings per share, the Company excludes preferred stock dividends from net income to arrive at net income available to common shareholders. The following table sets forth the computation of basic and diluted earnings per common share.
                         
(Amounts in thousands,   Year Ended December 31,  
except per share data)   2008     2007     2006  
Numerator:
                       
Net income from continuing operations available to common shareholders
  $ 36,605     $ 37,524     $ 33,651  
 
                       
Denominator:
                       
Denominator for basic earnings per share - weighted average shares
    21,762       20,955       17,951  
Effect of Dilutive Securities:
                       
Stock options and warrants and non-vested stock
    21       49       70  
 
                 
 
                       
Denominator for diluted earnings per share - adjusted weighted average shares and assumed conversion
    21,783       21,004       18,021  
 
                       
Basic Earnings per Common Share from continuing operations
  $ 1.68     $ 1.79     $ 1.87  
Basic Earnings per Common Share
  $ 1.72     $ 1.81     $ 1.90  
 
Diluted Earnings per Common Share from continuing operations
  $ 1.68     $ 1.79     $ 1.86  
Diluted Earnings per Common Share
  $ 1.72     $ 1.81     $ 1.89  

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4. INVESTMENT IN STORAGE FACILITIES
     The following summarizes activity in storage facilities during the years ended December 31, 2008 and December 31, 2007.
                 
(Dollars in thousands)   2008     2007  
Cost:
               
Beginning balance
  $ 1,322,708     $ 1,136,052  
Acquisition of storage facilities
    18,454       136,653  
Additional investment in consolidated joint ventures
    2,473        
Improvements and equipment additions
    44,998       45,806  
Increase in construction in progress
    761       6,621  
Dispositions
    (193 )     (2,424 )
 
           
Ending balance
  $ 1,389,201     $ 1,322,708  
 
               
Accumulated Depreciation:
               
Beginning balance
  $ 183,679     $ 154,449  
Additions during the year
    33,100       30,011  
Dispositions
    (135 )     (781 )
 
           
Ending balance
  $ 216,644     $ 183,679  
     The Company allocates purchase price to the tangible and intangible assets and liabilities acquired based on their estimated fair values. The value of land and buildings are determined at replacement cost. Intangible assets, which represent the value of existing customer leases, are recorded at their estimated fair values. During 2008, the Company acquired three storage facilities for $18.9 million. Substantially all of the purchase price of these facilities was allocated to land ($3.7 million), building ($14.7 million), equipment ($0.1 million) and in-place customer leases ($0.4 million) and the operating results of the acquired facilities have been included in the Company’s operations since the respective acquisition dates. During 2007, the Company acquired 31 storage facilities for $141.3 million. Substantially all of the purchase price of these facilities was allocated to land ($27.7 million), building ($110.0 million), equipment ($1.5 million) and in-place customer leases ($2.1 million) and the operating results of the acquired facilities have been included in the Company’s operations since the respective acquisition dates.
5. DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS
     In April 2008, the Company sold one non-strategic storage facility located in Michigan for net cash proceeds of $7.0 million resulting in a gain of $0.7 million. The operations of this facility and the gain on sale are reported as discontinued operations. The amounts in the 2007 and 2006 financial statements related to the operations and the net assets of this property have been reclassified and are presented as discontinued operations and net assets from discontinued operations, respectively. Cash flows of discontinued operations have not been segregated from the cash flows of continuing operations on the accompanying consolidated statement of cash flows for the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006. The following is a summary of the amounts reported as discontinued operations:
                         
    Year Ended December 31,  
(dollars in thousands)   2008     2007     2006  
Total revenue
  $ 233     $ 912     $ 927  
Property operations and maintenance expense
    (76 )     (196 )     (202 )
Real estate tax expense
    (33 )     (97 )     (94 )
Depreciation and amortization expense
    (46 )     (185 )     (184 )
Net realized gain on sale of property
    716              
 
                 
Total income from discontinued operations
  $ 794     $ 434     $ 447  
 
                 

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6. PRO FORMA FINANCIAL INFORMATION (UNAUDITED)
     The following unaudited pro forma Condensed Statement of Operations is presented as if (i) the 31 storage facilities purchased during 2007, (ii) the 42 storage facilities purchased during 2006, (iii) the additional investment in Locke Sovran I, LLC and Locke Sovran II, LLC in April 2006, and (iv) the related indebtedness incurred and assumed on these transactions had all occurred at January 1, 2006. Such unaudited pro forma information is based upon the historical statements of operations of the Company. It should be read in conjunction with the financial statements of the Company. In management’s opinion, all adjustments necessary to reflect the effects of these transactions have been made. This unaudited pro forma information does not purport to represent what the actual results of operations of the Company would have been assuming such transactions had been completed as set forth above nor does it purport to represent the results of operations for future periods.
                 
    Year Ended December 31,
(dollars in thousands, except share data)   2007   2006
Pro forma total operating revenues
  $ 199,569     $ 191,505  
 
               
Pro forma net income
  $ 41,749     $ 33,985  
 
               
Pro forma earnings per common share — diluted
  $ 1.92     $ 1.54  
7. UNSECURED LINE OF CREDIT AND TERM NOTES
     On June 25, 2008, the Company entered into agreements relating to new unsecured credit arrangements, and received funds under those arrangements. As part of the agreements, the Company entered into a $250 million unsecured term note maturing in June 2012 bearing interest at LIBOR plus 1.625%. The proceeds from this term note were used to repay the Company’s previous line of credit that was to mature in September 2008, the Company’s term note that was to mature in September 2009, the term note maturing in July 2008, and to provide for working capital. The new agreements also provide for a $125 million (expandable to $150 million) revolving line of credit maturing June 2011 bearing interest at a variable rate equal to LIBOR plus 1.375%, and requires a 0.25% facility fee. The interest rate at December 31, 2008 on the Company’s available line of credit was approximately 1.8% (5.5% at December 31, 2007). At December 31, 2008, there was $111 million available on the unsecured line of credit.
     The Company also maintains an $80 million term note maturing September 2013 bearing interest at a fixed rate of 6.26%, a $20 million term note maturing September 2013 bearing interest at a variable rate equal to LIBOR plus 1.50%, and a $150 million unsecured term note maturing in April 2016 bearing interest at 6.38%.
8. MORTGAGES PAYABLE AND OTHER DEBT DISCLOSURES
     Mortgages payable at December 31, 2008 and December 31, 2007 consist of the following:
                 
    December 31,     December 31,  
(dollars in thousands)   2008     2007  
7.80% mortgage note due December 2011, secured by 11 self-storage facilities (Locke Sovran I) with an aggregate net book value of $43.8 million, principal and interest paid monthly
  $ 29,033     $ 29,084  
7.19% mortgage note due March 2012, secured by 27 self-storage facilities (Locke Sovran II) with an aggregate net book value of $81.2 million, principal and interest paid monthly
    42,603       43,645  
7.25% mortgage note due December 2011, secured by 1 self-storage facility with an aggregate net book value of $5.8 million, principal and interest paid monthly. Estimated market rate at time of acquisition 5.40%
    3,510       3,643  
6.76% mortgage note due September 2013, secured by 1 self-storage facility with an aggregate net book value of $2.0 million, principal and interest paid monthly
    1,000       1,022  

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    December 31,     December 31,  
(dollars in thousands)   2008     2007  
6.35% mortgage note due March 2014, secured by 1 self-storage facility with an aggregate net book value of $3.8 million, principal and interest paid monthly
    1,098       1,122  
5.55% mortgage notes due November 2009, secured by 8 self-storage facilities with an aggregate net book value of $34.9 million, interest only paid monthly. Estimated market rate at time of acquisition 6.44%
    25,930       25,719  
7.50% mortgage notes due August 2011, secured by 3 self-storage facilities with an aggregate net book value of $14.3 million, principal and interest paid monthly. Estimated market rate at time of acquisition 6.42%
    6,087       6,282  
 
           
Total mortgages payable
  $ 109,261     $ 110,517  
 
           
     The Company assumed the 7.25%, 6.76%, 6.35%, 5.55% and 7.50% mortgage notes in connection with the acquisitions of storage facilities in 2005 and 2006. The 7.25%, 5.55%, and 7.50% mortgages were recorded at their estimated fair value based upon the estimated market rates at the time of the acquisitions ranging from 5.40% to 6.44%. The carrying value of these three mortgages approximates the actual principal balance of the mortgages payable. An immaterial premium exists at December 31, 2008, which will be amortized over the remaining term of the mortgages based on the effective interest method.
     The table below summarizes the Company’s debt obligations and interest rate derivatives at December 31, 2008. The estimated fair value of financial instruments is subjective in nature and is dependent on a number of important assumptions, including discount rates and relevant comparable market information associated with each financial instrument. The fair value of the fixed rate term note and mortgage note were estimated by discounting the future cash flows using the current rates at which similar loans would be made to borrowers with similar credit ratings and for the same remaining maturities. The use of different market assumptions and estimation methodologies may have a material effect on the reported estimated fair value amounts. Accordingly, the estimates presented below are not necessarily indicative of the amounts the Company would realize in a current market exchange.
                                                                 
    Expected Maturity Date Including Discount           Fair
(dollars in thousands)   2009   2010   2011   2012   2013   Thereafter   Total   Value
Line of credit — variable rate LIBOR + 1.375 (1.84% at December 31, 2008)
              $ 14,000                       $ 14,000     $ 14,000  
Notes Payable:
                                                               
Term note — variable rate LIBOR+1.625% (2.09% at December 31, 2008)
                    $ 250,000                 $ 250,000     $ 250,000  
Term note — variable rate LIBOR+1.50% (4.62% at December 31, 2008)
                          $ 20,000           $ 20,000     $ 20,000  
Term note — fixed rate 6.26%
                          $ 80,000           $ 80,000     $ 78,865  
Term note — fixed rate 6.38%
                                $ 150,000     $ 150,000     $ 147,899  
 
                                                               
Mortgage note — fixed rate 7.80%
  $ 587     $ 630     $ 27,816                       $ 29,033     $ 30,031  
Mortgage note — fixed rate 7.19%
  $ 1,128     $ 1,211     $ 1,301     $ 38,963                 $ 42,603     $ 44,205  
Mortgage note — fixed rate 7.25%
  $ 141     $ 149     $ 3,220                       $ 3,510     $ 3,478  
Mortgage note — fixed rate 6.76%
  $ 23     $ 25     $ 27     $ 29     $ 896           $ 1,000     $ 1,018  
Mortgage note — fixed rate 6.35%
  $ 26     $ 28     $ 30     $ 31     $ 34     $ 949     $ 1,098     $ 1,100  
Mortgage notes — fixed rate 5.55%
  $ 25,930                                   $ 25,930     $ 26,422  
Mortgage notes — fixed rate 7.50%
  $ 208     $ 222     $ 5,657                       $ 6,087     $ 6,188  
 
                                                               
Interest rate derivatives — liability
                                            $ 25,490  

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9. DERIVATIVE FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS
     Interest rate swaps are used to adjust the proportion of total debt that is subject to variable interest rates. The interest rate swaps require the Company to pay an amount equal to a specific fixed rate of interest times a notional principal amount and to receive in return an amount equal to a variable rate of interest times the same notional amount. The notional amounts are not exchanged. No other cash payments are made unless the contract is terminated prior to its maturity, in which case the contract would likely be settled for an amount equal to its fair value. The Company enters interest rate swaps with a number of major financial institutions to minimize counterparty credit risk.
     The interest rate swaps qualify and are designated as hedges of the amount of future cash flows related to interest payments on variable rate debt. Therefore, the interest rate swaps are recorded in the consolidated balance sheet at fair value and the related gains or losses are deferred in shareholders’ equity as Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (“AOCI”). These deferred gains and losses are amortized into interest expense during the period or periods in which the related interest payments affect earnings. However, to the extent that the interest rate swaps are not perfectly effective in offsetting the change in value of the interest payments being hedged, the ineffective portion of these contracts is recognized in earnings immediately. Ineffectiveness was immaterial in 2008, 2007, and 2006.
     The Company has entered into seven interest rate swap agreements as detailed below to effectively convert a total of $270 million of variable-rate debt to fixed-rate debt.
                                 
                    Fixed   Floating Rate
Notional Amount   Effective Date   Expiration Date   Rate Paid        Received
$50 Million
    11/14/05       9/1/09       4.3900 %   1 month LIBOR
$20 Million
    9/4/05       9/4/13       4.4350 %   6 month LIBOR
$50 Million
    10/10/06       9/1/09       4.4800 %   1 month LIBOR
$50 Million
    7/1/08       6/25/12       4.2825 %   1 month LIBOR
$100 Million
    7/1/08       6/22/12       4.2965 %   1 month LIBOR
$75 Million
    9/1/09       6/22/12       4.7100 %   1 month LIBOR
$25 Million
    9/1/09       6/22/12       4.2875 %   1 month LIBOR
     The interest rate swap agreements are the only derivative instruments, as defined by SFAS No. 133, held by the Company. During 2008, 2007, and 2006, the net reclassification from AOCI to interest expense was $2.6 million, ($1.1) million and ($0.5) million, respectively, based on payments (receipts) made or received under the swap agreements. Based on current interest rates, the Company estimates that payments under the interest rate swaps will be approximately $10.6 million in 2009. Receipts made under the interest rate swap agreements will be reclassified to interest expense as settlements occur. The fair value of the swap agreements, including accrued interest, was a liability of $25.5 million and $1.2 million at December 31, 2008, and 2007 respectively.
10. FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS
     In September 2006, the FASB issued SFAS No. 157, “Fair Value Measurements,” (SFAS 157. This statement defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value and expands the related disclosure requirements. This statement applies under other accounting pronouncements that require or permit fair value measurements. The statement indicates, among other things, that a fair value measurement assumes that the transaction to sell an asset or transfer a liability occurs in the principal market for the asset or liability or, in the absence of a principal market, the most advantageous market for the asset or liability. SFAS 157 defines fair value based upon an exit price model.
     Relative to SFAS 157, the FASB issued FASB Staff Positions (FSP) 157-1, 157-2, and 157-3. FSP 157-1 amends SFAS 157 to exclude SFAS No. 13, “Accounting for Leases,” (SFAS 13) and its related interpretive accounting pronouncements that address leasing transactions, while FSP 157-2 delays the effective date of the application of SFAS 157 to fiscal years beginning after November 15, 2008 for all nonfinancial assets and

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nonfinancial liabilities that are recognized or disclosed at fair value in the financial statements on a nonrecurring basis. FSP 157-3 addresses considerations in determining the fair value of a financial asset when the market for that asset is not active.
     We adopted SFAS 157 as of January 1, 2008, with the exception of the application of the statement to non-recurring nonfinancial assets and nonfinancial liabilities. Non-recurring nonfinancial assets and nonfinancial liabilities for which we have not applied the provisions of SFAS 157 include those measured at fair value in a business combination.
     SFAS 157 establishes a valuation hierarchy for disclosure of the inputs to valuation used to measure fair value. This hierarchy prioritizes the inputs into three broad levels as follows. Level 1 inputs are quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. Level 2 inputs are quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets or inputs that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly through market corroboration, for substantially the full term of the financial instrument. Level 3 inputs are unobservable inputs based on our own assumptions used to measure assets and liabilities at fair value. A financial asset or liability’s classification within the hierarchy is determined based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement.
     The following table provides the assets and liabilities carried at fair value measured on a recurring basis as of December 31, 2008 (in thousands):
                                 
    Asset            
    (Liability)   Level 1   Level 2   Level 3
Interest rate swaps
    (25,490 )           (25,490 )      
     Interest rate swaps are over the counter securities with no quoted readily available Level 1 inputs, and therefore are measured at fair value using inputs that are directly observable in active markets and are classified within Level 2 of the valuation hierarchy, using the income approach.
11. STOCK OPTIONS AND NON-VESTED STOCK
     The Company established the 2005 Award and Option Plan (the “Plan”) which replaced the expired 1995 Award and Option Plan for the purpose of attracting and retaining the Company’s executive officers and other key employees. 1,500,000 shares were authorized for issuance under the Plan. The options vest ratably over four and eight years, and must be exercised within ten years from the date of grant. The exercise price for qualified incentive stock options must be at least equal to the fair market value of the common shares at the date of grant. As of December 31, 2008, options for 324,688 shares were outstanding under the Plans and options for 1,096,464 shares of common stock were available for future issuance.
     The Company also established the 1995 Outside Directors’ Stock Option Plan (the Non-employee Plan) for the purpose of attracting and retaining the services of experienced and knowledgeable outside directors. The Non-employee Plan provides for the initial granting of options to purchase 3,500 shares of common stock and for the annual granting of options to purchase 2,000 shares of common stock to each eligible director. Such options vest over a one-year period for initial awards and immediately upon subsequent grants. In addition, effective in 2004 each outside director receives non-vested shares annually equal to 80% of the annual fees paid to them. During the restriction period, the non-vested shares may not be sold, transferred, or otherwise encumbered. The holder of the non-vested shares has all rights of a holder of common shares, including the right to vote and receive dividends. During 2008, 1,820 non-vested shares were issued to outside directors. Such non-vested shares vest over a one-year period. The total shares reserved under the Non-employee Plan is 150,000. The exercise price for options granted under the Non-employee Plan is equal to the fair market value at the date of grant. As of December 31, 2008, options for 36,000 common shares and non-vested shares of 9,160 were outstanding under the Non-employee Plan and options for no shares of common stock were available for future issuance.

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     A summary of the Company’s stock option activity and related information for the years ended December 31 follows:
                                                 
    2008     2007     2006  
            Weighted             Weighted             Weighted  
            average             average             average  
            exercise             exercise             exercise  
    Options     price     Options     price     Options     price  
Outstanding at beginning of year:
    168,125     $ 42.54       113,225     $ 35.77       142,900     $ 32.68  
 
                                               
Granted
    201,163       43.12       74,000       52.49       14,000       51.78  
Exercised
    (2,600 )     27.78       (13,100 )     32.44       (37,675 )     30.33  
Forfeited
    (6,000 )     36.86       (6,000 )     59.62       (6,000 )     33.05  
 
                                   
 
                                               
Outstanding at end of year
    360,688     $ 43.06       168,125     $ 42.54       113,225     $ 35.77  
 
                                               
Exercisable at end of year
    118,025     $ 38.84       82,625     $ 34.45       74,225     $ 31.14  
     A summary of the Company’s stock options outstanding at December 31, 2008 follows:
                                 
    Outstanding     Exercisable  
            Weighted             Weighted  
            average             average  
            exercise             exercise  
Exercise Price Range   Options     price     Options     price  
$20.375 – 29.99
    31,475     $ 21.58       31,475     $ 21.58  
$30.00 – 39.99
    33,050     $ 35.35       19,550     $ 34.11  
$40.00 – 57.79
    296,163     $ 46.21       67,000     $ 48.33  
 
                       
Total
    360,688     $ 43.06       118,025     $ 38.84  
         
Intrinsic value of outstanding stock options at December 31, 2008
  $ 506,184  
Intrinsic value of exercisable stock options at December 31, 2008
  $ 506,184  
Intrinsic value of stock options exercised in 2008
  $ 37,691  
     The aggregate intrinsic value is calculated as the difference between the exercise price of the underlying awards and the quoted price of the Company’s common stock at December 31, 2008, or the price on the date of exercise for those exercised during the year. As of December 31, 2008, there was approximately $1.1 million of total unrecognized compensation cost related to non-vested share-based compensation arrangements granted under our stock award plans. That cost is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of approximately 5.2 years. The weighted average remaining contractual life of all options is 8.0 years, and for exercisable options is 5.7 years.
Non-vested Stock
     The Company has also issued 289,587 shares of non-vested stock to employees which vest over two to nine year periods. During the restriction period, the non-vested shares may not be sold, transferred, or otherwise encumbered. The holder of the non-vested shares has all rights of a holder of common shares, including the right to vote and receive dividends. For the year ended December 31, 2008, the fair market value of the non-vested stock on the date of grant ranged from $20.38 to $59.81. During 2008, 43,893 shares of non-vested stock were issued to employees with an aggregate fair value of $1.8 million. The Company charges additional paid-in capital for the market value of shares as they are issued. The unearned portion is then amortized and charged to expense over the vesting period. The Company uses the average of the high and low price of its common stock on the date the award is granted as the fair value for non-vested stock awards.

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     A summary of the status of unvested shares of stock issued to employees and directors as of and during the years ended December 31 follows:
                                                 
    2008     2007     2006  
            Weighted             Weighted             Weighted  
    Non-     average     Non-     average     Non-     average  
    vested     grant date     vested     grant date     vested     grant date  
    Shares     fair value     Shares     fair value     Shares     fair value  
Unvested at beginning of year:
    115,896     $ 45.54       96,453     $ 40.21       71,411     $ 30.39  
Granted
    45,713       41.50       43,989       53.79       41,719       53.86  
Vested
    (30,802 )     42.71       (24,546 )     39.39       (16,677 )     32.29  
Forfeited
                                   
 
                                   
 
                                               
Unvested at end of year
    130,807     $ 44.79       115,896     $ 45.54       96,453     $ 40.21  
     Compensation expense of $1.4 million, $1.2 million and $0.9 million was recognized for the vested portion of non-vested stock grants in 2008, 2007 and 2006, respectively. The fair value of non-vested stock that vested during 2008, 2007 and 2006 was $1.3 million, $1.0 million and $0.5 million, respectively. The total unrecognized compensation cost related to non-vested stock was $4.8 million at December 31, 2008, and the remaining weighted-average period over which this expense will be recognized was 6 years.
12. RETIREMENT PLAN
     Employees of the Company qualifying under certain age and service requirements are eligible to be a participant in a 401(k) Plan. The Company contributes to the Plan at the rate of 50% of the first 4% of gross wages that the employee contributes. Total expense to the Company was approximately $284,000, $256,000, and $166,000 for the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006, respectively.
13. INVESTMENT IN JOINT VENTURES
     The Company has a 20% ownership interest in Sovran HHF Storage Holdings LLC (“Sovran HHF”), a joint venture that was formed in May 2008 to acquire self-storage properties that will be managed by the Company. The carrying value of the Company’s investment at December 31, 2008 was $20.1 million. Twenty five properties were acquired by Sovran HHF as of December 31, 2008 for approximately $171.5 million. The Company contributed $18.6 million to the joint venture as its share of capital required to fund the acquisitions. As of December 31, 2008, the carrying value of the Company’s investment in Sovran HHF exceeds its share of the underlying equity in net assets of Sovran HHF by approximately $1.7 million as a result of the capitalization of certain acquisition related costs. This difference is not amortized, it is included in the carrying value of the investment, which is assessed for impairment on a periodic basis.
     As manager of Sovran HHF, the Company earns a management and call center fee of 7% of gross revenues which totaled $0.5 million for 2008. The Company also received an acquisition fee of 0.5% of purchase price for securing purchases for the joint venture. During 2008, the Company recorded $0.7 million in acquisition fees. The Company’s share of Sovran HHF’s income for 2008 was $0.1 million. At December 31, 2008, Sovran HHF owed the Company $0.3 million for payments made by the Company on behalf of the joint venture.
     The Company also has a 49% ownership interest in Iskalo Office Holdings, LLC, which owns the building that houses the Company’s headquarters and other tenants. The Company’s investment includes a capital contribution of $49. The carrying value of the Company’s investment is a liability of $0.5 million at December 31, 2008 and $0.4 million at December 31, 2007, and is included in accounts payable and accrued liabilities in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets. For the years ended December 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006, the Company’s share of Iskalo Office Holdings, LLC’s (loss) income was ($6,000), $80,000, and $80,000, respectively. The

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Company paid rent to Iskalo Office Holdings, LLC of $600,000, $561,000 and $583,000 in 2008, 2007, and 2006, respectively. Future minimum lease payments under the lease are $0.6 million per year through 2010.
     A summary of the unconsolidated joint ventures’ financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2008 is as follows:
                 
    Sovran HHF        
    Storage     Iskalo Office  
(dollars in thousands)   Holdings LLC     Holdings, LLC  
Balance Sheet Data:
               
Investment in storage facilities, net
  $ 170,176     $  
Investment in office building
          5,507  
Other assets
    3,912       568  
 
           
Total Assets
  $ 174,088     $ 6,075  
 
           
 
               
Due to the Company
  $ 336     $  
Mortgages payable
    79,937       7,169  
Other liabilities
    1,942       168  
 
           
Total Liabilities
    82,215       7,337  
 
               
Unaffiliated partners’ equity (deficiency)
    73,499       (718 )
Company equity (deficiency)
    18,374       (544 )
 
           
Total Liabilities and Partners’ Equity (deficiency)
  $ 174,088     $ 6,075  
 
           
 
               
Income Statement Data:
               
Total revenues
  $ 6,652     $ 1,127  
Total expenses
    6,301       1,139  
 
           
Net income (loss)
  $ 351     $ (12 )
 
           
     The Company does not guarantee the debt of Sovran HHF or Iskalo Office Holdings, LLC.
14. PREFERRED STOCK
     On July 3, 2002, the Company entered into an agreement providing for the issuance of 2,800,000 shares of 8.375% Series C Convertible Cumulative Preferred Stock (“Series C Preferred”) in a privately negotiated transaction. The Company immediately issued 1,600,000 shares of the Series C Preferred and issued the remaining 1,200,000 shares on November 27, 2002. The offering price was $25.00 per share resulting in net proceeds for the Series C Preferred and related common stock warrants of $67.9 million after expenses. In 2004, the Company issued 306,748 shares of its common stock in connection with the conversion of 400,000 shares of Series C Preferred Stock into common stock. During 2005, the Company issued 920,244 shares of its common stock in connection with a written notice from one of the holders of the Series C Preferred Stock requesting the conversion of 1,200,000 shares of Series C Preferred Stock into common stock. On July 7, 2007, we issued 920,244 shares of our common stock to the holder of our Series C Preferred Stock upon the holder’s election to convert the remaining 1,200,000 shares of Series C Preferred Stock into common stock. As a result of the conversion, $26.6 million recorded in shareholders’ equity as 8.375% Series C Convertible Cumulative Preferred Stock was reclassified to additional paid-in capital in 2007.

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15. SUPPLEMENTARY QUARTERLY FINANCIAL DATA (UNAUDITED)
     The following is a summary of quarterly results of operations for the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007 (dollars in thousands, except per share data).
                                 
    2008 Quarter Ended
    March 31   June 30   Sept. 30   Dec. 31
Operating revenue
  $ 49,619     $ 50,120     $ 52,497     $ 50,767  
Income from continuing operations (a)
  $ 8,871     $ 9,829     $ 9,528     $ 8,377  
Income from discontinued operations (a)
  $ 82     $ 712     $     $  
Net Income
  $ 8,953     $ 10,541     $ 9,528     $ 8,377  
Net income available to common shareholders
  $ 8,953     $ 10,541     $ 9,528     $ 8,377  
Net Income Per Common Share
                               
Basic
  $ 0.41     $ 0.49     $ 0.44     $ 0.38  
Diluted
  $ 0.41     $ 0.48     $ 0.44     $ 0.38  
                                 
    2007 Quarter Ended
    March 31   June 30   Sept. 30   Dec. 31
Operating revenue (a)
  $ 44,371     $ 47,872     $ 50,765     $ 49,849  
Income from continuing operations (a)
  $ 9,437     $ 7,950     $ 10,757     $ 10,636  
Income from discontinued operations (a)
  $ 100     $ 114     $ 118     $ 102  
Net Income
  $ 9,537     $ 8,064     $ 10,875     $ 10,738  
Net income available to common shareholders
  $ 8,909     $ 7,436     $ 10,875     $ 10,738  
Net Income Per Common Share
                               
Basic
  $ 0.44     $ 0.36     $ 0.51     $ 0.50  
Diluted
  $ 0.44     $ 0.36     $ 0.51     $ 0.50  
 
(a)   Data as presented in this table differ from the amounts as presented in the Company’s quarterly reports due to the impact of discontinued operations accounting with respect to the one property sold in 2008 as described in Note 5.
16. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
     The Company’s current practice is to conduct environmental investigations in connection with property acquisitions. At this time, the Company is not aware of any environmental contamination of any of its facilities that individually or in the aggregate would be material to the Company’s overall business, financial condition, or results of operations.

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Item 9.   Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
     None.
Item 9A.   Controls and Procedures
Conclusion Regarding the Effectiveness of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
     Our management conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures, as such term is defined under Rule 13a-15(e) promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (Exchange Act), under the supervision of and with the participation of our management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer. Based on that evaluation, our management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective at December 31, 2008. There have not been changes in the Company’s internal controls or in other factors that could significantly affect these controls during the quarter ended December 31, 2008.
Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
     Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, and for performing an assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2008. Internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Our system of internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the Company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
     Our management performed an assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2008 based upon criteria in Internal Control — Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (''COSO’’). Based on our assessment, management determined that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of December 31, 2008 based on the criteria in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by COSO.
     The effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2008 has been audited by Ernst & Young LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, as stated in their report which is included in Item 9A herein.
     
/S/ Robert J. Attea
  /S/ David L. Rogers
Chief Executive Officer
  Chief Financial Officer

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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
The Board of Directors and Shareholders of Sovran Self Storage, Inc.
     We have audited Sovran Self Storage, Inc.’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2008, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (the COSO criteria). Sovran Self Storage, Inc.’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting included in the accompanying Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.
     We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
     A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
     Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
     In our opinion, Sovran Self Storage, Inc. maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2008, based on the COSO criteria.
     We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated balance sheets of Sovran Self Storage, Inc. as of December 31, 2008 and 2007, and the related consolidated statements of operations, shareholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2008 of Sovran Self Storage, Inc. and our report dated February 25, 2009 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.
/s/ Ernst & Young LLP
Buffalo, New York
February 25, 2009

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Part III
Item 10.   Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
          The information contained in the Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders of the Company to be held on May 21, 2009, with respect to directors, executive officers, audit committee, and audit committee financial experts of the Company and Section 16(a) beneficial ownership reporting compliance, is incorporated herein by reference in response to this item.
          The Company has adopted a code of ethics that applies to all of its directors, officers, and employees. The Company has made the Code of Ethics available on its website at http://www.sovranss.com.
Item 11.   Executive Compensation
          The information required is incorporated by reference to “Executive Compensation” and “Director Compensation” in the Company’s Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders of the Company to be held on May 21, 2009.
Item 12.   Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
          The information required herein is incorporated by reference to “Stock Ownership By Directors and Executive Officers” and “Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners” in the Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders of the Company to be held on May 21, 2009.
Item 13.   Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
          The information required herein is incorporated by reference to “Certain Transactions” and “Election of Directors—Director Independence” in the Company’s Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held on May 21, 2009.
Item 14.   Principal Accountant Fees and Services
          The information required herein is incorporated by reference to “Appointment of Independent Auditor” in the Company’s Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held on May 21, 2009.
Part IV
Item 15.   Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules
  (a)   Documents filed as part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K:
1.   The following consolidated financial statements of Sovran Self Storage, Inc. are included in Item 8.
  (i)   Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2008 and 2007.
 
  (ii)   Consolidated Statements of Operations for Years Ended December 31, 2008, 2007, and 2006.
 
  (iii)   Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity for Years Ended December 31, 2008, 2007, and 2006.
 
  (iv)   Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for Years Ended December 31, 2008, 2007, and 2006.
 
  (v)   Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
2.   The following financial statement Schedule as of the period ended December 31, 2008 is included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
    Schedule III Real Estate and Accumulated Depreciation.

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     All other Consolidated financial schedules are omitted because they are inapplicable, not required, or the information is included elsewhere in the consolidated financial statements or the notes thereto.
3.   Exhibits
     The exhibits required to be filed as part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K have been included as follows:
3.1   Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation of the Registrant. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 (a) to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form S-11 (File No. 33-91422) filed June 19, 1995).
 
3.2   Articles Supplementary to the Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation of the Registrant classifying and designating the series A Junior Participating Cumulative Preferred Stock. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Registrant’s Form 8-A filed December 3, 1996.)
 
3.3   Articles Supplementary to the Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation of the Registrant classifying and designating the 8.375% Series C Convertible Cumulative Preferred Stock. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed July 12, 2002).
 
3.4   Bylaws, as amended, of the Registrant (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.2 to Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed April 7, 2004).
 
4.1   Form of Common Stock Certificate (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form S-11 (File No. 33-91422) filed June 19, 1995).
 
10.1+   Sovran Self Storage, Inc. 2005 Award and Option Plan, as amended (incorporated by reference to the Registrant’s Proxy Statement filed April 11, 2005).
 
10.2+   Sovran Self Storage, Inc. 1995 Outside Directors’ Stock Option Plan, as amended (incorporated by reference to the Registrant’s Proxy Statement filed April 8, 2004).
 
10.3*+   Employment Agreement between the Registrant and Robert J. Attea.
 
10.4*+   Employment Agreement between the Registrant and Kenneth F. Myszka.
 
10.5*+   Employment Agreement between the Registrant and David L. Rogers.
 
10.6+   Form of restricted stock grant pursuant to Sovran Self Storage, Inc. 2005 Award and Option Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q/A filed November 24, 2006).
 
10.7+   Form of stock option grant pursuant to Sovran Self Storage, Inc. 2005 Award and Option Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q/A filed November 24, 2006).
 
10.8+   Form of restricted stock grant pursuant to Sovran Self Storage, Inc. 1995 Award and Option Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q/A filed November 24, 2006).
 
10.9+   Form of stock option grant pursuant to Sovran Self Storage, Inc. 1995 Award and Option Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 to Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q/A filed November 24, 2006).
 
10.10+   Deferred Compensation Plan for Directors (incorporated by reference to Schedule 14A Proxy Statement filed April 10, 2008).

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10.11   Amended Indemnification Agreements with members of the Board of Directors and Executive Officers (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.35 and 10.36 to Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed July 20, 2006).
 
10.12   Agreement of Limited Partnership of Sovran Acquisition Limited Partnership (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 on Form 10 filed April 22, 1998).
 
10.13*   Amendments to the Agreement of Limited Partnership of Sovran Acquisition Limited Partnership dated July 30, 1999 and July 3, 2002.
 
10.14   Promissory Note between Locke Sovran II, LLC and PNC Bank, National Association (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.22 to Registrant’s Form 10-K filed March 27, 2003).
 
10.15   Third Amended and Restated Revolving Credit and Term Loan Agreement among Registrant, the Partnership, Manufacturers and Traders Trust Company and other lenders named therein (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 filed in the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, filed June 27, 2008).
 
10.16   Cornerstone Acquisition Agreement and Amendments to Certain Loan Agreements (incorporated by reference to Exhibits 10.30, 10.31, 10.32, 10.33 and 10.34 of Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed June 26, 2006).
 
10.17   $150 million, 6.38% Senior Guaranteed Notes, Series C due April 26, 2016, and Amendments to Second Amendment Restated Revolving Credit and Term Loan Agreement dated December 16, 2004 and Amendment to Note Purchase Agreement dated September 4, 2003 (incorporated by reference to Exhibits 10.27, 10.28, and 10.29 of the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed May 1, 2006).
 
10.18   Promissory Note between Locke Sovran I, LLC and GMAC Commercial Mortgage Corporation (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.21 as filed in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, filed March 1, 2007).
 
12.1*   Statement Re: Computation of Earnings to Fixed Charges.
 
21.1*   Subsidiaries of the Company (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 21 as filed in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, filed March 1, 2007).
 
23.1*   Consent of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm.
 
24.1*   Powers of Attorney (included on signature pages).
 
31.1*   Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) and Rule 15d-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act, as amended.
 
31.2*   Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) and Rule 15d-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act, as amended.
 
32.1*   Certification of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350 as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
 
*   Filed herewith.
 
+   Management contract or compensatory plan or arrangement.

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SIGNATURES
     Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.
         
February 27, 2009  SOVRAN SELF STORAGE, INC.
 
 
  By:   /s/ David L. Rogers    
    David L. Rogers,   
    Chief Financial Officer,
Secretary 
 
 
     Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.
         
Signature   Title   Date
 
       
/s/ Robert J. Attea
 
Robert J. Attea
  Chairman of the Board of Directors Chief Executive Officer and Director
(Principal Executive Officer)
  February 27, 2009
 
       
/s/ Kenneth F. Myszka
 
Kenneth F. Myszka
  President, Chief Operating Officer and Director   February 27, 2009
 
       
/s/ David L. Rogers
 
David L. Rogers
  Chief Financial Officer
(Principal Financial and Accounting Officer)
  February 27, 2009
 
       
/s/ John Burns
 
John Burns
  Director    February 27, 2009
 
       
/s/ Michael A. Elia
 
Michael A. Elia
  Director    February 27, 2009
 
       
/s/ Anthony P. Gammie
 
Anthony P. Gammie
  Director    February 27, 2009
 
       
/s/ Charles E. Lannon
 
Charles E. Lannon
  Director    February 27, 2009

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Sovran Self Storage, Inc.
Schedule III
Combined Real Estate and Accumulated Depreciation
(in thousands)
December 31, 2008
                                                                                                 
                                    Cost Capitalized                                                   Life on
                                    Subsequent to           Gross Amount at Which                                   which
                    Initial Cost to Company   Acquisition   Carried at Close of Period                           depreciation
                            Building,   Building,           Building,                                   in latest
                            Equipment   Equipment           Equipment                                   income
            Encum           and   and           and           Accum.   Date of   Date   statement
Description   ST   brance   Land   Improvements   Improvements   Land   Improvements   Total   Deprec.   Construction   Acquired   is computed
Boston-Metro I
  MA           $ 363     $ 1,679     $ 528     $ 363       2,207     $ 2,570     $ 706       1980       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Boston-Metro II
  MA             680       1,616       361       680       1,977       2,657       699       1986       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
E. Providence
  RI             345       1,268       650       345       1,918       2,263       573       1984       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Charleston l
  SC             416       1,516       2,029       416       3,545       3,961       768       1985       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Lakeland I
  FL             397       1,424       1,436       397       2,860       3,257       626       1985       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Charlotte
  NC             308       1,102       1,076       747       1,739       2,486       563       1986       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Tallahassee I
  FL             770       2,734       1,869       770       4,603       5,373       1,476       1973       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Youngstown
  OH             239       1,110       1,298       239       2,408       2,647       628       1980       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Cleveland-Metro II
  OH             701       1,659       768       701       2,427       3,128       764       1987       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Tallahassee II
  FL             204       734       903       198       1,643       1,841       508       1975       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Pt. St. Lucie
  FL             395       1,501       854       779       1,971       2,750       758       1985       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Deltona
  FL             483       1,752       2,037       483       3,789       4,272       922       1984       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Middletown
  NY             224       808       796       224       1,604       1,828       526       1988       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Buffalo I
  NY             423       1,531       1,651       497       3,108       3,605       1,015       1981       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Rochester I
  NY             395       1,404       485       395       1,889       2,284       613       1981       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Salisbury
  MD             164       760       451       164       1,211       1,375       408       1979       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
New Bedford
  MA             367       1,325       447       367       1,772       2,139       635       1982       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Fayetteville
  NC             853       3,057       749       853       3,806       4,659       1,194       1980       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Jacksonville I
  FL             152       728       961       687       1,154       1,841       416       1985       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Columbia I
  SC             268       1,248       447       268       1,695       1,963       613       1985       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Rochester II
  NY             230       847       442       234       1,285       1,519       421       1980       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Savannah l
  GA             463       1,684       3,791       816       5,122       5,938       1,072       1981       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Greensboro
  NC             444       1,613       514       444       2,127       2,571       770       1986       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Raleigh I
  NC             649       2,329       844       649       3,173       3,822       1,029       1985       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
New Haven
  CT             387       1,402       912       387       2,314       2,701       657       1985       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Atlanta-Metro I
  GA             844       2,021       659       844       2,680       3,524       904       1988       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Atlanta-Metro II
  GA             302       1,103       349       303       1,451       1,754       541       1988       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Buffalo II
  NY             315       745       1,638       517       2,181       2,698       530       1984       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Raleigh II
  NC             321       1,150       654       321       1,804       2,125       548       1985       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Columbia II
  SC             361       1,331       594       374       1,912       2,286       655       1987       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Columbia III
  SC             189       719       1,079       189       1,798       1,987       506       1989       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Columbia IV
  SC             488       1,188       508       488       1,696       2,184       590       1986       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Atlanta-Metro III
  GA             430       1,579       1,884       602       3,291       3,893       753       1988       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Orlando I
  FL             513       1,930       446       513       2,376       2,889       864       1988       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  

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                                    Cost Capitalized                                                   Life on
                                    Subsequent to           Gross Amount at Which                                   which
                    Initial Cost to Company   Acquisition   Carried at Close of Period                           depreciation
                            Building,   Building,           Building,                                   in latest
                            Equipment   Equipment           Equipment                                   income
            Encum           and   and           and           Accum.   Date of   Date   statement
Description   ST   brance   Land   Improvements   Improvements   Land   Improvements   Total   Deprec.   Construction   Acquired   is computed
Sharon
  PA             194       912       440       194       1,352       1,546       450       1975       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Ft. Lauderdale
  FL             1,503       3,619       770       1,503       4,389       5,892       1,229       1985       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
West Palm l
  FL             398       1,035       265       398       1,300       1,698       515       1985       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Atlanta-Metro IV
  GA             423       1,015       364       424       1,378       1,802       515       1989       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Atlanta-Metro V
  GA             483       1,166       926       483       2,092       2,575       556       1988       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Atlanta-Metro VI
  GA             308       1,116       497       308       1,613       1,921       620       1986       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Atlanta-Metro VII
  GA             170       786       529       174       1,311       1,485       463       1981       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Atlanta-Metro VIII
  GA             413       999       615       413       1,614       2,027       612       1975       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Baltimore I
  MD             154       555       1,362       306       1,765       2,071       413       1984       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Baltimore II
  MD             479       1,742       2,783       479       4,525       5,004       870       1988       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Augusta I
  GA             357       1,296       824       357       2,120       2,477       667       1988       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Macon I
  GA             231       1,081       467       231       1,548       1,779       524       1989       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Melbourne I
  FL             883       2,104       1,570       883       3,674       4,557       1,151       1986       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Newport News
  VA             316       1,471       736       316       2,207       2,523       756       1988       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Pensacola I
  FL             632       2,962       1,091       651       4,034       4,685       1,422       1983       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Augusta II
  GA             315       1,139       768       315       1,907       2,222       590       1987       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Hartford-Metro I
  CT             715       1,695       1,038       715       2,733       3,448       798       1988       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Atlanta-Metro IX
  GA             304       1,118       2,443       619       3,246       3,865       732       1988       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Alexandria
  VA             1,375       3,220       1,975       1,376       5,194       6,570       1,445       1984       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Pensacola II
  FL             244       901       464       244       1,365       1,609       535       1986       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Melbourne II
  FL             834       2,066       1,124       1,591       2,433       4,024       924       1986       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Hartford-Metro II
  CT             234       861       1,881       612       2,364       2,976       568       1992       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Atlanta-Metro X
  GA             256       1,244       1,753       256       2,997       3,253       755       1988       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Norfolk I
  VA             313       1,462       795       313       2,257       2,570       755       1984       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Norfolk II
  VA             278       1,004       347       278       1,351       1,629       497       1989       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Birmingham I
  AL             307       1,415       1,550       384       2,888       3,272       701       1990       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Birmingham II
  AL             730       1,725       560       730       2,285       3,015       820       1990       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Montgomery l
  AL             863       2,041       624       863       2,665       3,528       931       1982       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Jacksonville II
  FL             326       1,515       415       326       1,930       2,256       679       1987       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Pensacola III
  FL             369       1,358       2,724       369       4,082       4,451       908       1986       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Pensacola IV
  FL             244       1,128       714       719       1,367       2,086       504       1990       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Pensacola V
  FL             226       1,046       531       226       1,577       1,803       564       1990       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Tampa I
  FL             1,088       2,597       951       1,088       3,548       4,636       1,249       1989       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Tampa II
  FL             526       1,958       742       526       2,700       3,226       952       1985       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Tampa III
  FL             672       2,439       577       672       3,016       3,688       1,034       1988       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Jackson I
  MS             343       1,580       2,204       796       3,331       4,127       725       1990       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Jackson II
  MS             209       964       590       209       1,554       1,763       581       1990       6/26/1995       5 to 40 years  
Richmond
  VA             443       1,602       720       443       2,322       2,765       777       1987       8/25/1995       5 to 40 years  
Orlando II
  FL             1,161       2,755       964       1,162       3,718       4,880       1,272       1986       9/29/1995       5 to 40 years  

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                                    Cost Capitalized                                                   Life on
                                    Subsequent to           Gross Amount at Which                                   which
                    Initial Cost to Company   Acquisition   Carried at Close of Period                           depreciation
                            Building,   Building,           Building,                                   in latest
                            Equipment   Equipment           Equipment                                   income
            Encum           and   and           and           Accum.   Date of   Date   statement
Description   ST   brance   Land   Improvements   Improvements   Land   Improvements   Total   Deprec.   Construction   Acquired   is computed
Birmingham III
  AL             424       1,506       671       424       2,177       2,601       833       1970       1/16/1996       5 to 40 years  
Macon II
  GA             431       1,567       723       431       2,290       2,721       720       1989/94       12/1/1995       5 to 40 years  
Harrisburg I
  PA             360       1,641       596       360       2,237       2,597       745       1983       12/29/1995       5 to 40 years  
Harrisburg II
  PA     (1 )     627       2,224       947       692       3,106       3,798       932       1985       12/29/1995       5 to 40 years  
Syracuse I
  NY             470       1,712       1,291       472       3,001       3,473       829       1987       12/27/1995       5 to 40 years  
Ft. Myers
  FL             205       912       305       206       1,216       1,422       530       1988       12/28/1995       5 to 40 years  
Ft. Myers II
  FL             412       1,703       440       413       2,142       2,555       889       1991/94       12/28/1995       5 to 40 years  
Newport News II
  VA             442       1,592       1,161       442       2,753       3,195       649       1988/93       1/5/1996       5 to 40 years  
Montgomery II
  AL             353       1,299       269       353       1,568       1,921       588       1984       1/23/1996       5 to 40 years  
Charleston II
  SC             237       858       624       232       1,487       1,719       482       1985       3/1/1996       5 to 40 years  
Tampa IV
  FL             766       1,800       645       766       2,445       3,211       772       1985       3/28/1996       5 to 40 years  
Arlington I
  TX             442       1,767       282       442       2,049       2,491       675       1987       3/29/1996       5 to 40 years  
Arlington II
  TX             408       1,662       1,031       408       2,693       3,101       800       1986       3/29/1996       5 to 40 years  
Ft. Worth
  TX             328       1,324       327       328       1,651       1,979       549       1986       3/29/1996       5 to 40 years  
San Antonio I
  TX             436       1,759       1,115       436       2,874       3,310       852       1986       3/29/1996       5 to 40 years  
San Antonio II
  TX             289       1,161       536       289       1,697       1,986       535       1986       3/29/1996       5 to 40 years  
Syracuse II
  NY             481       1,559       2,364       671       3,733       4,404       904       1983       6/5/1996       5 to 40 years  
Montgomery III
  AL             279       1,014       989       433       1,849       2,282       526       1988       5/21/1996       5 to 40 years  
West Palm II
  FL             345       1,262       325       345       1,587       1,932       535       1986       5/29/1996       5 to 40 years  
Ft. Myers III
  FL             229       884       299       229       1,183       1,412       379       1986       5/29/1996       5 to 40 years  
Pittsburgh
  PA             545       1,940       1,326       545       3,266       3,811       795       1990       6/19/1996       5 to 40 years  
Lakeland II
  FL             359       1,287       1,048       359       2,335       2,694       747       1988       6/26/1996       5 to 40 years  
Springfield
  MA             251       917       2,263       297       3,134       3,431       787       1986       6/28/1996       5 to 40 years  
Ft. Myers IV
  FL             344       1,254       267       310       1,555       1,865       522       1987       6/28/1996       5 to 40 years  
Cincinnati
  OH     (2 )     557       1,988       757       688       2,614       3,302       216       1988       7/23/1996       5 to 40 years  
Dayton
  OH     (2 )     667       2,379       433       683       2,796       3,479       246       1988       7/23/1996       5 to 40 years  
Baltimore III
  MD             777       2,770       432       777       3,202       3,979       985       1990       7/26/1996       5 to 40 years  
Jacksonville III
  FL             568       2,028       929       568       2,957       3,525       963       1987       8/23/1996       5 to 40 years  
Jacksonville IV
  FL             436       1,635       509       436       2,144       2,580       725       1985       8/26/1996       5 to 40 years  
Pittsburgh II
  PA             627       2,257       1,395       631       3,648       4,279       1,116       1983       8/28/1996       5 to 40 years  
Jacksonville V
  FL             535       2,033       300       538       2,330       2,868       842       1987/92       8/30/1996       5 to 40 years  
Charlotte II
  NC             487       1,754       409       487       2,163       2,650       613       1995       9/16/1996       5 to 40 years  
Charlotte III
  NC             315       1,131       337       315       1,468       1,783       441       1995       9/16/1996       5 to 40 years  
Orlando III
  FL             314       1,113       919       314       2,032       2,346       633       1975       10/30/1996       5 to 40 years  
Rochester III
  NY             704       2,496       1,208       707       3,701       4,408       927       1990       12/20/1996       5 to 40 years  
Youngstown ll
  OH             600       2,142       2,040       693       4,089       4,782       819       1988       1/10/1997       5 to 40 years  
Cleveland lll
  OH             751       2,676       1,772       751       4,448       5,199       1,166       1986       1/10/1997       5 to 40 years  
Cleveland lV
  OH             725       2,586       1,350       725       3,936       4,661       1,089       1978       1/10/1997       5 to 40 years  
Cleveland V
  OH     (1 )     637       2,918       1,602       701       4,456       5,157       1,412       1979       1/10/1997       5 to 40 years  

58


Table of Contents

                                                                                                 
                                    Cost Capitalized                                                   Life on
                                    Subsequent to           Gross Amount at Which                                   which
                    Initial Cost to Company   Acquisition   Carried at Close of Period                           depreciation
                            Building,   Building,           Building,                                   in latest
                            Equipment   Equipment           Equipment                                   income
            Encum           and   and           and           Accum.   Date of   Date   statement
Description   ST   brance   Land   Improvements   Improvements   Land   Improvements   Total   Deprec.   Construction   Acquired   is computed
Cleveland Vl
  OH             495       1,781       875       495       2,656       3,151       773       1979       1/10/1997       5 to 40 years  
Cleveland Vll
  OH             761       2,714       1,272       761       3,986       4,747       1,152       1977       1/10/1997       5 to 40 years  
Cleveland Vlll
  OH             418       1,921       1,573       418       3,494       3,912       1,002       1970       1/10/1997       5 to 40 years  
Cleveland lX
  OH             606       2,164       1,347       606       3,511       4,117       819       1982       1/10/1997       5 to 40 years  
Grand Rapids l
  MI     (2 )     455       1,631       948       624       2,410       3,034       211       1976       1/17/1997       5 to 40 years  
Grand Rapids ll
  MI             219       790       833       219       1,623       1,842       480       1983       1/17/1997       5 to 40 years  
Kalamazoo
  MI     (2 )     516       1,845       1,726       694       3,393       4,087       259       1978       1/17/1997       5 to 40 years  
Lansing
  MI     (2 )     327       1,332       1,527       542       2,644       3,186       210       1987       1/17/1997       5 to 40 years  
Holland
  MI             451       1,830       1,888       451       3,718       4,169       1,022       1978       1/17/1997       5 to 40 years  
San Antonio lll
  TX     (1 )     474       1,686       417       504       2,073       2,577       585       1981       1/30/1997       5 to 40 years  
Universal
  TX             346       1,236       297       346       1,533       1,879       472       1985       1/30/1997       5 to 40 years  
San Antonio lV
  TX             432       1,560       1,650       432       3,210       3,642       825       1995       1/30/1997       5 to 40 years  
Houston-Eastex
  TX             634       2,565       1,255       634       3,820       4,454       1,027       1993/95       3/26/1997       5 to 40 years  
Houston-Nederland
  TX             566       2,279       343       566       2,622       3,188       762       1995       3/26/1997       5 to 40 years  
Houston-College
  TX             293       1,357       563       293       1,920       2,213       518       1995       3/26/1997       5 to 40 years  
Lynchburg-Lakeside
  VA             335       1,342       1,271       335       2,613       2,948       657       1982       3/31/1997       5 to 40 years  
Lynchburg-Timberlake
  VA             328       1,315       962       328       2,277       2,605       648       1985       3/31/1997       5 to 40 years  
Lynchburg-Amherst
  VA             155       710       323       152       1,036       1,188       335       1987       3/31/1997       5 to 40 years  
Christiansburg
  VA             245       1,120       581       245       1,701       1,946       427       1985/90       3/31/1997       5 to 40 years  
Chesapeake
  VA             260       1,043       1,180       260       2,223       2,483       550       1988/95       3/31/1997       5 to 40 years  
Danville
  VA             326       1,488       223       326       1,711       2,037       502       1988       3/31/1997       5 to 40 years  
Orlando-W 25th St
  FL             289       1,160       737       616       1,570       2,186       458       1984       3/31/1997       5 to 40 years  
Delray l-Mini
  FL             491       1,756       630       491       2,386       2,877       762       1969       4/11/1997       5 to 40 years  
Savannah ll
  GA             296       1,196       347       296       1,543       1,839       471       1988       5/8/1997       5 to 40 years  
Delray ll-Safeway
  FL             921       3,282       466       921       3,748       4,669       1,155       1980       5/21/1997       5 to 40 years  
Cleveland X-Avon
  OH             301       1,214       2,079       304       3,290       3,594       640       1989       6/4/1997       5 to 40 years  
Dallas-Skillman
  TX             960       3,847       1,127       960       4,974       5,934       1,512       1975       6/30/1997       5 to 40 years  
Dallas-Centennial
  TX             965       3,864       1,241       943       5,127       6,070       1,498       1977       6/30/1997       5 to 40 years  
Dallas-Samuell
  TX     (1 )     570       2,285       786       611       3,030       3,641       912       1975       6/30/1997       5 to 40 years  
Dallas-Hargrove
  TX             370       1,486       515       370       2,001       2,371       649       1975       6/30/1997       5 to 40 years  
Houston-Antoine
  TX             515       2,074       562       515       2,636       3,151       797       1984       6/30/1997       5 to 40 years  
Atlanta-Alpharetta
  GA             1,033       3,753       429       1,033       4,182       5,215       1,307       1994       7/24/1997       5 to 40 years  
Atlanta-Marietta
  GA     (1 )     769       2,788       458       825       3,190       4,015       938       1996       7/24/1997       5 to 40 years  
Atlanta-Doraville
  GA             735       3,429       306       735       3,735       4,470       1,116       1995       8/21/1997       5 to 40 years  
GreensboroHilltop
  NC             268       1,097       377       268       1,474       1,742       405       1995       9/25/1997       5 to 40 years  
GreensboroStgCch
  NC             89       376       1,528       89       1,904       1,993       399       1997       9/25/1997       5 to 40 years  
Baton Rouge-Airline
  LA     (1 )     396       1,831       908       421       2,714       3,135       710       1982       10/9/1997       5 to 40 years  
Baton Rouge-Airline2
  LA             282       1,303       311       282       1,614       1,896       496       1985       11/21/1997       5 to 40 years  
Harrisburg-Peiffers
  PA             635       2,550       533       637       3,081       3,718       833       1984       12/3/1997       5 to 40 years  

59


Table of Contents

                                                                                                 
                                    Cost Capitalized                                                   Life on
                                    Subsequent to           Gross Amount at Which                                   which
                    Initial Cost to Company   Acquisition   Carried at Close of Period                           depreciation
                            Building,   Building,           Building,                                   in latest
                            Equipment   Equipment           Equipment                                   income
            Encum           and   and           and           Accum.   Date of   Date   statement
Description   ST   brance   Land   Improvements   Improvements   Land   Improvements   Total   Deprec.   Construction   Acquired   is computed
Chesapeake-Military
  VA             542       2,210       322       542       2,532       3,074       717       1996       2/5/1998       5 to 40 years  
Chesapeake-Volvo
  VA             620       2,532       880       620       3,412       4,032       916       1995       2/5/1998       5 to 40 years  
Virginia Beach-Shell
  VA             540       2,211       229       540       2,440       2,980       723       1991       2/5/1998       5 to 40 years  
Virginia Beach-Central
  VA             864       3,994       730       864       4,724       5,588       1,331       1993/95       2/5/1998       5 to 40 years  
Norfolk-Naval Base
  VA             1,243       5,019       729       1,243       5,748       6,991       1,604       1975       2/5/1998       5 to 40 years  
Tampa-E.Hillsborough
  FL             709       3,235       740       709       3,975       4,684       1,215       1985       2/4/1998       5 to 40 years  
Northbridge
  MA     (2 )     441       1,788       960       694       2,495       3,189       191       1988       2/9/1998       5 to 40 years  
Harriman
  NY             843       3,394       469       843       3,863       4,706       1,111       1989/95       2/4/1998       5 to 40 years  
Greensboro-High Point
  NC             397       1,834       551       397       2,385       2,782       654       1993       2/10/1998       5 to 40 years  
Lynchburg-Timberlake
  VA             488       1,746       487       488       2,233       2,721       606       1990/96       2/18/1998       5 to 40 years  
Titusville
  FL     (2 )     492       1,990       934       688       2,728       3,416       203       1986/90       2/25/1998       5 to 40 years  
Salem
  MA             733       2,941       1,014       733       3,955       4,688       1,120       1979       3/3/1998       5 to 40 years  
Chattanooga-Lee Hwy
  TN             384       1,371       534       384       1,905       2,289       549       1987       3/27/1998       5 to 40 years  
Chattanooga-Hwy 58
  TN             296       1,198       2,077       414       3,157       3,571       569       1985       3/27/1998       5 to 40 years  
Ft. Oglethorpe
  GA             349       1,250       583       349       1,833       2,182       517       1989       3/27/1998       5 to 40 years  
Birmingham-Walt
  AL             544       1,942       807       544       2,749       3,293       835       1984       3/27/1998       5 to 40 years  
East Greenwich
  RI             702       2,821       1,069       702       3,890       4,592       1,023       1984/88       3/26/1998       5 to 40 years  
Durham-Hillsborough
  NC             775       3,103       672       775       3,775       4,550       1,028       1988/91       4/9/1998       5 to 40 years  
Durham-Cornwallis
  NC             940       3,763       712       940       4,475       5,415       1,203       1990/96       4/9/1998       5 to 40 years  
Salem-Policy
  NH             742       2,977       464       742       3,441       4,183       891       1980       4/7/1998       5 to 40 years  
Warren-Elm
  OH     (1 )     522       1,864       1,175       569       2,992       3,561       717       1986       4/22/1998       5 to 40 years  
Warren-Youngstown
  OH             512       1,829       1,817       675       3,483       4,158       667       1986       4/22/1998       5 to 40 years  
Indian Harbor Beach
  FL             662       2,654       -619       662       2,035       2,697       612       1985       6/2/1998       5 to 40 years  
Jackson 3 - I55
  MS             744       3,021       128       744       3,149       3,893       879       1995       5/13/1998       5 to 40 years  
Katy-N.Fry
  TX             419       1,524       3,268       419       4,792       5,211       572       1994       5/20/1998       5 to 40 years  
Hollywood-Sheridan
  FL             1,208       4,854       352       1,208       5,206       6,414       1,411       1988       7/1/1998       5 to 40 years  
Pompano Beach-Atlantic
  FL             944       3,803       315       944       4,118       5,062       1,139       1985       7/1/1998       5 to 40 years  
Pompano Beach-Sample
  FL             903       3,643       329       903       3,972       4,875       1,051       1988       7/1/1998       5 to 40 years  
Boca Raton-18th St
  FL             1,503       6,059       705       1,503       6,764       8,267       1,850       1991       7/1/1998       5 to 40 years  
Vero Beach
  FL             489       1,813       110       489       1,923       2,412       573       1997       6/12/1998       5 to 40 years  
Humble
  TX             447       1,790       2,199       740       3,696       4,436       721       1986       6/16/1998       5 to 40 years  
Houston-Old Katy
  TX     (1 )     659       2,680       372       698       3,013       3,711       734       1996       6/19/1998       5 to 40 years  
Webster
  TX             635       2,302       129       635       2,431       3,066       660       1997       6/19/1998       5 to 40 years  
Carrollton
  TX             548       1,988       283       548       2,271       2,819       606       1997       6/19/1998       5 to 40 years  
Hollywood-N.21st
  FL             840       3,373       350       840       3,723       4,563       1,034       1987       8/3/1998       5 to 40 years  
San Marcos
  TX             324       1,493       629       324       2,122       2,446       585       1994       6/30/1998       5 to 40 years  
Austin-McNeil
  TX             492       1,995       317       510       2,294       2,804       665       1994       6/30/1998       5 to 40 years  
Austin-FM
  TX             484       1,951       442       481       2,396       2,877       646       1996       6/30/1998       5 to 40 years  
Jacksonville-Center
  NC             327       1,329       672       327       2,001       2,328       442       1995       8/6/1998       5 to 40 years  

60


Table of Contents

                                                                                                 
                                    Cost Capitalized                                                   Life on
                                    Subsequent to           Gross Amount at Which                                   which
                    Initial Cost to Company   Acquisition   Carried at Close of Period                           depreciation
                            Building,   Building,           Building,                                   in latest
                            Equipment   Equipment           Equipment                                   income
            Encum           and   and           and           Accum.   Date of   Date   statement
Description   ST   brance   Land   Improvements   Improvements   Land   Improvements   Total   Deprec.   Construction   Acquired   is computed
Jacksonville-Gum Branch
  NC             508       1,815       1,272       508       3,087       3,595       663       1989       8/17/1998       5 to 40 years  
Jacksonville-N.Marine
  NC             216       782       601       216       1,383       1,599       411       1985       9/24/1998       5 to 40 years  
Euless
  TX             550       1,998       654       550       2,652       3,202       635       1996       9/29/1998       5 to 40 years  
N. Richland Hills
  TX             670       2,407       1,362       670       3,769       4,439       801       1996       10/9/1998       5 to 40 years  
Batavia
  OH             390       1,570       867       390       2,437       2,827       553       1988       11/19/1998       5 to 40 years  
Jackson-N.West
  MS             460       1,642       462       460       2,104       2,564       642       1984       12/1/1998       5 to 40 years  
Katy-Franz
  TX             507       2,058       1,595       507       3,653       4,160       634       1993       12/15/1998       5 to 40 years  
W.Warwick
  RI             447       1,776       793       447       2,569       3,016       632       1986/94       2/2/1999       5 to 40 years  
Lafayette-Pinhook 1
  LA             556       1,951       926       556       2,877       3,433       877       1980       2/17/1999       5 to 40 years  
Lafayette-Pinhook2
  LA             708       2,860       267       708       3,127       3,835       807       1992/94       2/17/1999       5 to 40 years  
Lafayette-Ambassador
  LA             314       1,095       627       314       1,722       2,036       572       1975       2/17/1999       5 to 40 years  
Lafayette-Evangeline
  LA             188       652       1,414       188       2,066       2,254       558       1977       2/17/1999       5 to 40 years  
Lafayette-Guilbeau
  LA             963       3,896       767       963       4,663       5,626       1,099       1994       2/17/1999       5 to 40 years  
Gilbert-Elliot Rd
  AZ             651       2,600       1,097       772       3,576       4,348       767       1995       5/18/1999       5 to 40 years  
Glendale-59th Ave
  AZ             565       2,596       539       565       3,135       3,700       755       1997       5/18/1999       5 to 40 years  
Mesa-Baseline
  AZ             330       1,309       719       733       1,625       2,358       397       1986       5/18/1999       5 to 40 years  
Mesa-E.Broadway
  AZ             339       1,346       583       339       1,929       2,268       433       1986       5/18/1999       5 to 40 years  
Mesa-W.Broadway
  AZ             291       1,026       583       291       1,609       1,900       359       1976       5/18/1999       5 to 40 years  
Mesa-Greenfield
  AZ             354       1,405       334       354       1,739       2,093       445       1986       5/18/1999       5 to 40 years  
Phoenix-Camelback
  AZ             453       1,610       783       453       2,393       2,846       570       1984       5/18/1999       5 to 40 years  
Phoenix-Bell
  AZ             872       3,476       828       872       4,304       5,176       1,069       1984       5/18/1999       5 to 40 years  
Phoenix-35th Ave
  AZ             849       3,401       657       849       4,058       4,907       972       1996       5/21/1999       5 to 40 years  
Westbrook
  ME             410       1,626       1,753       410       3,379       3,789       623       1988       8/2/1999       5 to 40 years  
Cocoa
  FL             667       2,373       746       667       3,119       3,786       750       1982       9/29/1999       5 to 40 years  
Cedar Hill
  TX             335       1,521       346       335       1,867       2,202       478       1985       11/9/1999       5 to 40 years  
Monroe
  NY             276       1,312       1,153       276       2,465       2,741       439       1998       2/2/2000       5 to 40 years  
N.Andover
  MA             633       2,573       753       633       3,326       3,959       649       1989       2/15/2000       5 to 40 years  
Seabrook
  TX             633       2,617       315       633       2,932       3,565       683       1996       3/1/2000       5 to 40 years  
Plantation
  FL             384       1,422       367       384       1,789       2,173       411       1994       5/2/2000       5 to 40 years  
Birmingham-Bessemer
  AL             254       1,059       1,151       254       2,210       2,464       350       1998       11/15/2000       5 to 40 years  
Brewster
  NY     (2 )     1,716       6,920       903       1,981       7,558       9,539       577       1991/97       12/27/2000       5 to 40 years  
Austin-Lamar
  TX     (2 )     837       2,977       486       966       3,334       4,300       285       1996/99       2/22/2001       5 to 40 years  
Houston-E.Main
  TX     (2 )     733       3,392       568       841       3,852       4,693       308       1993/97       3/2/2001       5 to 40 years  
Ft.Myers-Abrams
  FL     (2 )     787       3,249       365       902       3,499       4,401       306       1997       3/13/2001       5 to 40 years  
Dracut
  MA     (1 )     1,035       3,737       590       1,104       4,258       5,362       762       1986       12/1/2001       5 to 40 years  
Methuen
  MA     (1 )     1,024       3,649       560       1,091       4,142       5,233       736       1984       12/1/2001       5 to 40 years  
Columbia 5
  SC     (1 )     883       3,139       1,204       942       4,284       5,226       703       1985       12/1/2001       5 to 40 years  
Myrtle Beach
  SC     (1 )     552       1,970       841       589       2,774       3,363       503       1984       12/1/2001       5 to 40 years  
Kingsland
  GA     (1 )     470       1,902       2,875       666       4,581       5,247       521       1989       12/1/2001       5 to 40 years  

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Table of Contents

                                                                                                 
                                    Cost Capitalized                                                   Life on
                                    Subsequent to           Gross Amount at Which                                   which
                    Initial Cost to Company   Acquisition   Carried at Close of Period                           depreciation
                            Building,   Building,           Building,                                   in latest
                            Equipment   Equipment           Equipment                                   income
            Encum           and   and           and           Accum.   Date of   Date   statement
Description   ST   brance   Land   Improvements   Improvements   Land   Improvements   Total   Deprec.   Construction   Acquired   is computed
Saco
  ME     (1 )     534       1,914       278       570       2,156       2,726       388       1988       12/3/2001       5 to 40 years  
Plymouth
  MA             1,004       4,584       2,261       1,004       6,845       7,849       868       1996       12/19/2001       5 to 40 years  
Sandwich
  MA     (1 )     670       3,060       400       714       3,416       4,130       625       1984       12/19/2001       5 to 40 years  
Syracuse
  NY     (1 )     294       1,203       372       327       1,542       1,869       312       1987       2/5/2002       5 to 40 years  
Houston-Westward
  TX     (1 )     853       3,434       851       912       4,226       5,138       772       1976       2/13/2002       5 to 40 years  
Houston-Boone
  TX     (1 )     250       1,020       484       268       1,486       1,754       273       1983       2/13/2002       5 to 40 years  
Houston-Cook
  TX     (1 )     285       1,160       315       306       1,454       1,760       275       1986       2/13/2002       5 to 40 years  
Houston-Harwin
  TX     (1 )     449       1,816       593       480       2,378       2,858       433       1981       2/13/2002       5 to 40 years  
Houston-Hempstead
  TX     (1 )     545       2,200       935       583       3,097       3,680       523       1974/78       2/13/2002       5 to 40 years  
Houston-Kuykendahl
  TX     (1 )     517       2,090       1,179       553       3,233       3,786       509       1979/83       2/13/2002       5 to 40 years  
Houston-Hwy 249
  TX     (1 )     299       1,216       1,053       320       2,248       2,568       357       1983       2/13/2002       5 to 40 years  
Mesquite-Hwy 80
  TX     (1 )     463       1,873       620       496       2,460       2,956       414       1985       2/13/2002       5 to 40 years  
Mesquite-Franklin
  TX     (1 )     734       2,956       678       784       3,584       4,368       594       1984       2/13/2002       5 to 40 years  
Dallas-Plantation
  TX     (1 )     394       1,595       283       421       1,851       2,272       335       1985       2/13/2002       5 to 40 years  
San Antonio-Hunt
  TX     (1 )     381       1,545       666       411       2,181       2,592       355       1980       2/13/2002       5 to 40 years  
Humble-5250 FM
  TX             919       3,696       341       919       4,037       4,956       658       1998/02       6/19/2002       5 to 40 years  
Pasadena
  TX             612       2,468       231       612       2,699       3,311       439       1999       6/19/2002       5 to 40 years  
League City-E.Main
  TX             689       3,159       267       689       3,426       4,115       563       1994/97       6/19/2002       5 to 40 years  
Montgomery
  TX             817       3,286       2,040       1,119       5,024       6,143       602       1998       6/19/2002       5 to 40 years  
Texas City
  TX             817       3,286       123       817       3,409       4,226       576       1999       6/19/2002       5 to 40 years  
Houston-Hwy 6
  TX             407       1,650       178       407       1,828       2,235       305       1997       6/19/2002       5 to 40 years  
Lumberton
  TX             817       3,287       178       817       3,465       4,282       578       1996       6/19/2002       5 to 40 years  
The Hamptons l
  NY             2,207       8,866       615       2,207       9,481       11,688       1,450       1989/95       12/16/2002       5 to 40 years  
The Hamptons 2
  NY             1,131       4,564       479       1,131       5,043       6,174       758       1998       12/16/2002       5 to 40 years  
The Hamptons 3
  NY             635       2,918       322       635       3,240       3,875       480       1997       12/16/2002       5 to 40 years  
The Hamptons 4
  NY             1,251       5,744       340       1,252       6,083       7,335       919       1994/98       12/16/2002       5 to 40 years  
Duncanville
  TX             1,039       4,201       41       1,039       4,242       5,281       584       1995/99       8/26/2003       5 to 40 years  
Dallas-Harry Hines
  TX             827       3,776       297       827       4,073       4,900       531       1998/01       10/1/2003       5 to 40 years  
Stamford
  CT             2,713       11,013       298       2,713       11,311       14,024       1,408       1998       3/17/2004       5 to 40 years  
Houston-Tomball
  TX             773       3,170       1,771       773       4,941       5,714       512       2000       5/19/2004       5 to 40 years  
Houston-Conroe
  TX             1,195       4,877       106       1,195       4,983       6,178       598       2001       5/19/2004       5 to 40 years  
Houston-Spring
  TX             1,103       4,550       249       1,103       4,799       5,902       585       2001       5/19/2004       5 to 40 years  
Houston-Bissonnet
  TX             1,061       4,427       2,646       1,061       7,073       8,134       631       2003       5/19/2004       5 to 40 years  
Houston-Alvin
  TX             388       1,640       849       388       2,489       2,877       227       2003       5/19/2004       5 to 40 years  
Clearwater
  FL             1,720       6,986       74       1,720       7,060       8,780       837       2001       6/3/2004       5 to 40 years  
Houston-Missouri City
  TX             1,167       4,744       456       1,566       4,801       6,367       563       1998       6/23/2004       5 to 40 years  
Chattanooga-Hixson
  TN             1,365       5,569       761       1,365       6,330       7,695       757       1998/02       8/4/2004       5 to 40 years  
Austin-Round Rock
  TX             2,047       5,857       665       2,051       6,518       8,569       727       2000       8/5/2004       5 to 40 years  
East Falmouth
  MA             1,479       5,978       153       1,479       6,131       7,610       602       1998       2/23/2005       5 to 40 years  

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Table of Contents

                                                                                                 
                                    Cost Capitalized                                                   Life on
                                    Subsequent to           Gross Amount at Which                                   which
                    Initial Cost to Company   Acquisition   Carried at Close of Period                           depreciation
                            Building,   Building,           Building,                                   in latest
                            Equipment   Equipment           Equipment                                   income
            Encum           and   and           and           Accum.   Date of   Date   statement
Description   ST   brance   Land   Improvements   Improvements   Land   Improvements   Total   Deprec.   Construction   Acquired   is computed
Cicero
  NY             527       2,121       499       527       2,620       3,147       270       1988/02       3/16/2005       5 to 40 years  
Bay Shore
  NY             1,131       4,609       57       1,131       4,666       5,797       469       2003       3/15/2005       5 to 40 years  
Springfield-Congress
  MA             612       2,501       93       612       2,594       3,206       260       1965/75       4/12/2005       5 to 40 years  
Stamford-Hope
  CT             1,612       6,585       192       1,612       6,777       8,389       666       2002       4/14/2005       5 to 40 years  
Houston-Jones
  TX     3,510       1,214       4,949       77       1,215       5,025       6,240       470       1997/99       6/6/2005       5 to 40 years  
Montgomery-Richard
  AL             1,906       7,726       106       1,906       7,832       9,738       737       1997       6/1/2005       5 to 40 years  
Oxford
  MA             470       1,902       1,577       470       3,479       3,949       191       2002       6/23/2005       5 to 40 years  
Austin-290E
  TX             537       2,183       160       537       2,343       2,880       218       2003       7/12/2005       5 to 40 years  
SanAntonio-Marbach
  TX             556       2,265       202       556       2,467       3,023       220       2003       7/12/2005       5 to 40 years  
Austin-South 1st
  TX             754       3,065       149       754       3,214       3,968       293       2003       7/12/2005       5 to 40 years  
Pinehurst
  TX             484       1,977       1,357       484       3,334       3,818       211       2002/04       7/12/2005       5 to 40 years  
Marietta-Austell
  GA             811       3,397       428       811       3,825       4,636       343       2003       9/15/2005       5 to 40 years  
Baton Rouge-Florida
  LA             719       2,927       1,935       719       4,862       5,581       280       1984/94       11/15/2005       5 to 40 years  
Cypress
  TX             721       2,994       1,087       721       4,081       4,802       305       2003       1/13/2006       5 to 40 years  
Texas City
  TX             867       3,499       94       867       3,593       4,460       280       2003       1/10/2006       5 to 40 years  
San Marcos-Hwy 35S
  TX             628       2,532       449       982       2,627       3,609       205       2001       1/10/2006       5 to 40 years  
Baytown
  TX             596       2,411       78       596       2,489       3,085       199       2002       1/10/2006       5 to 40 years  
Webster
  NY             937       3,779       111       937       3,890       4,827       290       2002/06       2/1/2006       5 to 40 years  
Houston-Jones Rd 2
  TX             707       2,933       2,018       707       4,951       5,658       315       2000       3/9/2006       5 to 40 years  
Cameron-Scott
  LA     1,000       411       1,621       131       411       1,752       2,163       147       1997       4/13/2006       5 to 40 years  
Lafayette-Westgate
  LA             463       1,831       73       463       1,904       2,367       140       2001/04       4/13/2006       5 to 40 years  
Broussard
  LA             601       2,406       1,231       601       3,637       4,238       216       2002       4/13/2006       5 to 40 years  
Congress-Lafayette
  LA     1,098       542       1,319       2,084       542       3,403       3,945       134       1997/99       4/13/2006       5 to 40 years  
Manchester
  NH             832       3,268       57       832       3,325       4,157       231       2000       4/26/2006       5 to 40 years  
Nashua
  NH             617       2,422       373       617       2,795       3,412       175       1989       6/29/2006       5 to 40 years  
Largo 2
  FL     2,478       1,270       5,037       157       1,270       5,194       6,464       343       1998       6/22/2006       5 to 40 years  
Pinellas Park
  FL             929       3,676       104       929       3,780       4,709       245       2000       6/22/2006       5 to 40 years  
Tarpon Springs
  FL     2,301       696       2,739       96       696       2,835       3,531       184       1999       6/22/2006       5 to 40 years  
New Orleans
  LA     4,196       1,220       4,805       75       1,220       4,880       6,100       320       2000       6/22/2006       5 to 40 years  
St Louis-Meramec
  MO     4,841       1,113       4,359       176       1,113       4,535       5,648       293       1999       6/22/2006       5 to 40 years  
St Louis-Charles Rock
  MO             766       3,040       79       766       3,119       3,885       200       1999       6/22/2006       5 to 40 years  
St Louis-Shackelford
  MO     2,433       828       3,290       124       828       3,414       4,242       222       1999       6/22/2006       5 to 40 years  
St Louis-W.Washington
  MO     3,873       734       2,867       533       734       3,400       4,134       223       1980/01       6/22/2006       5 to 40 years  
St Louis-Howdershell
  MO             899       3,596       174       899       3,770       4,669       248       2000       6/22/2006       5 to 40 years  
St Louis-Lemay Ferry
  MO             890       3,552       167       890       3,719       4,609       239       1999       6/22/2006       5 to 40 years  
St Louis-Manchester
  MO     3,658       697       2,711       92       697       2,803       3,500       183       2000       6/22/2006       5 to 40 years  
Arlington-Little Rd
  TX     2,020       1,256       4,946       145       1,256       5,091       6,347       329       1998/03       6/22/2006       5 to 40 years  
Dallas-Goldmark
  TX             605       2,434       47       605       2,481       3,086       162       2004       6/22/2006       5 to 40 years  
Dallas-Manana
  TX             607       2,428       107       607       2,535       3,142       165       2004       6/22/2006       5 to 40 years  

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